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The Federal Aviation Administration may still be figuring out how to politely negotiate with commercial drones in the airspace, but goateed metalhead Johnny Dronehunter doesn’t wait for rules, man. Nah. He’d prefer to shoot down drones with a giant silencer he’s selling for gun accessory company SilencerCo.
Note: He is also a Defender of Privacy.
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The Federal Aviation Administration may still be figuring out how to politely negotiate with commercial drones in the airspace, but goateed metalhead Johnny Dronehunter doesn’t wait for rules, man. Nah. He’d prefer to shoot down drones with a giant silencer he’s selling for gun accessory company SilencerCo.

Note: He is also a Defender of Privacy.

Read More>

A small Texas firm called Tracking Point has invented a smart rifle with an intelligent heads-up-display that can turn anyone into a sharp shooter. The invention combines technology from digital cameras, mobile devices, and smart displays into one very lethal package. With a top-end Tracking Point rifle, you can accurately hit a moving target at 1,200 yards, which is about two thirds of a mile.
It’s for hunting…
Watch it in action

A small Texas firm called Tracking Point has invented a smart rifle with an intelligent heads-up-display that can turn anyone into a sharp shooter. The invention combines technology from digital cameras, mobile devices, and smart displays into one very lethal package. With a top-end Tracking Point rifle, you can accurately hit a moving target at 1,200 yards, which is about two thirds of a mile.

It’s for hunting…

Watch it in action

This is what happens when bullets hit things.

Photographer Deborah Bay doesn’t want to detail her own gun control views: “I think it’s up to the viewer to interpret the work,” she says. But the photographer does ask us to “realize the impact any of these bullets would have on muscle and bone,” and to appreciate how pervasive guns have become in America.

Infographic: The 9,595 Americans Murdered By Guns In 2010

HOW DO YOU DEPICT THE 400,000 YEARS OF LIFE LOST TO GUNS ANNUALLY? NOT BY AGGREGATING, BUT BY SHOWING EACH LIFE AS A DISCRETE LINE.

“We’re hoping that people will see these individual victims,” the team tells Co.Design. “We’re not looking at aggregate numbers. We’re not trying to analyze this data. This data was living and breathing, and has now been extinguished. We’re hoping to keep their flames living on in the hearts of others.”

That word “flame” plays out literally. A black background is cut with a burning orange or yellow arc of light (a person’s life). Upon death, they fall from the sky, and a “ghost lift” line finishes their trajectory. It’s absolutely cutting to look at, especially after a few moments, when the graphic just inundates you with lost life—what adds up to 400,000 years of living, taken by bullets.

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This stunning visualization by Periscopic makes the sad numbers behind gun deaths more tangible.

Art! Guns! Our favorite combination. Check out these rad works made by artist Walton Creel:


Creel — a sort of modern-day George Seurat in hunting gear — creates figurative compositions of wildlife by blasting his .22-caliber rifle at point-blank range into big sheets of aluminum. (Gah, that’s gotta’ be dangerous!) The resulting dot matrices of bunnies and deer and squirrels look innocent enough from afar, like black-and-white sketches out of Audubon. It’s only up close that you realize that they’ve seen more bullets than East Oakland.
Mind you, Creel who hails from Birmingham, Alabama, says the point here is to “deweaponize” the gun. “My main goal was to take the destructive power away from the gun,” he says on his website, “To manipulate the gun into a tool of creation.” Read that as you will: An ironic protest or a glorification of firearms. All’s we know is that seeing sweet little bunny ears made out of bullet holes only reminds us that the bunny’s usually on the receiving end of the rifle.

Art! Guns! Our favorite combination. Check out these rad works made by artist Walton Creel:

Creel — a sort of modern-day George Seurat in hunting gear — creates figurative compositions of wildlife by blasting his .22-caliber rifle at point-blank range into big sheets of aluminum. (Gah, that’s gotta’ be dangerous!) The resulting dot matrices of bunnies and deer and squirrels look innocent enough from afar, like black-and-white sketches out of Audubon. It’s only up close that you realize that they’ve seen more bullets than East Oakland.

Mind you, Creel who hails from Birmingham, Alabama, says the point here is to “deweaponize” the gun. “My main goal was to take the destructive power away from the gun,” he says on his website, “To manipulate the gun into a tool of creation.” Read that as you will: An ironic protest or a glorification of firearms. All’s we know is that seeing sweet little bunny ears made out of bullet holes only reminds us that the bunny’s usually on the receiving end of the rifle.