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"Plants are just another object we take for granted. We think of them as a thing that sits in the corner that we water once a week. But really, they can be so much more than that. They can be a remote. They can be a musical instrument. They can be anything interactive that takes you away from plastic and glass and into the whole world that’s touchable around you. 

Watch: Two Fast Company interns hacked houseplants to make them play music when they’re touched

"Plants became more than just a plant. They became actual objects that we have an incentive to water." 

Getting around San Francisco just got easier, at least if you don’t mind a little bit of wind in your face. The Scoot Network and its fleet of electric-powered scooters just announced that it was expanding, adding five new locations for riders around the city for a grand total of 17 Scoot hubs.
What is Scoot, exactly? Think a CitiBike or ZipCar membership but for green-friendly, Vespa-like mopeds. Since launching 16 months ago, Scoot claims its members have treaded over 50,000 miles, and have kept 62,000 pounds of CO2 out of the environment. 
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Getting around San Francisco just got easier, at least if you don’t mind a little bit of wind in your face. The Scoot Network and its fleet of electric-powered scooters just announced that it was expanding, adding five new locations for riders around the city for a grand total of 17 Scoot hubs.

What is Scoot, exactly? Think a CitiBike or ZipCar membership but for green-friendly, Vespa-like mopeds. Since launching 16 months ago, Scoot claims its members have treaded over 50,000 miles, and have kept 62,000 pounds of CO2 out of the environment. 

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"Tomato vines are suspended above conference tables, lemon and passion fruit trees are used as partitions for meeting spaces, salad leaves are grown inside seminar rooms and bean sprouts are grown under benches. The main lobby also features a rice paddy and a broccoli field."

A building in Tokyo that has 200 species of rice, fruits, and veggies may have reached new levels in the craze to “green” the office.

The second tallest building in the world is more like a vertical city than a building. Think of it like this: the 632-meter tall Shanghai Tower is a bustling mixed-use metropolis with more green space (and even more people) than many cities on the ground can boast of having.

The statistics on the building, which ranks only behind Dubai’s Burj Khalifa in height, are staggering: 521,000 meters squared of floor space, 106 elevators, a weight of 1,200 metric tons, the ability to hold 30,000 people (it really is like a small city), and the kicker—one-third of the building is dedicated entirely to green space.

One Innovation By Design entrant is Hello Compost, a proposed program in which low-income families will be able exchange compost for produce credits.

“We need to re-imagine the role of food waste from being a smelly, unattractive side effect of eating to an attractive resource for residents to positively impact their community and to help put fresh food on the table,” says cofounder Aly Blenkin.

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We’re finding some super aggressive colonies that are attaching to plastic very well.

Researchers have discovered microbial communities living on the waste we dump in the ocean.

Their study found 1,000 different types of bacteria on ocean plastic samples, including plants, algae, autotrophs, and predators. They warn that plastic is also serving as a new kind of transportation for potentially harmful bacteria looking to hitch a ride across the ocean. 

We think of 3-D printers as desktop machines, stagnant workhorses used to generate piecemeal shapes for humans to relocate in the real world. But a new, stunning piece of architecture by the Mediated Matter Group at MIT Media Lab brings all of those assumptions into question.

It’s called the Silk Pavilion, and it is what researchers call a “biological swarm approach to 3-D printing.” It is a beautiful structure constructed by 6,500 live silkworms, and may be the most epicly named piece of fabrication technology since the blowtorch. 

Read more here: How MIT Is Hacking Thousands Of Worms To Print Buildings