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Why Google Music Targets Social And The Cloud

Google launched its long-overdue music store today, roughly eight years into the reign of Apple’s iTunes Store, which just sold its 16 billionth song. Clearly Google has a lot of catching up to do—and that’s just with Apple. Amazon has had a digital music store since 2007 that’s known for its aggressive pricing, while Facebook recently integrated third-party streaming services such as Spotify, Rhapsody, Rdio, and MOG.

Why has Google entered such a saturated market?


Tuesday, Google Launched Music Beta, a cloud-based music service that lets you stream  all your songs from any device. Well, any Android-based device, at least  according to Google. But as we learned after a day of playing, Music  Beta can work just as well without Android—and that may just be where  Google has a leg up against Apple and iTunes.

How To Make Google Music Beta Into An iPhone App And More

Tuesday, Google Launched Music Beta, a cloud-based music service that lets you stream all your songs from any device. Well, any Android-based device, at least according to Google. But as we learned after a day of playing, Music Beta can work just as well without Android—and that may just be where Google has a leg up against Apple and iTunes.

How To Make Google Music Beta Into An iPhone App And More


It all started at CES in January of 2010. That’s when Google met with  execs from various major record labels, I’m told, to discuss launching a  possible music service. The meetings were very exploratory, but it  sounded at the time like the service would be cloud-based.
Fast forward to the present, and rumors of Google’s music service  haven’t become any clearer: We’ve seen leaked screenshots, read of  relevant music acquisitions and internal testing, and heard reports of  stalled negotiations. As one music industry source recently told me,  "Google music is now surpassing Spotify as the best music service that  never launched."
However, negotiations between Google and the labels are still very active… continued.

It all started at CES in January of 2010. That’s when Google met with execs from various major record labels, I’m told, to discuss launching a possible music service. The meetings were very exploratory, but it sounded at the time like the service would be cloud-based.

Fast forward to the present, and rumors of Google’s music service haven’t become any clearer: We’ve seen leaked screenshots, read of relevant music acquisitions and internal testing, and heard reports of stalled negotiations. As one music industry source recently told me, "Google music is now surpassing Spotify as the best music service that never launched."

However, negotiations between Google and the labels are still very active… continued.