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Daily Fast Feed Roundup
Happy Hump Day Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 
An app called Cat Academy will teach spanish and other languages through pictures of cute cats. Me(ow) gusta! 
Analysts say that the U.S. retail safety plan for Bangladesh factories is weak, especially in comparison to its European equivalent.
Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano was forced to abandon his spacewalk after a suit malfunction that filled his helmet with water. Scary! 
The Google Glass team considered 'pew pew pew' and 'go go glass' before they went with its trigger term, ‘Ok glass.’
Airbnb is slowing international hiring and reorganizing in an attempt to prevent startup burnout. 
As we reported earlier today, Tumblr has fixed a bug in its iOS app and recommends that users change their passwords.
Jay-Z’s new album set a record on Spotify with 14-million whole album streams.
Watch out Apple! Google just released its iOS Maps 2.0 update. 
Fresh Apple rumors are milling. A new iPhone with features like a finger print reader and lighter, plastic components may be in the works.
Thanks to a team that lugged a trolley camera around the Parisian landmark, Google Street View users are getting a view from the Eiffel Tower.
Have a great day!
—M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Daily Fast Feed Roundup

Happy Hump Day Tumblr! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 

  • An app called Cat Academy will teach spanish and other languages through pictures of cute cats. Me(ow) gusta! 

Have a great day!

M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

After Apple booted Google Maps from iOS last year, Daniel Graf led the development of a beautiful, refreshed mapping experience that shot to number one in the iTunes store and kicked Apple’s ass on its own turf. Here’s how Graf made it happen—in his own words:
“We have a very successful Android version of Google Maps, so the easiest thing to do was to say, this is super-successful, users love it, so why don’t we just port it over to iOS? But I wanted to challenge the team. While the Android version is a great product, you can also tell it’s been around for a while. You have to access everything via menus—it’s not really best-use-case driven anymore. I said, let’s take a step back—what if we could start from scratch and forget anything we’ve ever done? We have the foundation—the Google data, the mapping data, the local business data, the imagery, the navigation algorithms—it’s a dream to start with.”
More…

After Apple booted Google Maps from iOS last year, Daniel Graf led the development of a beautiful, refreshed mapping experience that shot to number one in the iTunes store and kicked Apple’s ass on its own turf. Here’s how Graf made it happen—in his own words:

We have a very successful Android version of Google Maps, so the easiest thing to do was to say, this is super-successful, users love it, so why don’t we just port it over to iOS? But I wanted to challenge the team. While the Android version is a great product, you can also tell it’s been around for a while. You have to access everything via menus—it’s not really best-use-case driven anymore. I said, let’s take a step back—what if we could start from scratch and forget anything we’ve ever done? We have the foundation—the Google data, the mapping data, the local business data, the imagery, the navigation algorithms—it’s a dream to start with.”

More…

Setting has always been a living character in Wes Anderson’s films—from the school in Rushmore to the tree houses of Fantastic Mr. Fox—and his new movie, Moonrise Kingdom, out May 25, lives just as strongly inside its own world. “We were looking for a sort of naked wildlife,” he says.

Moonrise Kingdom is about two 12-year-olds who fall in love and run away in the summer of 1965, and Anderson didn’t have the time to send scouts to every wilderness in America. So he did what everyone else does: “We literally used Google Earth,” he says. It took months to settle on a location.

HOW WES ANDERSON USED GOOGLE TO MAKE “MOONRISE KINGDOM”

Derived from technology that was originally intended to guide missiles, a company called C3 Technologies has just licensed their powerful new mapping technology to Nokia.

C3’s peacetime use renders 3-D color models of entire cities—its buildings, statues, even its trees—to a resolution of 15 centimeters.

This video shows how playing with C3’s maps—twirling, panning, zooming—on a tablet could easily make you feel just a little bit like, well, God.

More on why some have called this new tech “Google Maps on steroids.”