FastCompany Magazine

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Susan Wojcicki built Google into a $55 billion advertising giant. Now she’s running YouTube. Her job: Do it again.
When Susan Wojcicki took over YouTube in February, she received almost as much unsolicited advice as there are YouTube videos. One open letter not-so-subtly pleaded with Wojcicki, ”So please, I’m begging you, please, please, please, don’t f*** it up.” 
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Susan Wojcicki built Google into a $55 billion advertising giant. Now she’s running YouTube. Her job: Do it again.

When Susan Wojcicki took over YouTube in February, she received almost as much unsolicited advice as there are YouTube videos. One open letter not-so-subtly pleaded with Wojcicki, ”So please, I’m begging you, please, please, please, don’t f*** it up.” 

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Google Wants Developers Building Virtual-Reality Apps For A Piece Of Cardboard

As usual, Google handed out an array of freebies to attendees of its I/O conference, hoping to entice developers to build applications for its devices. Among them: a square smatchwatch—their choice of the LG G Watch or Samsung Gear Live, the round Moto 360 watch, and a piece of cardboard.

Though attendees were confused by the cardboard gesture, they soon realized the flat piece of pasteboard could be folded to construct a virtual-reality headset powered by an Android phone. And as with the smartwatches handed out, Google wants apps for Cardboard.

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Google’s interaction design guru explains why better haptics in our devices mean needing a better way to repair them when they break.
When you think about it, smartphones haven’t changed dramatically since the iPhone was first released in 2007. Sure, they have gotten faster, more powerful, and thinner. They have far better sound, displays, and cameras. But at the end of the day, we’re all still using our smartphones the same way we did then: by tapping a glass screen.
That’s frustrating, because there’s a world of other ways we could interact with our devices, from reaching through them to touch someone 3,000 miles away or using puffs of air to feel objects and textures in mid-air.
These methods of interacting with our devices are called haptics, and it’s the area in smartphone and mobile device design where innovation has virtually stood still since the introduction of the touch screen. Why?
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Google’s interaction design guru explains why better haptics in our devices mean needing a better way to repair them when they break.

When you think about it, smartphones haven’t changed dramatically since the iPhone was first released in 2007. Sure, they have gotten faster, more powerful, and thinner. They have far better sound, displays, and cameras. But at the end of the day, we’re all still using our smartphones the same way we did then: by tapping a glass screen.

That’s frustrating, because there’s a world of other ways we could interact with our devices, from reaching through them to touch someone 3,000 miles away or using puffs of air to feel objects and textures in mid-air.

These methods of interacting with our devices are called haptics, and it’s the area in smartphone and mobile device design where innovation has virtually stood still since the introduction of the touch screen. Why?

Read More>

At today’s Google I/O keynote, Google revealed its plan to redesign itself from the ground up.
Google took to the stage in San Francisco to roll out most of its big plans for the year. Some were great, others less so. But between the Android update, its burgeoning smartwatch platform and its never-ending quest to conquer your living room, there was plenty to chew on. Here’s the best (and the rest), of Google I/O 2014.
Read More>

At today’s Google I/O keynote, Google revealed its plan to redesign itself from the ground up.

Google took to the stage in San Francisco to roll out most of its big plans for the year. Some were great, others less so. But between the Android update, its burgeoning smartwatch platform and its never-ending quest to conquer your living room, there was plenty to chew on. Here’s the best (and the rest), of Google I/O 2014.

Read More>