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Your job seems normal now. In 15 years, when someone tells you they’re a simplicity expert or a robot counselor, you won’t blink an eye.
All of the predictions we’ve seen lately regarding the “jobs of the future” assume that we’ll even have jobs once the robots take over. Eventually, we may not. But in the medium-term future, there will still be jobs for the taking (including jobs overseeing robots).
The Canadian Scholarship Trust teamed up with futurists to imagine a job fair in 2030, with predictions based on the environmental, social, technological, and social trends happening now. Here are some of the jobs they came up with.
Read More>

Your job seems normal now. In 15 years, when someone tells you they’re a simplicity expert or a robot counselor, you won’t blink an eye.

All of the predictions we’ve seen lately regarding the “jobs of the future” assume that we’ll even have jobs once the robots take over. Eventually, we may not. But in the medium-term future, there will still be jobs for the taking (including jobs overseeing robots).

The Canadian Scholarship Trust teamed up with futurists to imagine a job fair in 2030, with predictions based on the environmental, social, technological, and social trends happening now. Here are some of the jobs they came up with.

Read More>

  • "…it snaps a photo of the fridge’s contents whenever you open the door, allowing you to check what food you already have before you stop off at the store on your way home from work.”

  • Your SmartThings hub could detect that you’ve woken up, either through a motion sensor outside your bedroom or a biometric wristband like the Jawbone Up, and turn on the lights in your kitchen and activate the outlet to which your coffee pot is connected, starting the coffee brewing if you had the foresight to put the grinds in the night before. When you enter the kitchen, motion sensors could trigger a Sonos speaker to give you a weather report and play the news. When you leave for work, the home senses that you are gone and shuts everything down.”

2014: The year companies try to make the kitchen the smartest room in the house

See What Your iPhone And Other Personal Effects Will Look Like “100 Years Later.”

A new project from Maico Akiba shows modern objects as you’ve never seen them before: the way our descendants will see them 100 years from now.

Read more here.

Famous Foodies Imagine Dinner Plates From The Future
Food & Wine sent out white paper plates to some of the greatest food thinkers of our time—along with architects, artists, and designers and asked them to imagine the food of the future. 

Gardens vs. Factories, by Jono Pandolfi
Genetic modification gone too far (but vegetables are even easier to match).

Food of the Future for the 1% by Anthony Bourdain.

Pharm to Table by AvroKo.

Dirty Dishes by Gail Simmons. “We can no longer feign naivety at the connection of food and the environment.”

But laughs aside, the undertones here are often quite serious. Following an era of ultimate abundance and globalized food, we’re faced with a deteriorating climate, overfished oceans, and an industrial farming system that’s inflexibly configured for monoculture. In other words, we’d better stock up on edible 3-D printer cartridges, or start getting used to the texture of antenna.

See more entries and read the full story here. 

Famous Foodies Imagine Dinner Plates From The Future

Food & Wine sent out white paper plates to some of the greatest food thinkers of our time—along with architects, artists, and designers and asked them to imagine the food of the future. 

Gardens vs. Factories, by Jono Pandolfi

Genetic modification gone too far (but vegetables are even easier to match).

Food of the Future for the 1% by Anthony Bourdain.

Pharm to Table by AvroKo.

Dirty Dishes by Gail Simmons. “We can no longer feign naivety at the connection of food and the environment.”

But laughs aside, the undertones here are often quite serious. Following an era of ultimate abundance and globalized food, we’re faced with a deteriorating climate, overfished oceans, and an industrial farming system that’s inflexibly configured for monoculture. In other words, we’d better stock up on edible 3-D printer cartridges, or start getting used to the texture of antenna.

See more entries and read the full story here.