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Take a look at the chair you’re sitting in. What’s it made out of? Was it manufactured locally? Chances are, it’s constructed from a mix of materials that have a lengthy supply chain spanning much of the globe. Not so with the chairs made by Chairigami, a one-person company founded by recent Yale graduate Zach Rotholz. Chairigami’s furniture is made from local materials (near the company headquarters of New Haven, Connecticut), recyclable, lightweight, flat-packed, and easy to assemble. It’s also made entirely out of thick, triple-wall cardboard.

Take a look at the chair you’re sitting in. What’s it made out of? Was it manufactured locally? Chances are, it’s constructed from a mix of materials that have a lengthy supply chain spanning much of the globe. Not so with the chairs made by Chairigami, a one-person company founded by recent Yale graduate Zach Rotholz. Chairigami’s furniture is made from local materials (near the company headquarters of New Haven, Connecticut), recyclable, lightweight, flat-packed, and easy to assemble. It’s also made entirely out of thick, triple-wall cardboard.

fastcodesign:

Who among us hasn’t, at one point or another, hunkered down inside and stared out through a crystal-clear pane, letting the mind wander and daydreams flutter through and stay a while? 
Seoul-born, Stockholm-based designer Mars HwaSung Yoo used imagination and memories as the starting point for a new chair he was working on, which led him to the idea of ancient window forms. 
“They have a sense of place, invite us to sit, and play a variety of roles in their long history as architectural elements,” Yoo tells Co.Design. “After I had the concept, all parts of the window had to be redefined to support the function of a chair; it didn’t have to be an exact replica.” Instead, he focused on bringing this aged craft into the present with a handmade aesthetic.

fastcodesign:

Who among us hasn’t, at one point or another, hunkered down inside and stared out through a crystal-clear pane, letting the mind wander and daydreams flutter through and stay a while?

Seoul-born, Stockholm-based designer Mars HwaSung Yoo used imagination and memories as the starting point for a new chair he was working on, which led him to the idea of ancient window forms.

“They have a sense of place, invite us to sit, and play a variety of roles in their long history as architectural elements,” Yoo tells Co.Design. “After I had the concept, all parts of the window had to be redefined to support the function of a chair; it didn’t have to be an exact replica.” Instead, he focused on bringing this aged craft into the present with a handmade aesthetic.

(via fastcodesign)

OooooOOOH stickers!! Collect ‘em, trade ‘em, stick ‘em, give ‘em to a friend! Pogs, Pokemon, Rainbow Brite, NBA players, we love everything on a sticker! Especially furniture you can make:

The DIY project you see here, by Sweden’s Pål Rodenius,  follows a logic that has doubtless passed through the gray matter of  anyone who’s ever spent a Saturday night with a hammer and a printout  from Instructables.com: If people use dress patterns to make their own clothes, why can’t they do the same with furniture?
What “2440x1220 Saw, Assemble” does is squeeze variously colored  outlines for tables, beds, shelves, and chairs onto a single massive  blueprint. Each color corresponds to different pieces of furniture—gray  for a chair and a table; red for a shelf and a bench; and so forth.  Then all you’ve got to do is pick the design you like, cut around the  lines, and voila, a new bedroom set! It’s so damned simple, it makes  Instructables look like a chapter out of Tristram Shandy.
Rodenius sells the blueprint inked on a 4-by-8 sheet of plywood for  100 Euros (about $140) through his website. That obviously translates to  horridly expensive (and eco-unfriendly!) shipping for anyone who isn’t  Rodenius’s next-door neighbor, so the designer has plans to release the  outlines on a giant paper sticker. Users would then roll it out over a  slab of plywood that they buy on their own.
No word on when the sticker will be available, but check Rodenius’s website for updates.

OooooOOOH stickers!! Collect ‘em, trade ‘em, stick ‘em, give ‘em to a friend! Pogs, Pokemon, Rainbow Brite, NBA players, we love everything on a sticker! Especially furniture you can make:

The DIY project you see here, by Sweden’s Pål Rodenius, follows a logic that has doubtless passed through the gray matter of anyone who’s ever spent a Saturday night with a hammer and a printout from Instructables.com: If people use dress patterns to make their own clothes, why can’t they do the same with furniture?

What “2440x1220 Saw, Assemble” does is squeeze variously colored outlines for tables, beds, shelves, and chairs onto a single massive blueprint. Each color corresponds to different pieces of furniture—gray for a chair and a table; red for a shelf and a bench; and so forth. Then all you’ve got to do is pick the design you like, cut around the lines, and voila, a new bedroom set! It’s so damned simple, it makes Instructables look like a chapter out of Tristram Shandy.

Rodenius sells the blueprint inked on a 4-by-8 sheet of plywood for 100 Euros (about $140) through his website. That obviously translates to horridly expensive (and eco-unfriendly!) shipping for anyone who isn’t Rodenius’s next-door neighbor, so the designer has plans to release the outlines on a giant paper sticker. Users would then roll it out over a slab of plywood that they buy on their own.

No word on when the sticker will be available, but check Rodenius’s website for updates.

Robots are furniture! Run for your lives!


Why buy multiple pieces of furniture, when you could have one piece of furniture that could transform itself into whatever you need at the moment—a chair, a sofa, a table? For that matter, why settle for static, inanimate furniture at all? This is the idea behind “Roombots,” miniature modular robots that are something like Legos — except they’re also autonomous, and can walk around.
When you don’t need anything to sit on, the bots would be able to configure themselves into something obscure over in the corner, like a box. And if you have a falling out with your roommate, you could even have them transform into a wall.
The Roombots are part of a larger trend in robotics of robot swarms, the notion that many miniature robots could be more powerful than just a few big ones. Recently, the University of Pennsylvania’s GRASP lab demonstrated that small robot quadrocopters could team up to construct the frame of a building. If robots are going to building our homes and decorating our interiors, let’s hope they have good taste.


Watch all of these horrifying videos when you click through.

Robots are furniture! Run for your lives!

Why buy multiple pieces of furniture, when you could have one piece of furniture that could transform itself into whatever you need at the moment—a chair, a sofa, a table? For that matter, why settle for static, inanimate furniture at all? This is the idea behind “Roombots,” miniature modular robots that are something like Legos — except they’re also autonomous, and can walk around.

When you don’t need anything to sit on, the bots would be able to configure themselves into something obscure over in the corner, like a box. And if you have a falling out with your roommate, you could even have them transform into a wall.

The Roombots are part of a larger trend in robotics of robot swarms, the notion that many miniature robots could be more powerful than just a few big ones. Recently, the University of Pennsylvania’s GRASP lab demonstrated that small robot quadrocopters could team up to construct the frame of a building. If robots are going to building our homes and decorating our interiors, let’s hope they have good taste.

Watch all of these horrifying videos when you click through.