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Move over, green juice. Startup execs, Hollywood A-listers, and regular joes are now swearing by butter-infused Bulletproof coffee.


“Did I throw a handful of products up against a refrigerator and see what stuck? No. Anything that increases human performance is fair game.”

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Move over, green juice. Startup execs, Hollywood A-listers, and regular joes are now swearing by butter-infused Bulletproof coffee.

“Did I throw a handful of products up against a refrigerator and see what stuck? No. Anything that increases human performance is fair game.”

Read More>

How Elizabeth Meltz is using technology to turn Batali hotspots like Babbo into some of the restaurant biz’s most eco-friendly eateries.
When you eat at Babbo, Del Posto, or any of Mario Batali and Joe Bastianich’s other celebrated restaurants, you can be sure that every aspect of the pasta and wine have been carefully considered. What you might not realize is that your meal’s environmental impact has been just as closely thought through.
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How Elizabeth Meltz is using technology to turn Batali hotspots like Babbo into some of the restaurant biz’s most eco-friendly eateries.

When you eat at BabboDel Posto, or any of Mario Batali and Joe Bastianich’s other celebrated restaurants, you can be sure that every aspect of the pasta and wine have been carefully considered. What you might not realize is that your meal’s environmental impact has been just as closely thought through.

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About 60 miles from the site of the deadly 2011 nuclear disaster in Fukushima prefecture, inside a former silicon chip manufacturing facility owned by the Japanese computer company Fujitsu, a small team of highly trained engineers are working on one of the company’s hottest new products. Fujitsu’s marketing team claims it’s already proving a hit with their oldest—and youngest—consumers. It’s so popular, in fact, it’s probably just the first in a long line of related Fujitsu products. The product is lettuce.
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About 60 miles from the site of the deadly 2011 nuclear disaster in Fukushima prefecture, inside a former silicon chip manufacturing facility owned by the Japanese computer company Fujitsu, a small team of highly trained engineers are working on one of the company’s hottest new products. Fujitsu’s marketing team claims it’s already proving a hit with their oldest—and youngest—consumers. It’s so popular, in fact, it’s probably just the first in a long line of related Fujitsu products. The product is lettuce.

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The tangy tale of Tessemae’s salad dressing. Made by Greg Vetter and his two brothers, it just hit Costco’s shelves. Lettuce, rejoice.

GREG VETTER: My brothers and I were wild as hell, and my mom had to figure out how to get us to eat our vegetables. She made this lemon garlic dressing, and suddenly we were just crushing salad at dinner. We played high school, college, and professional lacrosse, and the only thing the teams ever asked of our mom was to bring that salad dressing. When we went to college, she made it for our college houses in two-liter bottles.
I moved in with my girlfriend, now wife, and my mom made salad dressing for our house. One day in January of 2009, I came home to have lunch, and the salad dressing was missing from the fridge. I called one of my buddies, Smitty, who doesnot eat salad—he eats Taco Bell for lunch every day—and I was like, “Did you take my salad dressing?” And he said, “Yeah, I woke up, I needed it, I knew the code to your house, I got it, and now I’m eating spinach.” I’m like, “Well, bring it back.” He’s like, “Okay.”
Later I’m with my mom, and I’m like, “What kind of man steals another man’s salad dressing?” I’m like, “I think we should bottle this. If I get us into Whole Foods, will you go into business with me?” She was like, “It’s never gonna work.” I was like, “That’s not what I asked you.”

I called Whole Foods and told them I was a food manufacturer, which wasn’t true. I got a meeting with one of the grocery buyers, and I walked in with a Tupperware container of salad. The guy’s like, “Where’s the packaging?” I’m like, “Dude, you’re busy, it’s lunch, I brought you a salad.” He looks at me like I’m on something, but soon he’s taking these pieces of wet lettuce and licking the dressing off. He says, “You have something special.”

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The tangy tale of Tessemae’s salad dressing. Made by Greg Vetter and his two brothers, it just hit Costco’s shelves. Lettuce, rejoice.

GREG VETTER: My brothers and I were wild as hell, and my mom had to figure out how to get us to eat our vegetables. She made this lemon garlic dressing, and suddenly we were just crushing salad at dinner. We played high school, college, and professional lacrosse, and the only thing the teams ever asked of our mom was to bring that salad dressing. When we went to college, she made it for our college houses in two-liter bottles.

I moved in with my girlfriend, now wife, and my mom made salad dressing for our house. One day in January of 2009, I came home to have lunch, and the salad dressing was missing from the fridge. I called one of my buddies, Smitty, who doesnot eat salad—he eats Taco Bell for lunch every day—and I was like, “Did you take my salad dressing?” And he said, “Yeah, I woke up, I needed it, I knew the code to your house, I got it, and now I’m eating spinach.” I’m like, “Well, bring it back.” He’s like, “Okay.”

Later I’m with my mom, and I’m like, “What kind of man steals another man’s salad dressing?” I’m like, “I think we should bottle this. If I get us into Whole Foods, will you go into business with me?” She was like, “It’s never gonna work.” I was like, “That’s not what I asked you.”

image

I called Whole Foods and told them I was a food manufacturer, which wasn’t true. I got a meeting with one of the grocery buyers, and I walked in with a Tupperware container of salad. The guy’s like, “Where’s the packaging?” I’m like, “Dude, you’re busy, it’s lunch, I brought you a salad.” He looks at me like I’m on something, but soon he’s taking these pieces of wet lettuce and licking the dressing off. He says, “You have something special.”

Read More>

"It’s mind-boggling to come into this old building and see so much greenery. The colors are almost electric. Looking at this kale planted two weeks ago, you’d be shocked at how quickly it’s grown."
Urban Organics uses aquaponics to grow tilapia and vegetables in an old industrial space with no dirt and sun. It’s bringing jobs and production back to a downtrodden neighborhood in St. Paul Minnesota—and local food, as well.
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"It’s mind-boggling to come into this old building and see so much greenery. The colors are almost electric. Looking at this kale planted two weeks ago, you’d be shocked at how quickly it’s grown."

Urban Organics uses aquaponics to grow tilapia and vegetables in an old industrial space with no dirt and sun. It’s bringing jobs and production back to a downtrodden neighborhood in St. Paul Minnesota—and local food, as well.

Read More>

A new dessert craze is poised to sweep Los Angeles—and maybe far beyond. Happy summer, people.
Ever since we hit peak cronut, dreaming up the next hybrid frankenfood has become something of a culinary arm’s race. On the high end, foodie havens like Brooklyn’s Smorgasbord have been pushing the ramen burger (side note: it’s alriiight), while lower-brow fast food chains like Taco Bell are now assembling breakfast tacos made with waffles.
None of those really held a sugary torch, mind you, to pastry chef Dominique Ansel’s original masterpiece, which at one point drew lines around the block that stretched for more than two hours. But this—this—re-imagined ice cream sandwich by Los Angeles chef Sylvia Yoo might be the closest thing we’ve seen yet. Because churros.
Read More>

A new dessert craze is poised to sweep Los Angeles—and maybe far beyond. Happy summer, people.

Ever since we hit peak cronut, dreaming up the next hybrid frankenfood has become something of a culinary arm’s race. On the high end, foodie havens like Brooklyn’s Smorgasbord have been pushing the ramen burger (side note: it’s alriiight), while lower-brow fast food chains like Taco Bell are now assembling breakfast tacos made with waffles.

None of those really held a sugary torch, mind you, to pastry chef Dominique Ansel’s original masterpiece, which at one point drew lines around the block that stretched for more than two hours. But this—this—re-imagined ice cream sandwich by Los Angeles chef Sylvia Yoo might be the closest thing we’ve seen yet. Because churros.

Read More>

A new project from the burrito chain and author Jonathan Safran Foer puts some intelligent musings in front of you as you stuff your face.

The next time you eat a burrito, it might come wrapped up in a poem or a little philosophy from a Harvard professor. Starting today, Chipotle will be rolling out a new line of oddly literary packaging—bags and cups printed with new writing both from authors you might find in the New Yorker as well as comedians like Sarah Silverman.

Read More>

A new project from the burrito chain and author Jonathan Safran Foer puts some intelligent musings in front of you as you stuff your face.

The next time you eat a burrito, it might come wrapped up in a poem or a little philosophy from a Harvard professor. Starting today, Chipotle will be rolling out a new line of oddly literary packaging—bags and cups printed with new writing both from authors you might find in the New Yorker as well as comedians like Sarah Silverman.

Read More>

Like to drink beer while bowling? This new packaging concept combines the two activities into one.
Most of us are pretty proud of ourselves when we recycle a bottle instead of throwing it into the trash. But recycling isn’t a perfect process. If you’re recycling aluminum, it’s highly efficient, but glass—which is so beloved for beer and wine drinkers—is ostensibly a wash.

Enter Ford Jekson, a conceptual drink by Constantin Bolimond. It reimagines the six-pack as a reusable toy that you can bowl with. Each bottle becomes a pin, and a ball—which appears to have no practical purpose beyond being a ball—comes packaged with it to complete the game.
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Like to drink beer while bowling? This new packaging concept combines the two activities into one.

Most of us are pretty proud of ourselves when we recycle a bottle instead of throwing it into the trash. But recycling isn’t a perfect process. If you’re recycling aluminum, it’s highly efficient, but glass—which is so beloved for beer and wine drinkers—is ostensibly a wash.

image

Enter Ford Jekson, a conceptual drink by Constantin Bolimond. It reimagines the six-pack as a reusable toy that you can bowl with. Each bottle becomes a pin, and a ball—which appears to have no practical purpose beyond being a ball—comes packaged with it to complete the game.

Read More>

When the menu is on the screen and you’re hungry, you add a side dish. You click, its ready to go. Over the phone you just order what you set out to. We see way less impulse purchases of appetizers over the phone. We also see a lot more upsells, items like street cart fries are two bucks extra with the meal because it’s in front of you.

The Hidden Psychology Of Ordering Food Online