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"I would much rather be in a business with an asshole that I love and trust, than an asshole who’s going to fuck me."

It’s that sort of extreme honesty that has helped super-close friends Michael Chernow and Daniel Holzman succeed in the brutal restaurant industry with their New York City-based Meatball Shop. But it hasn’t always been easy, as that Chernow quip implies. First they had to land on the right idea (drunk people love meatballs!). Then they had to survive the always-tough opening run (they did and inspired a CBS sitcom in the process!). Then they had to survive each other. That’s where things get interesting.

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In this episode of Brand Evolution, we look at the evolution of one of America’s cornerstone brands, Coca-Cola. From its origins in an Atlanta pharmacy through the creation of the iconic bottle and the development of its classic advertising, we look at the pivotal moments in the history of one of the world’s most instantly recognizable, and valuable, brands.

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By some counts, the $177 billion meat-producing industry accounts for 18% of all greenhouse gas emissions.

So what better week than this one—following the People’s Climate March and during the UN Climate Change Summit—to talk about meat alternatives?

On this episode of The 29th FloorFast Company's Noah Robischon and Mark Wilson do just that, digging into everything from veggie-shaped ribs to what it might take to create the perfect fake burger. Other staffers, meanwhile, sampled Beyond Meat’s soy and pea-packed patties. Their verdict? Pretty tasty—but we still have a ways to go before we’re truly thinking outside the bun.

Taco Bell opened the doors to its Innovation Kitchen to Fast Company writer Mark Wilson and he wasted no time abusing the privilege by creating a brand new taco called The Piñata. Will it make the final menu? Watch and see.

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The host of CNN’s Parts Unknown (starting again on Sunday) wants to make a great show—and challenge some cultural assumptions.

The point is to resist the predictable, especially when it comes to TV’s ingrained conventions. “The only thing that makes me upset and, really, a dick is if something is fucking plodding and reasonable,” he says, spitting out that last word with palpable revulsion. “It starts with an establishing shot, I go someplace, I meet somebody, I sit down, I eat, and I come to a conclusion: That kind of conventional thinking really upsets me. I would much rather see some incomprehensible, over-the-top, fucked-up thing, because at least you’re trying to do something awesome.”

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The host of CNN’s Parts Unknown (starting again on Sunday) wants to make a great show—and challenge some cultural assumptions.

The point is to resist the predictable, especially when it comes to TV’s ingrained conventions. “The only thing that makes me upset and, really, a dick is if something is fucking plodding and reasonable,” he says, spitting out that last word with palpable revulsion. “It starts with an establishing shot, I go someplace, I meet somebody, I sit down, I eat, and I come to a conclusion: That kind of conventional thinking really upsets me. I would much rather see some incomprehensible, over-the-top, fucked-up thing, because at least you’re trying to do something awesome.”

Read More>

Overall, men were twice as likely to eat bugs than women, and every 10-year increase in age was associated with a 27% decrease in the likelihood of eating insects, they report in the journal Food Quality and Preference. 
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Overall, men were twice as likely to eat bugs than women, and every 10-year increase in age was associated with a 27% decrease in the likelihood of eating insects, they report in the journal Food Quality and Preference

Read More>

Google does it. So does Facebook and Twitter. Are free snacks and drinks making our workplaces better—or more fattening?
A couple of centuries ago, women were taught the way to a man’s heart was through his stomach. In today’s world this dating advice seems overtly old-fashioned, but the theory could partially hold true for companies wanting to retain employees.
According to a recent WorkSphere survey conducted by Harris Poll on behalf of the staffing agency Spherion, if you want a happy worker, then feed them. Around 30% of respondents said the availability of food throughout the day contributes to their workplace happiness.
Whether you offer free cookies in the break room, doughnuts at meetings, or—following the lead of Google, Facebook, and Twitter—provide full-blown meals prepared by a company chef, smart companies should give the idea some thought, but understand that free food doesn’t necessarily equal a more productive staff. It’s more complicated than that, say experts.
“With examples like Google, we’re constantly reminded of the chicken-or-the-egg dilemma,” says Frank Bosco, assistant professor of management in the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Business in Richmond, Virginia. “That is—is Google successful because they offer all sorts of perks, resulting in better-performing employees? Or, do they offer free food because they’ve been so successful over the years?”
Read More>

Google does it. So does Facebook and Twitter. Are free snacks and drinks making our workplaces better—or more fattening?

A couple of centuries ago, women were taught the way to a man’s heart was through his stomach. In today’s world this dating advice seems overtly old-fashioned, but the theory could partially hold true for companies wanting to retain employees.

According to a recent WorkSphere survey conducted by Harris Poll on behalf of the staffing agency Spherion, if you want a happy worker, then feed them. Around 30% of respondents said the availability of food throughout the day contributes to their workplace happiness.

Whether you offer free cookies in the break room, doughnuts at meetings, or—following the lead of Google, Facebook, and Twitter—provide full-blown meals prepared by a company chef, smart companies should give the idea some thought, but understand that free food doesn’t necessarily equal a more productive staff. It’s more complicated than that, say experts.

“With examples like Google, we’re constantly reminded of the chicken-or-the-egg dilemma,” says Frank Bosco, assistant professor of management in the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Business in Richmond, Virginia. “That is—is Google successful because they offer all sorts of perks, resulting in better-performing employees? Or, do they offer free food because they’ve been so successful over the years?”

Read More>

Why are habaneros hotter than jalapeños? Conventional wisdom points to the Scoville Scale —the standard measurement of spicy chemicals in food. By Scoville’s laws, heat is just a number, and since habanero peppers have more Scoville units than jalapeño peppers, habaneros are hotter.
But Scoville units only tell part of the story behind hot foods. What’s the mechanism that makes food feel hot in the first place?
Read More>

Why are habaneros hotter than jalapeños? Conventional wisdom points to the Scoville Scale —the standard measurement of spicy chemicals in food. By Scoville’s laws, heat is just a number, and since habanero peppers have more Scoville units than jalapeño peppers, habaneros are hotter.

But Scoville units only tell part of the story behind hot foods. What’s the mechanism that makes food feel hot in the first place?

Read More>