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There’s nothing fashionable about the millions of tons of plastic trash fouling the earth’s oceans and littering her shorelines. But a revolutionary denim clothing line called G-Star RAW for the Oceans is bringing the ocean’s salvaged plastic debris, from algae-covered drink bottles to doll heads, center stage. The result is a denim line that not only helps clean up the world’s oceans and shorelines but also is desirable to customers, says the company’s chief marketing officer, Thecla Schaeffer.
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There’s nothing fashionable about the millions of tons of plastic trash fouling the earth’s oceans and littering her shorelines. But a revolutionary denim clothing line called G-Star RAW for the Oceans is bringing the ocean’s salvaged plastic debris, from algae-covered drink bottles to doll heads, center stage. The result is a denim line that not only helps clean up the world’s oceans and shorelines but also is desirable to customers, says the company’s chief marketing officer, Thecla Schaeffer.

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A new website from a couple MIT grads lets customers haggle for high-end, locally made products.
Haggling is an age-old tradition at marketplaces around the world, but price negotiations between merchants and buyers haven’t quite made their way into the world of e-commerce.
Theorem, a San Francisco-based startup headed by MIT grads Ryan Jackson and Adam Roberts, is trying to change that.
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A new website from a couple MIT grads lets customers haggle for high-end, locally made products.

Haggling is an age-old tradition at marketplaces around the world, but price negotiations between merchants and buyers haven’t quite made their way into the world of e-commerce.

Theorem, a San Francisco-based startup headed by MIT grads Ryan Jackson and Adam Roberts, is trying to change that.

Read More>

Here’s what’s happening in Fast Company’s September issue!

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(via fastcompany)

Here’s what’s happening in Fast Company’s September issue!

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The three-year-old startup has developed a front-end interface for helping web shoppers find the perfect fit.
A woman shopping for summer clothes spots a dress on Pinterest and clicks through to the retailer’s product page. She zooms in on the pattern, selects the coral version, and decides the price is within her budget—but then, she hesitates.
For most online shoppers, that moment of hesitation is the result of inconsistent sizing, a problem costing the fashion industry over $3 billion per year.
Read More>

The three-year-old startup has developed a front-end interface for helping web shoppers find the perfect fit.

A woman shopping for summer clothes spots a dress on Pinterest and clicks through to the retailer’s product page. She zooms in on the pattern, selects the coral version, and decides the price is within her budget—but then, she hesitates.

For most online shoppers, that moment of hesitation is the result of inconsistent sizing, a problem costing the fashion industry over $3 billion per year.

Read More>

The Annotated Guide To Banana Republic’s “Startup Guy” Look
Banana Republic, for its fall fashion line, has put together a “Startup Guy” look, which reads more “Brooklyn Guy on the L train” than hoodie-wearing tech dork. But no matter: Fashion is aspirational. “The Startup Guy” outfit isn’t what dudes working in tech today actually wear, it is what they may want to look like after they see BR’s latest catalog.
But what exactly makes this man in khakis and a blue button-down—pretty standard fare for business casual—the prototypical “startup guy”? Fast Company tried discern what about this getup Banana Republic thinks screams “startup guy.” 
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The Annotated Guide To Banana Republic’s “Startup Guy” Look

Banana Republic, for its fall fashion line, has put together a “Startup Guy” look, which reads more “Brooklyn Guy on the L train” than hoodie-wearing tech dork. But no matter: Fashion is aspirational. “The Startup Guy” outfit isn’t what dudes working in tech today actually wear, it is what they may want to look like after they see BR’s latest catalog.

But what exactly makes this man in khakis and a blue button-down—pretty standard fare for business casual—the prototypical “startup guy”? Fast Company tried discern what about this getup Banana Republic thinks screams “startup guy.” 

Read More>

Capsule — arguably the most influential men’s fashion tradeshow in North America — started from an unlikely source: Shiny, expensive t-shirts.

The first Capsule show back in 2007 featured just 45 designers. Now the show carves out room for 777 designers from 25 countries around the world.

BMPW founders: Edina Sultanik, Deirdre Maloney, and Minya Quirk
"A great candidate for Capsule is a brand that’s made by real people who love what they’re doing on a small to mid-sized level," says Minya Quirk. 
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Capsule — arguably the most influential men’s fashion tradeshow in North America — started from an unlikely source: Shiny, expensive t-shirts.

image

The first Capsule show back in 2007 featured just 45 designers. Now the show carves out room for 777 designers from 25 countries around the world.

image

BMPW founders: Edina Sultanik, Deirdre Maloney, and Minya Quirk

"A great candidate for Capsule is a brand that’s made by real people who love what they’re doing on a small to mid-sized level," says Minya Quirk. 

Read More>