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At Facebook’s developer conference F8, the social network revealed several smaller ideas that build toward one really big one.
Yesterday, when Mark Zuckerberg took to the stage of F8—Facebook’s big development conference—he didn’t announce a big product consumers might care about, like Facebook Paper, or a new, multi-billion-dollar acquisition, like the texting app WhatsApp. 
Instead, he announced a series of small tweaks and developer tools that could change the way users play with apps, share content, and hop from screen to screen. It was a revealing look into a deeper strategy: 
Read More>
[Image: Facebook via 1000 Words / Shutterstock]

At Facebook’s developer conference F8, the social network revealed several smaller ideas that build toward one really big one.

Yesterday, when Mark Zuckerberg took to the stage of F8—Facebook’s big development conference—he didn’t announce a big product consumers might care about, like Facebook Paper, or a new, multi-billion-dollar acquisition, like the texting app WhatsApp

Instead, he announced a series of small tweaks and developer tools that could change the way users play with apps, share content, and hop from screen to screen. It was a revealing look into a deeper strategy: 

Read More>

[Image: Facebook via 1000 Words / Shutterstock]

theatlantic:

How We Grieve on Social Media

At 2:38 p.m. on September 9, 2013, Jeremy Fowler posted a picture of his family wearing bicycle helmets while standing in front of the split-rail fence of a horse corral in nowhere New Hampshire. The reflection of their washed out skin bespoke the 2.0 megapixels of Jeremy’s flip phone camera. It was a strange image to arrive on my Facebook newsfeed, a pixilated tribute to Jeremy’s father who died 48 hours earlier. It was Jeremy’s last photograph with all of family members present, a gesture of quixotic solemnity in a medium where the earnest so often do not belong.
He accompanied the picture with this status: “Yesterday my dad unexpectedly went to be with the Lord, we’re glad that he’s in a far better place than we are but we will miss him so much, plz pray for our family during this difficult time!” To date, the post has received 62 likes and 33 comments from some of his 459 friends. Most have said things like, “God be with y’all!!! We have and will continue to pray.”
Death, typically such a huge taboo, was now a subject fit for Facebook, with all its abbreviated spellings and exclamation marks.  
Read more. [Image: 55laney69/Flickr]

theatlantic:

How We Grieve on Social Media

At 2:38 p.m. on September 9, 2013, Jeremy Fowler posted a picture of his family wearing bicycle helmets while standing in front of the split-rail fence of a horse corral in nowhere New Hampshire. The reflection of their washed out skin bespoke the 2.0 megapixels of Jeremy’s flip phone camera. It was a strange image to arrive on my Facebook newsfeed, a pixilated tribute to Jeremy’s father who died 48 hours earlier. It was Jeremy’s last photograph with all of family members present, a gesture of quixotic solemnity in a medium where the earnest so often do not belong.

He accompanied the picture with this status: “Yesterday my dad unexpectedly went to be with the Lord, we’re glad that he’s in a far better place than we are but we will miss him so much, plz pray for our family during this difficult time!” To date, the post has received 62 likes and 33 comments from some of his 459 friends. Most have said things like, “God be with y’all!!! We have and will continue to pray.”

Death, typically such a huge taboo, was now a subject fit for Facebook, with all its abbreviated spellings and exclamation marks. 

Read more. [Image: 55laney69/Flickr]

On Thursday, Facebook announced FB Newswire, a tool aimed at helping journalists “find, share and embed newsworthy content from Facebook in the media they produce.”
The resource is powered by Storyful, which finds and verifies breaking news shared across social networks.

What kinds of news items will the FB Newswire cover? So far, it seems to be casting a wide net: Beyonce’s Time cover is posted alongside an update about Obama’s trip to Japan.
Read More>
[Image: Flickr user marcopako ]

On Thursday, Facebook announced FB Newswire, a tool aimed at helping journalists “find, share and embed newsworthy content from Facebook in the media they produce.”

The resource is powered by Storyful, which finds and verifies breaking news shared across social networks.

image

What kinds of news items will the FB Newswire cover? So far, it seems to be casting a wide net: Beyonce’s Time cover is posted alongside an update about Obama’s trip to Japan.

Read More>

[Image: Flickr user marcopako ]

Test participants who had used Facebook for 20 minutes reported being in a worse mood than those in two other test groups (one browsed the Internet, one served as a control and did nothing); the Facebook participants also felt their time had been used in a less meaningful way.

Amid the wreckage, behavioral researchers Sagioglou and Greitemeyer spotted a clue for why we go back: we think we’ll enjoy it. … Users seem to wrongly predict the emotional impact of using Facebook, Sagioglou tells Co.Design.

We Hate Ourselves For Spending So Much Time On Facebook. So Why Do We Do It?

Facebook is purchasing Oculus VR, maker of virtual reality gaming headset Oculus Rift, for $2 billion. Oculus has an enthusiastic developer community of engineers working to push the Rift—a piece of technology that isn’t even on the market yet—to its limits and to redefine what an entertainment experience can be. As Zuckerberg notes in his statement, “The Rift is highly anticipated by the gaming community, and there’s a lot of interest from developers in building for this platform.” Vibrant external developer communities can’t be purchased directly in cash or in stock options; they can only be bought by acquiring the technology ecosystems to which they are attracted. By acquiring Oculus, Facebook did just that. Developers working on Oculus through platforms like Unity are using it for everything from massively complicated adventure games to fully immersive journeys through Jerry Seinfeld’s apartment.