FastCompany Magazine

The official Tumblr of Fast Company.

James Schuler (19, Armonk, NY) started his first company when he was 12 and hasn’t stopped since. In high school he founded a health care company called Eligible and attended Y-Combinator as one of its youngest entrepreneurs. Recently, James left Eligible in order to focus on a bigger market: politics.Two years ago, Paypal founder and libertarian futuristPeter Thiel declared higher education “a bubble” and decided to give 22 bright young things $100,000 each to quit college. Today, he announced the third class of Thiel Fellows.
James Schuler (19, Armonk, NY) started his first company when he was 12 and hasn’t stopped since. In high school he founded a health care company called Eligible and attended Y-Combinator as one of its youngest entrepreneurs. Recently, James left Eligible in order to focus on a bigger market: politics.

Two years ago, Paypal founder and libertarian futuristPeter Thiel declared higher education “a bubble” and decided to give 22 bright young things $100,000 each to quit college. Today, he announced the third class of Thiel Fellows.
Come To College! Get Funded! Northeaster Offers The Nation’s Only Student-Run Venture Accelerator, Idea
Northeastern University has a student-run venture accelerator with $250k cash. Is this what it takes to keep kids on campus?
College is crazy expensive—and it’s getting more expensive all the time. Entrepreneurs like Peter Thiel are fond of saying it’s not worth it. But 23-year-old Chris Wolfel, who is getting his bachelor’s from Northeastern University this spring, found college to be not only a good investment, but the perfect launching pad for his entrepreneurial dreams.
For the last two years, Wolfel has been the CEO of IDEA, the only student-run venture accelerator in the country. Founded in 2009, IDEA offers workshops, meetups, coaching, mentoring, and most importantly, funding, all from alumni donors, for student startups. Wolfel and his team were able to raise $250,000 to help launch almost 300 businesses by students from every school across the university.
"Northeastern right now is one of the biggest hotbeds of entrepreneurship I’ve seen," says Wolfel. He points to the longstanding co-op model to explain why—Northeastern’s five-year bachelor’s degree program includes three six-month-long full-time internships, so "people come here knowing they’re going to work no matter what." For the last few years there’s even been a self-co-op model for student entrepreneurs to take time off to work on their own projects.
It could be said that IDEA is challenging the very idea of university education. 
Is the major purpose of convening a university and charging tuition to allow students to ponder the good life or expand the boundaries of human knowledge—or to turn collegians into entrepreneurs?
[Image: Flickr user Steve Jurvetson]

Come To College! Get Funded! Northeaster Offers The Nation’s Only Student-Run Venture Accelerator, Idea

Northeastern University has a student-run venture accelerator with $250k cash. Is this what it takes to keep kids on campus?

College is crazy expensive—and it’s getting more expensive all the time. Entrepreneurs like Peter Thiel are fond of saying it’s not worth it. But 23-year-old Chris Wolfel, who is getting his bachelor’s from Northeastern University this spring, found college to be not only a good investment, but the perfect launching pad for his entrepreneurial dreams.

For the last two years, Wolfel has been the CEO of IDEA, the only student-run venture accelerator in the country. Founded in 2009, IDEA offers workshops, meetups, coaching, mentoring, and most importantly, funding, all from alumni donors, for student startups. Wolfel and his team were able to raise $250,000 to help launch almost 300 businesses by students from every school across the university.

"Northeastern right now is one of the biggest hotbeds of entrepreneurship I’ve seen," says Wolfel. He points to the longstanding co-op model to explain why—Northeastern’s five-year bachelor’s degree program includes three six-month-long full-time internships, so "people come here knowing they’re going to work no matter what." For the last few years there’s even been a self-co-op model for student entrepreneurs to take time off to work on their own projects.

It could be said that IDEA is challenging the very idea of university education. 

Is the major purpose of convening a university and charging tuition to allow students to ponder the good life or expand the boundaries of human knowledge—or to turn collegians into entrepreneurs?

[Image: Flickr user Steve Jurvetson]

Here’s what the founder of the famous Babycakes vegan/gluten free bakery has to say about entrepreneurship. 

"If you are an entrepreneur at heart you are surely getting a ton of ideas, the key is to not be afraid of those ideas…"

And…

"All we can expect is the unexpected. Everything is going to go to hell and we’re gonna be fine. As long as the donuts still taste right." 

Here’s the story from Business Insider.

From our section THE TAKEAWAY:
How Jack Dorsey’s Lifelong Obsessions Became World Changing Companies
Jack Dorsey wasn’t your average kid in St. Louis. He had a speech impediment. He loved maps. He studied trains. He listened to the emergency dispatch center. And he noticed something interesting: Everybody was talking with short bursts of sound.
"They’re always talking about where they’re going, what they’re doing, and where they currently are," Dorsey recently told Lara Logan on 60 Minutes, “and that’s where the idea for Twitter came.”
The Takeaway: The dots will connect. Like Dorsey’s fascinations brought him from St. Louis to New York to Silicon Valley, entrepreneurial energy has a way of taking you into unexpected—and fitting—places.
Read the full story and see the video here.

From our section THE TAKEAWAY:

How Jack Dorsey’s Lifelong Obsessions Became World Changing Companies

Jack Dorsey wasn’t your average kid in St. Louis. He had a speech impediment. He loved maps. He studied trains. He listened to the emergency dispatch center. And he noticed something interesting: Everybody was talking with short bursts of sound.

"They’re always talking about where they’re going, what they’re doing, and where they currently are," Dorsey recently told Lara Logan on 60 Minutes, “and that’s where the idea for Twitter came.”

The Takeaway: The dots will connect. Like Dorsey’s fascinations brought him from St. Louis to New York to Silicon Valley, entrepreneurial energy has a way of taking you into unexpected—and fitting—places.

Read the full story and see the video here.

janemeskimang:

[VentureBeat] Some forward-thinking companies are looking to take innovation to the next level by giving employees the chance to launch their own companies while on the job. These new hybrid entrepreneur-employees — or “entre-ployees” — are poised to reshape the face of the tech industry.  Click here to read more…

(via janemeskimang-deactivated201309)