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“The traditional interview questions do not allow a candidate to demonstrate their uniqueness, personality, or dynamic skillsets,” explains Shara Senderoff of Intern Sushi, “I love to catch candidates off guard with the following:

  1. What color is your personality?
    This gives me a look into how a candidate views themselves without having to ask them for a list of adjectives. When you ask in this manner, you can identify traits about the candidate based on social interpretations of colors that may not have been apparent in that first interview, even when you can’t get a candidate to go into depth with his or her answer. I’ve also found this to be a great lead in question because it relaxes the candidate and allow them to think outside-of-the-box.

  2. Tell me three things you could do with a brick. 
    This always lends itself to very original thinking and believe it or not, demonstrates experience and maturity or lack thereof. At this point I could create a list of over 100 unique responses and with each response I can understand how an individual thinks and what they’ve been through.”

More odd but revealing interview questions

We don’t realize how likely it is for companies to fail because we mostly read about the ones that have crazy amounts of success. This blindspot gives us the impression that if you start an app that the kids will love, then you’ll be turning down billions from Facebook any day now. According to David McRaney, the brilliant curmudgeon behind You Are Not So Smart, this blind optimism is called survivorship bias. In this way, he says, dreams of Silicon Valley are similar to dreams of Hollywood.

Is Starting A Company A Terrible Decision?

Sometimes “fail fast” really just means failure. Here are three reasons we don’t always realize that we might be setting ourselves up to be let down.

“The problem we’re trying to solve ultimately is that we want to get more locally grown food in restaurants,” says Jolijt Tamanaha. “It’s not only farmers that struggle to get products sold, but it’s also restaurant chefs who want the best ingredients but struggle to find them.”
Wouldn’t it be great if buying locally farmed food were as easy as clicking “buy now” on Amazon? The creators of Farmplicity think so, too. Farmplicity is a Web-based marketplace that would connect St. Louis chefs with farmers in a 150-mile radius.

“The problem we’re trying to solve ultimately is that we want to get more locally grown food in restaurants,” says Jolijt Tamanaha. “It’s not only farmers that struggle to get products sold, but it’s also restaurant chefs who want the best ingredients but struggle to find them.”

Wouldn’t it be great if buying locally farmed food were as easy as clicking “buy now” on Amazon? The creators of Farmplicity think so, too. Farmplicity is a Web-based marketplace that would connect St. Louis chefs with farmers in a 150-mile radius.

If there’s a road that leads to perfect, the road that travels in the opposite direction leads to launching. Nothing will ever be perfect—not your product, service, messaging, etc. But the only real way to test it is by getting your work in front of people. Flaws can be adjusted, but the only way to find them is to get your work out there.

hyper-phobic entrepreneur Paul Jarvis on facing your fears in order to succeed

I think tackling my fear is important, because it makes me present and accountable to myself, and keeps me living a meaningful life by testing my limits and my potential. We have no idea what we’re capable of achieving unless we try things and stretch the limits in our minds.

How one entrepreneur faced his biggest fears and found hard-fought success

If Sarah Kauss turned back the pages of her journal to August 2010, she’d likely find an entry about a scorching day in the Sonoran Desert. With the sun beating down on her, all she wanted was a cold drink—but the water she carried was lukewarm from the heat. The experience gave her an idea that would change her life.

Two months later, a stylish, reusable bottle with the ability to keep liquid cold for up to 24 hours, otherwise known as the S’well bottle, was born.

Kauss still uses her journal every day, which serves as a reminder of the progress that she’s made over the years. With just a flip of a page, she can reflect on the highlights and learn from the hangups of her past, something that provides “a sense of positive momentum” as she moves forward.

How keeping a journal can help with productivity