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SHoP Architects, a young New York firm, has grand designs. The firm’s seven partners say they won’t be content to merely leave a mark on America’s most important skyline; they also want to transform the business of creating buildings. “Sometimes we joke,” says one partner, Vishaan Chakrabarti, “that the nearest precedent is McKim, Mead & White.”

It’s a nervy comparison for a New York architect to make, even in jest—a little like a pop group invoking Mozart—but SHoP has begun to back its ambitions with big commissions. Over the past few years, the firm has become the city’s go-to designer for complex, civically important projects. In November, when the owner of a controversial Manhattan waterfront scheme unveiled plans for a 50-story hotel and marina, SHoP was his architect. When Michael Bloomberg, the city’s previous mayor, announced a $1.1 billion mixed-income housing development, SHoP partners were at his side. There’s also an ultra-luxury midtown condo tower, 100 feet taller than the Empire State Building; a dockyard redevelopment around an old Brooklyn sugar factory; and even an outlet mall in blue-collar Staten Island, to be adjoined by the world’s tallest Ferris wheel.

Read more here.

Hue, a wireless lighting system, allows you to “tune” your lights to up to 16 million different colors. 
You can control them remotely so that you don’t walk into a dark house. You can adjust the color or intensity to increase concentration or relaxation, based on years of studies on the effect of light on human behavior. Hue can even produce gentle reminders, so that your hallway lights automatically turn blue on a rainy morning (Bring your umbrella today) or so your house lights dim steadily beginning at 8 a.m. (Time to catch the train). Thanks to LEDs’ ability to accept digital signals, in other words, home illumination isn’t only about seeing or feeling better. It is an atmospheric conveyor of information, too.
"We’ve been making lighting products for 120 years, and until last year, for the home, all they did was turn on and off. We thought: Why not do more with it than just turn it on or off?" 
How Philips altered the future of light

Hue, a wireless lighting system, allows you to “tune” your lights to up to 16 million different colors. 

You can control them remotely so that you don’t walk into a dark house. You can adjust the color or intensity to increase concentration or relaxation, based on years of studies on the effect of light on human behavior. Hue can even produce gentle reminders, so that your hallway lights automatically turn blue on a rainy morning (Bring your umbrella today) or so your house lights dim steadily beginning at 8 a.m. (Time to catch the train). Thanks to LEDs’ ability to accept digital signals, in other words, home illumination isn’t only about seeing or feeling better. It is an atmospheric conveyor of information, too.

"We’ve been making lighting products for 120 years, and until last year, for the home, all they did was turn on and off. We thought: Why not do more with it than just turn it on or off?" 

How Philips altered the future of light

This 4,400 square-foot desk creates hiding holes for an escape within the office.

One creative agency decided to reinvent the idea of a “desk” entirely. Instead of installing a metal slide or set of pinball machines, the New York-based Barbarian Group built one giant “superdesk” out of plywood and a single pour of resin. The whole thing stands at 4,400 square feet, and undulates throughout the space, creating regular desk-like slabs, but also oddly-shaped nooks and crannies.

“We really wanted everyone sitting under a desk, but we also wanted to create spaces where people could escape to.”

This “super slippery” coating will amaze you.
Also, it could eliminate roughly one million tons of food waste every year. We’re chatting live with the team of MIT scientists behind the stuff. Join us now.