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Forget Barbie. Why not have young girls play with Marie Curie?

Starting with a doll modeled after Nobel Prize winner Marie Curie, the line will feature strong female role models from history, along with an accompanying app that has new content for each doll. “It’s not just about getting girls excited about engineering. It’s important to show girls all the opportunities available to them,” says Hobbs.

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Forget Barbie. Why not have young girls play with Marie Curie?

Starting with a doll modeled after Nobel Prize winner Marie Curie, the line will feature strong female role models from history, along with an accompanying app that has new content for each doll. “It’s not just about getting girls excited about engineering. It’s important to show girls all the opportunities available to them,” says Hobbs.

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Cramming in a mind-melting series of visual allusions, the $3 million WTC logo is also an ad.
The World Trade Center has a new logo. Part of a $3.57 million branding endeavor, it’s a riff on space and negative space, presence, and absence. It’s like a Rubin vase test, playing tricks on the eye and asking viewers to see what they want to see. Which would almost be poetic if not for the fact that it could also be read as an ad for a luxury shopping mall.
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Cramming in a mind-melting series of visual allusions, the $3 million WTC logo is also an ad.

The World Trade Center has a new logo. Part of a $3.57 million branding endeavor, it’s a riff on space and negative space, presence, and absence. It’s like a Rubin vase test, playing tricks on the eye and asking viewers to see what they want to see. Which would almost be poetic if not for the fact that it could also be read as an ad for a luxury shopping mall.

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In honor of the man who created the iconic logos for IBM, UPS, and ABC, here’s a trove of Rand designs, interviews, and tributes.
Legendary graphic designer Paul Rand is revered as the creator of logos for corporations like IBM, ABC, UPS, and NeXT, and author of many books including the seminal, recently reissued Thoughts on Design. He passed away in 1996, but would have been 100 this week, and his legacy is still as strong as ever.
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In honor of the man who created the iconic logos for IBM, UPS, and ABC, here’s a trove of Rand designs, interviews, and tributes.

Legendary graphic designer Paul Rand is revered as the creator of logos for corporations like IBM, ABC, UPS, and NeXT, and author of many books including the seminal, recently reissued Thoughts on Design. He passed away in 1996, but would have been 100 this week, and his legacy is still as strong as ever.

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A Dutch designer imagines a better way to brand the Korean giant.
For 21 years, the Samsung name as served as the company logo, occasionally superimposed over a wobbly blue oval. It’s the kind of logo that’s fine on washing machines and televisions, but incredibly boring on something personal, like a smartphone. Never is this more apparent than when compared to the branding of Samsung’s arch-enemy in Cupertino, which is simply the silhouette of an apple.
Regardless, Samsung sells more smartphones and tablets than even Apple does. Doesn’t it deserve branding just as good?
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A Dutch designer imagines a better way to brand the Korean giant.

For 21 years, the Samsung name as served as the company logo, occasionally superimposed over a wobbly blue oval. It’s the kind of logo that’s fine on washing machines and televisions, but incredibly boring on something personal, like a smartphone. Never is this more apparent than when compared to the branding of Samsung’s arch-enemy in Cupertino, which is simply the silhouette of an apple.

Regardless, Samsung sells more smartphones and tablets than even Apple does. Doesn’t it deserve branding just as good?

Read More>

What if the jet of the future just replaced windows with cameras and giant digital displays?
The views afforded by the tiny airplane window—whether it’s cloud cover, city skylines, or mountain ranges—apparently aren’t good enough for design firm Technicon. Their French office has created a concept for a private jet called the Ixion that would replace windows with floor-to-ceiling digital screens that show passengers a high-resolution panoramic livestream of their external environment inside the cabin.

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What if the jet of the future just replaced windows with cameras and giant digital displays?

The views afforded by the tiny airplane window—whether it’s cloud cover, city skylines, or mountain ranges—apparently aren’t good enough for design firm Technicon. Their French office has created a concept for a private jet called the Ixion that would replace windows with floor-to-ceiling digital screens that show passengers a high-resolution panoramic livestream of their external environment inside the cabin.

Read More>

From a zen garden to a pet rabbit, at first, no silly luxury was spared for a co-working space set up by two Dutch designers. But soon, things started suspiciously changing, until the office was something out of 1984.
“After a while it became clear something strange was happening.”

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From a zen garden to a pet rabbit, at first, no silly luxury was spared for a co-working space set up by two Dutch designers. But soon, things started suspiciously changing, until the office was something out of 1984.

“After a while it became clear something strange was happening.”

Read More>

With this new design, parents can convert their toddler’s balance bike into a regular bike as he or she gets older.
Kid’s bikes don’t usually last very long. Depending on how quickly a child grows, it’s possible to go through as many as five different bike frame sizes by the age of 12, which can be expensive and leads to plenty of material waste. Switzerland-based designer Andreas Bhend is hoping kids can keep their bikes longer with his invention: a new bike that transforms when a toddler grows a couple of inches.
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With this new design, parents can convert their toddler’s balance bike into a regular bike as he or she gets older.

Kid’s bikes don’t usually last very long. Depending on how quickly a child grows, it’s possible to go through as many as five different bike frame sizes by the age of 12, which can be expensive and leads to plenty of material waste. Switzerland-based designer Andreas Bhend is hoping kids can keep their bikes longer with his invention: a new bike that transforms when a toddler grows a couple of inches.

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