FastCompany Magazine

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A healthier, brighter, more efficient world doesn’t just happen—it happens by design.
That’s proven by the finalists from our 2014 Innovation by Design competition, chosen from 1,587 boundary-pushing entries. All are listed here, and category winners will be announced at our conference in New York on October 15. 
Learn more at fastcodesign.com/ibd.

A healthier, brighter, more efficient world doesn’t just happen—it happens by design.

That’s proven by the finalists from our 2014 Innovation by Design competition, chosen from 1,587 boundary-pushing entries. All are listed here, and category winners will be announced at our conference in New York on October 15.

Learn more at fastcodesign.com/ibd.

“Tampon Run,” A Game From Two Teenagers Who Want You To Know That Periods Are Totally Normal
Two high school students have created a computer game that’s probably safe to say no game developer has ever bet money on before. There are no zombies, no AK-47s, no strippers. Instead, Tampon Run is a simple concept: Collect tampons, shoot them at your enemies, and don’t run out of them before your moon cycle is over.
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“Tampon Run,” A Game From Two Teenagers Who Want You To Know That Periods Are Totally Normal

Two high school students have created a computer game that’s probably safe to say no game developer has ever bet money on before. There are no zombies, no AK-47s, no strippers. Instead, Tampon Run is a simple concept: Collect tampons, shoot them at your enemies, and don’t run out of them before your moon cycle is over.

Read More>

Earlier this week we covered a bicycle that can’t be stolen because the lock is part of the frame. But what if you want to hack the bike you already have?
In the spirit of technology upgraders everywhere, we’ve whipped up a list of ways to enhance your ride with products and concepts that are available now or currently raising money via crowdfunding.
Read More>

Earlier this week we covered a bicycle that can’t be stolen because the lock is part of the frame. But what if you want to hack the bike you already have?

In the spirit of technology upgraders everywhere, we’ve whipped up a list of ways to enhance your ride with products and concepts that are available now or currently raising money via crowdfunding.

Read More>

In 2012 the Pebble smartwatch became the most backed product in Kickstarter history, gaining $10.3 million during its fundraising period.
That record stood until yesterday, when another product smashed Pebble’s pledges—earning an astonishing $11,045,769 (and counting) for a Kickstarter project that still has around 24 hours on the clock.
The project? The Coolest Cooler: a $299 USB-enabled, Buetooth speaker-pumping, illuminated, partitioned, accessory-holding cooler featuring an onboard blender. It is, to put it simply, the most incredible story in crowdfunding history—and made all the more amazing by the fact that Portland-based creator Ryan Grepper only set out to raise $50,000.
So how did a glorified drinks holder become a Kickstarter record breaker?
Read More>

In 2012 the Pebble smartwatch became the most backed product in Kickstarter history, gaining $10.3 million during its fundraising period.

That record stood until yesterday, when another product smashed Pebble’s pledges—earning an astonishing $11,045,769 (and counting) for a Kickstarter project that still has around 24 hours on the clock.

The project? The Coolest Cooler: a $299 USB-enabled, Buetooth speaker-pumping, illuminated, partitioned, accessory-holding cooler featuring an onboard blender. It is, to put it simply, the most incredible story in crowdfunding history—and made all the more amazing by the fact that Portland-based creator Ryan Grepper only set out to raise $50,000.

So how did a glorified drinks holder become a Kickstarter record breaker?

Read More>

Box SVP Sam Schillace shares how he quickly and cheaply experimented on an app no one wanted—that became the basis for Google Docs.

Schillace says that even at companies focused on innovation, it’s hard to convince others of the value of truly new things. “Whenever you see something that’s truly creative or disruptive, it challenges your worldview. And when you’re challenged like that, you have a choice either to accept the challenge, meaning that you are in some way wrong, or reject it, which is saying that the thing itself is wrong. So it’s very rare that people will say, ‘Oh I must be stupid because I didn’t see this,’ so usually people’s first reaction is to reject them.”

Read More>

Box SVP Sam Schillace shares how he quickly and cheaply experimented on an app no one wanted—that became the basis for Google Docs.

Schillace says that even at companies focused on innovation, it’s hard to convince others of the value of truly new things. “Whenever you see something that’s truly creative or disruptive, it challenges your worldview. And when you’re challenged like that, you have a choice either to accept the challenge, meaning that you are in some way wrong, or reject it, which is saying that the thing itself is wrong. So it’s very rare that people will say, ‘Oh I must be stupid because I didn’t see this,’ so usually people’s first reaction is to reject them.”

Read More>

Tweaking the UX of our social media tools could help readers better understand fast-moving news.
The Boston Marathon bombings. Tornadoes in the Midwest. Now, tragically, Ferguson. When serious breaking news happens, many of us turn to social media—especially Twitter—to keep up and get the most detailed information we can as quickly as possible. But the events in Missouri these last few weeks made me think about the deficiencies of our current information tools, and how we might improve the social, breaking news experience.
Read More>

Tweaking the UX of our social media tools could help readers better understand fast-moving news.

The Boston Marathon bombings. Tornadoes in the Midwest. Now, tragically, Ferguson. When serious breaking news happens, many of us turn to social media—especially Twitter—to keep up and get the most detailed information we can as quickly as possible. But the events in Missouri these last few weeks made me think about the deficiencies of our current information tools, and how we might improve the social, breaking news experience.

Read More>

A designer’s guide to improving end-of-life care.
The world’s population is aging. The World Health Organization estimates that by 2050, the proportion of people 60 years or older in the world will have doubled, from 11% in 2000 to 22% (2 billion people) in 2050. This makes services for the elderly, like hospice care, which seeks to ease the pain (physical and emotional) of terminally ill patients and their families in their last days, even more important.
The problem is, we tend to avoid talking about death and dying, and people don’t always make plans in advance for end-of-life care. And as it stands, today’s hospice care system can be can be impersonal, under-resourced and under-staffed, and plagued with communication issues between care workers, patients, and families. In some cases, the people who provide palliative care are also paid criminally low wages. In the U.S., home hospice care work only recently stopped being classified as “companionship,” meaning workers didn’t qualify for federal labor protections.

Singapore- and Barcelona-based health care design consultancy fuelfor spent nine months researching hospice care and its issues in Singapore, where the designers found hospice to be an “invisible and avoided service.” Commissioned by the Lien Foundation, a Singapore-based philanthropy, and the ACM Foundation, a funeral service company, fuelfor came up with a handful of strategies to improve the way hospice care is run, both in Singapore and in the rest of the world.
The Hospitable Hospice handbook (which won a 2014 International Design Excellence Award) redesigns not only the look and function of hospice care facilities, but also how hospice workers communicate with each other, how people learn about and experience the hospice process, and how people pay for care. Here are seven of their suggestions for better care:
Read More>

A designer’s guide to improving end-of-life care.

The world’s population is aging. The World Health Organization estimates that by 2050, the proportion of people 60 years or older in the world will have doubled, from 11% in 2000 to 22% (2 billion people) in 2050. This makes services for the elderly, like hospice care, which seeks to ease the pain (physical and emotional) of terminally ill patients and their families in their last days, even more important.

The problem is, we tend to avoid talking about death and dying, and people don’t always make plans in advance for end-of-life care. And as it stands, today’s hospice care system can be can be impersonal, under-resourced and under-staffed, and plagued with communication issues between care workers, patients, and families. In some cases, the people who provide palliative care are also paid criminally low wages. In the U.S., home hospice care work only recently stopped being classified as “companionship,” meaning workers didn’t qualify for federal labor protections.

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Singapore- and Barcelona-based health care design consultancy fuelfor spent nine months researching hospice care and its issues in Singapore, where the designers found hospice to be an “invisible and avoided service.” Commissioned by the Lien Foundation, a Singapore-based philanthropy, and the ACM Foundation, a funeral service company, fuelfor came up with a handful of strategies to improve the way hospice care is run, both in Singapore and in the rest of the world.

The Hospitable Hospice handbook (which won a 2014 International Design Excellence Award) redesigns not only the look and function of hospice care facilities, but also how hospice workers communicate with each other, how people learn about and experience the hospice process, and how people pay for care. Here are seven of their suggestions for better care:

Read More>