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All trendy menus looked basically the same—until San Francisco’s Trick Dog came along with these stunners.

America’s restaurants and bars cater to a thousand different varieties of palate and preference—lovers of offal, whisky aficionados, those who prefer things pickled and on small plates, and so on. But the humble menu has not caught up in terms of variety and inventiveness. Far too many of them, in fact, look exactly like this.
And then there is Trick Dog…
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All trendy menus looked basically the same—until San Francisco’s Trick Dog came along with these stunners.

America’s restaurants and bars cater to a thousand different varieties of palate and preference—lovers of offal, whisky aficionados, those who prefer things pickled and on small plates, and so on. But the humble menu has not caught up in terms of variety and inventiveness. Far too many of them, in fact, look exactly like this.

And then there is Trick Dog…

Read More>

If you condense the images of the Internet, you get an orange smear. But nobody is sure why.
Today, Jim Bumgardner is the director of application development at Disney Interactive Labs. But almost 10 years ago, he stumbled across a puzzle that would confound him. When layering hundreds of Flickr photos, he found that, again and again, the images became a consistent, bronze blur. He named his montages Bronze Shields. They looked like pizza shells.
To this date, neither Bumgardner nor anyone else has proven why the images of the Internet, when layered and averaged together en masse, round down into a tarnished orange glow Bumgardner dubbed “emergent orange.” But Bumgardner, collecting ideas from researchers and peers across the web, has suggested four theories:
Read More>

If you condense the images of the Internet, you get an orange smear. But nobody is sure why.

Today, Jim Bumgardner is the director of application development at Disney Interactive Labs. But almost 10 years ago, he stumbled across a puzzle that would confound him. When layering hundreds of Flickr photos, he found that, again and again, the images became a consistent, bronze blur. He named his montages Bronze Shields. They looked like pizza shells.

To this date, neither Bumgardner nor anyone else has proven why the images of the Internet, when layered and averaged together en masse, round down into a tarnished orange glow Bumgardner dubbed “emergent orange.” But Bumgardner, collecting ideas from researchers and peers across the web, has suggested four theories:

Read More>

Firstborn’s Dan LaCivita argues that technology alone isn’t enough to prevent a preventable tragedy and issues a call for the marketing industry, startups, and others to get involved.
Each year, we hear the headlines on television news, read the stories online at our desks, and discuss the details around our kitchen tables. We shake our heads in sadness, we hug our children tighter, and we fail to comprehend how a parent or a caretaker could just … forget.
I was in one of those places, my dinner table, when my own family began discussing one of the most recent tragedies—two-year-old Cooper Harris—and his murky, but still senseless death. As my own 20-month-old son, Eli, ate (well, played with) his own dinner nearby, my wife, my mother and I discussed how this sort of thing can still happen. We asked, why, with all the amazing technology that we have in this world, is there not something for a parent to purchase to prevent this from accidentally happening to their son or daughter? Why isn’t there a device or product that has the ability to save the lives of 38 children each year?
Turns out, there are a lot of reasons why. And none of them are very good. Here are some of these “barriers” I uncovered and who can help break them down:
Read More>

Firstborn’s Dan LaCivita argues that technology alone isn’t enough to prevent a preventable tragedy and issues a call for the marketing industry, startups, and others to get involved.

Each year, we hear the headlines on television news, read the stories online at our desks, and discuss the details around our kitchen tables. We shake our heads in sadness, we hug our children tighter, and we fail to comprehend how a parent or a caretaker could just … forget.

I was in one of those places, my dinner table, when my own family began discussing one of the most recent tragedies—two-year-old Cooper Harris—and his murky, but still senseless death. As my own 20-month-old son, Eli, ate (well, played with) his own dinner nearby, my wife, my mother and I discussed how this sort of thing can still happen. We asked, why, with all the amazing technology that we have in this world, is there not something for a parent to purchase to prevent this from accidentally happening to their son or daughter? Why isn’t there a device or product that has the ability to save the lives of 38 children each year?

Turns out, there are a lot of reasons why. And none of them are very good. Here are some of these “barriers” I uncovered and who can help break them down:

Read More>

Ka-Pow! Watch These Fish Cannons Shoot Salmon Safely Over Dams

Salmon have serious swimming skills—some travel thousands of miles to return to their original homes to breed. But even though they can jump as high as 12 feet in the air, they can’t manage to get over massive concrete dams that we have built to block their journeys back to their homes. Now one new idea could give them a boost. The plan involves whisking the fish through a long vacuum tube at speeds up to 22 miles per hour and then shooting them out the other end like a cannon.

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Liquid calories be gone! Sugary drinks have nowhere to hide with Vessyl, a cup with sensors that measures and reads out calories and nutritional info in beverages. 
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Liquid calories be gone! Sugary drinks have nowhere to hide with Vessyl, a cup with sensors that measures and reads out calories and nutritional info in beverages. 

Read More>

Forget Barbie. Why not have young girls play with Marie Curie?

Starting with a doll modeled after Nobel Prize winner Marie Curie, the line will feature strong female role models from history, along with an accompanying app that has new content for each doll. “It’s not just about getting girls excited about engineering. It’s important to show girls all the opportunities available to them,” says Hobbs.

Read More>

Forget Barbie. Why not have young girls play with Marie Curie?

Starting with a doll modeled after Nobel Prize winner Marie Curie, the line will feature strong female role models from history, along with an accompanying app that has new content for each doll. “It’s not just about getting girls excited about engineering. It’s important to show girls all the opportunities available to them,” says Hobbs.

Read More>