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A designer’s guide to improving end-of-life care.
The world’s population is aging. The World Health Organization estimates that by 2050, the proportion of people 60 years or older in the world will have doubled, from 11% in 2000 to 22% (2 billion people) in 2050. This makes services for the elderly, like hospice care, which seeks to ease the pain (physical and emotional) of terminally ill patients and their families in their last days, even more important.
The problem is, we tend to avoid talking about death and dying, and people don’t always make plans in advance for end-of-life care. And as it stands, today’s hospice care system can be can be impersonal, under-resourced and under-staffed, and plagued with communication issues between care workers, patients, and families. In some cases, the people who provide palliative care are also paid criminally low wages. In the U.S., home hospice care work only recently stopped being classified as “companionship,” meaning workers didn’t qualify for federal labor protections.

Singapore- and Barcelona-based health care design consultancy fuelfor spent nine months researching hospice care and its issues in Singapore, where the designers found hospice to be an “invisible and avoided service.” Commissioned by the Lien Foundation, a Singapore-based philanthropy, and the ACM Foundation, a funeral service company, fuelfor came up with a handful of strategies to improve the way hospice care is run, both in Singapore and in the rest of the world.
The Hospitable Hospice handbook (which won a 2014 International Design Excellence Award) redesigns not only the look and function of hospice care facilities, but also how hospice workers communicate with each other, how people learn about and experience the hospice process, and how people pay for care. Here are seven of their suggestions for better care:
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A designer’s guide to improving end-of-life care.

The world’s population is aging. The World Health Organization estimates that by 2050, the proportion of people 60 years or older in the world will have doubled, from 11% in 2000 to 22% (2 billion people) in 2050. This makes services for the elderly, like hospice care, which seeks to ease the pain (physical and emotional) of terminally ill patients and their families in their last days, even more important.

The problem is, we tend to avoid talking about death and dying, and people don’t always make plans in advance for end-of-life care. And as it stands, today’s hospice care system can be can be impersonal, under-resourced and under-staffed, and plagued with communication issues between care workers, patients, and families. In some cases, the people who provide palliative care are also paid criminally low wages. In the U.S., home hospice care work only recently stopped being classified as “companionship,” meaning workers didn’t qualify for federal labor protections.

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Singapore- and Barcelona-based health care design consultancy fuelfor spent nine months researching hospice care and its issues in Singapore, where the designers found hospice to be an “invisible and avoided service.” Commissioned by the Lien Foundation, a Singapore-based philanthropy, and the ACM Foundation, a funeral service company, fuelfor came up with a handful of strategies to improve the way hospice care is run, both in Singapore and in the rest of the world.

The Hospitable Hospice handbook (which won a 2014 International Design Excellence Award) redesigns not only the look and function of hospice care facilities, but also how hospice workers communicate with each other, how people learn about and experience the hospice process, and how people pay for care. Here are seven of their suggestions for better care:

Read More>

fastcodesign:

This New Moleskine Is Like An iPad Made Of Paper

Ask companies like Adobe and Fiftythree, and they’ll tell you that tablets are the future of drawing. Give in, and get used to the concept of touching a stylus to your screen. Because as hardware and software get better, you’ll be able to create the sorts of things you can only dream about creating on paper.

Moleskine—the preeminent journal company with no lack of self-interest in keeping paper alive—has presented the vision of another possible future.

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Can This Chairless Chair for Your Butt Make You More Productive?
Sitting is killing us. Or wait, maybe it’s standing. Yes, standing can be unhealthy, too. That’s according to the designers of the “chairless chair,” a half-stand, half-sit piece of furniture that will make life less terrible for workers who carry out long shifts on their feet. By taking weight off the joints and lower back, Swiss industrial design house Noonee contends that the chairless chair will decrease fatigue and increase productivity.
Read More>

Can This Chairless Chair for Your Butt Make You More Productive?

Sitting is killing us. Or wait, maybe it’s standing. Yes, standing can be unhealthy, too. That’s according to the designers of the “chairless chair,” a half-stand, half-sit piece of furniture that will make life less terrible for workers who carry out long shifts on their feet. By taking weight off the joints and lower back, Swiss industrial design house Noonee contends that the chairless chair will decrease fatigue and increase productivity.

Read More>

When the San Francisco Bay Area suffered its worst earthquake in 25 years on Sunday, with a 6.0 rattler in the Napa Valley, one company found themselves in an unusual place to collect data on the tragedy: Wireless device maker Jawbone.
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When the San Francisco Bay Area suffered its worst earthquake in 25 years on Sunday, with a 6.0 rattler in the Napa Valley, one company found themselves in an unusual place to collect data on the tragedy: Wireless device maker Jawbone.

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A group of kids has created an app to combat the police abuses seen in Ferguson, and everywhere else.

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The app, called Five-O, is like a detailed version of Yelp for the police. (It’s worth noting that the Ferguson Police Department already has a dismal one-star review on Yelp). After any interaction, someone can answer questions like “Was the stop legitimate?” and “Were you physically assaulted?” and give the officer a grade from A to F. App users can also view scores for a particular department, or browse through departments by county or state.

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