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First standing desks, then walking desks. Now this?
Productivity seekers intimidated by treadmill desks can now thank the Kickstarter gods for Cubii, an elliptical desk companion. Much like the fitness machine found at your local gym, Cubii is a low-impact way to feel like you’re doing exercise. And, unlike treadmill desks, which can cost upwards of $1,000 and barely fit in a cubicle, Cubii slides right under your desk and retails for $350.
It’s a pretty simple concept: To deter the effects of Sedentary Death Syndrome, just pedal. It comes with an app to track progress. (Of course it does.)
Cubii has received more than $80,000 in funding, exceeding its Kickstarter goal.
Let us count the ways this is absurd.
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First standing desks, then walking desks. Now this?

Productivity seekers intimidated by treadmill desks can now thank the Kickstarter gods for Cubii, an elliptical desk companion. Much like the fitness machine found at your local gym, Cubii is a low-impact way to feel like you’re doing exercise. And, unlike treadmill desks, which can cost upwards of $1,000 and barely fit in a cubicle, Cubii slides right under your desk and retails for $350.

It’s a pretty simple concept: To deter the effects of Sedentary Death Syndrome, just pedal. It comes with an app to track progress. (Of course it does.)

Cubii has received more than $80,000 in funding, exceeding its Kickstarter goal.

Let us count the ways this is absurd.

Read More>

The problem with wearables is that usually people stop wearing them. According to one recent report, one-third of users of activity-tracking wearables, like the Fitbit and the Jawbone, toss their devices aside after just six months.
To overcome this, a small cadre of companies has been furiously working to develop smaller, sleeker, more discreet devices that monitor health and wellness—in the form of temporary tattoos, band-aids, and ingestible pills.

Read More>

The problem with wearables is that usually people stop wearing them. According to one recent report, one-third of users of activity-tracking wearables, like the Fitbit and the Jawbone, toss their devices aside after just six months.

To overcome this, a small cadre of companies has been furiously working to develop smaller, sleeker, more discreet devices that monitor health and wellness—in the form of temporary tattoos, band-aids, and ingestible pills.

Read More>

Bill Murray has played an incredible array of characters across a career spanning 74 movies and TV shows. Peter Venkman. Ernie McCracken. Herman Blume. Garfield. Bill Murray. Bill Murray. Bill Murray.
In tribute, San Francisco’s Public Works gallery will host The Murray Affair on August 8 ($12), a one-day show that will feature as many as 200 original portraits of Bill Murray submitted from an open call of non-commissioned artists. Organizer Ezra Croft, who has, in the past, hosted a similar celebration of Nicolas Cage, cites Murray’s “awesome catalogue of greatness” as his muse for the event.
Read More>

Bill Murray has played an incredible array of characters across a career spanning 74 movies and TV shows. Peter Venkman. Ernie McCracken. Herman Blume. Garfield. Bill Murray. Bill Murray. Bill Murray.

In tribute, San Francisco’s Public Works gallery will host The Murray Affair on August 8 ($12), a one-day show that will feature as many as 200 original portraits of Bill Murray submitted from an open call of non-commissioned artists. Organizer Ezra Croft, who has, in the past, hosted a similar celebration of Nicolas Cage, cites Murray’s “awesome catalogue of greatness” as his muse for the event.

Read More>

fastcodesign:

How The Television Has Evolved
The television counts among a handful of designs that most dramatically changed 20th-century society. As this illustrated poster by Reddit user CaptnChristiana visualizes, the design has evolved mightily since the boxy retro contraptions of yesteryear, like the Emyvisor and the Marconi. With flatscreens and high-definition displays that can seem crisper and more colorful than reality itself, 21st-century viewers are comparatively spoiled.
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fastcodesign:

How The Television Has Evolved

The television counts among a handful of designs that most dramatically changed 20th-century society. As this illustrated poster by Reddit user CaptnChristiana visualizes, the design has evolved mightily since the boxy retro contraptions of yesteryear, like the Emyvisor and the Marconi. With flatscreens and high-definition displays that can seem crisper and more colorful than reality itself, 21st-century viewers are comparatively spoiled.

Read More>