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This office is designed specifically to make people feel… at ease. 

"You’re looking for what is that unique insight, that point of view, that thing that no one else sees. If you can create a conversation where that can really come out, and can give them the comfort to put as much of themselves out on the table as possible, you learn a lot more about them."

Paul Cocksedge’s Shade lamp for Flos isn’t just a revival of the endangered lampshade. It aims much higher: “A new lighting category has been created,” he tells Co.Design, “by taking away the traditional electrical wires and replacing them with a very thin cord that’s almost invisible to the eye.”

Paul Cocksedge’s Shade lamp for Flos isn’t just a revival of the endangered lampshade. It aims much higher: “A new lighting category has been created,” he tells Co.Design, “by taking away the traditional electrical wires and replacing them with a very thin cord that’s almost invisible to the eye.”

Take a tour of Google’s new Dublin HQ

Google’s Dublin flagship covers 47,000 square meters of pricey downtown real estate. The offices are spread across four buildings, though the campus’s central building has been attracting the most attention. Designed by architecture firm Camenzind Evolution, the main offices occupy 14 floors of a jet-black Miesian tower; they’re linked by spunky, brightly colored interiors and in-your-face design cues. The vertical operations are packed to the gills with amenities, all meant to keep you inside for as long as possible. Employees have their pick of five restaurants; can preuse new products at various on-site tech shops; and have access to 42 kitchenettes, a fitness center, a game room, and an 82-meter swimming pool.

A house powered by exercise? 

The JF-Kit House by the Spanish design firm Elii is an experiment in “domestic fitness,” rendering “the image of a possible future where citizens produce part of their domestic energy requirements with their own physical activities.” Each room features a fancifully named exercise station that would, theoretically, help create energy to power the home, including an “arm workout bureau,” a “spinning kitchen,” and a “triceps greenhouse.” A video shows the home’s imagined inhabitant lifting weights, cycling, and doing calisthenics as part of his house’s everyday upkeep and daily chores like cooking.

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