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theatlantic:

How We Grieve on Social Media

At 2:38 p.m. on September 9, 2013, Jeremy Fowler posted a picture of his family wearing bicycle helmets while standing in front of the split-rail fence of a horse corral in nowhere New Hampshire. The reflection of their washed out skin bespoke the 2.0 megapixels of Jeremy’s flip phone camera. It was a strange image to arrive on my Facebook newsfeed, a pixilated tribute to Jeremy’s father who died 48 hours earlier. It was Jeremy’s last photograph with all of family members present, a gesture of quixotic solemnity in a medium where the earnest so often do not belong.
He accompanied the picture with this status: “Yesterday my dad unexpectedly went to be with the Lord, we’re glad that he’s in a far better place than we are but we will miss him so much, plz pray for our family during this difficult time!” To date, the post has received 62 likes and 33 comments from some of his 459 friends. Most have said things like, “God be with y’all!!! We have and will continue to pray.”
Death, typically such a huge taboo, was now a subject fit for Facebook, with all its abbreviated spellings and exclamation marks.  
Read more. [Image: 55laney69/Flickr]

theatlantic:

How We Grieve on Social Media

At 2:38 p.m. on September 9, 2013, Jeremy Fowler posted a picture of his family wearing bicycle helmets while standing in front of the split-rail fence of a horse corral in nowhere New Hampshire. The reflection of their washed out skin bespoke the 2.0 megapixels of Jeremy’s flip phone camera. It was a strange image to arrive on my Facebook newsfeed, a pixilated tribute to Jeremy’s father who died 48 hours earlier. It was Jeremy’s last photograph with all of family members present, a gesture of quixotic solemnity in a medium where the earnest so often do not belong.

He accompanied the picture with this status: “Yesterday my dad unexpectedly went to be with the Lord, we’re glad that he’s in a far better place than we are but we will miss him so much, plz pray for our family during this difficult time!” To date, the post has received 62 likes and 33 comments from some of his 459 friends. Most have said things like, “God be with y’all!!! We have and will continue to pray.”

Death, typically such a huge taboo, was now a subject fit for Facebook, with all its abbreviated spellings and exclamation marks. 

Read more. [Image: 55laney69/Flickr]

What If You Died At 38 But No One Found You For 3 Years?   An absorbing new companion website to a documentary about Joyce Vincent asks uncomfortable questions about life, death, and loneliness.

What If You Died At 38 But No One Found You For 3 Years? An absorbing new companion website to a documentary about Joyce Vincent asks uncomfortable questions about life, death, and loneliness.

Funeral homes of the future… today? Co. Design looks at a strikingly minimalist funeral home in Spain, where death is still a drag but hey, at least you’re going out in style!


It doesn’t have to be that way, as a striking new funeral parlor in coastal Spain demonstrates. The Funeral Home and Garden in Pinoso, by COR architects, is audaciously modern, a low-slung boxy thing tucked into a hillside, with a shiny black edifice that’d look terribly morose if not broken up by courtyards and generous stretches of glass.
Indoors, the funeral home is bright white and sparsely decorated with the sort of furniture you might find in the cafe of a modern-art museum. Even the chapel — the nerve center of mourning — manages to look light and airy with an all-white paint job and lots of clerestories.
A chic funeral parlor may seem a bit… misguided. After all, who thinks about architecture after losing a loved one? But that’s precisely what makes this design great: You don’t think about it. It’s so minimal and non-oppressive, it takes a back seat to your bereavement, at least that’s the idea.
Per the architects’ press release: “We understand this building as a place that will resist being forgotten, remaining in the retinas of their users, and therefore a place where the sensitive realm has to be controlled. Parameters such as sound, temperature, light, humidity, lighting, privacy, relationship with nature become very important.

” We worry that all those windows might make some people feel like they’re on display. But we’d take that over an orgy of mahogany any day.


Full slideshow when you click through. A way to start off your day!

Funeral homes of the future… today? Co. Design looks at a strikingly minimalist funeral home in Spain, where death is still a drag but hey, at least you’re going out in style!

It doesn’t have to be that way, as a striking new funeral parlor in coastal Spain demonstrates. The Funeral Home and Garden in Pinoso, by COR architects, is audaciously modern, a low-slung boxy thing tucked into a hillside, with a shiny black edifice that’d look terribly morose if not broken up by courtyards and generous stretches of glass.

Indoors, the funeral home is bright white and sparsely decorated with the sort of furniture you might find in the cafe of a modern-art museum. Even the chapel — the nerve center of mourning — manages to look light and airy with an all-white paint job and lots of clerestories.

A chic funeral parlor may seem a bit… misguided. After all, who thinks about architecture after losing a loved one? But that’s precisely what makes this design great: You don’t think about it. It’s so minimal and non-oppressive, it takes a back seat to your bereavement, at least that’s the idea.

Per the architects’ press release: “We understand this building as a place that will resist being forgotten, remaining in the retinas of their users, and therefore a place where the sensitive realm has to be controlled. Parameters such as sound, temperature, light, humidity, lighting, privacy, relationship with nature become very important.

” We worry that all those windows might make some people feel like they’re on display. But we’d take that over an orgy of mahogany any day.

Full slideshow when you click through. A way to start off your day!