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In the report, the cyber security company predicted that the first death-by-Internet-of-Things would occur by the end of 2014. It cited former vice president Dick Cheney turning off his pacemaker for fear of remote tampering, conspiracies surrounding the sudden death of journalist Michael Hastings, and an FDA warning about Internet-connected medical devices as reason for their fears.

An “Internet Murder” Could Happen By The End of This Year
Cecilia Abadie, a Google Glass Explorer and resident of California, Land of the Technologically Free, is sparking a big debate on her Google Plus page right now after she scanned a photo of a ticket she got last night for wearing Google Glass while driving.
According to the ticket, the precise charge against Abadie is “Driving with monitor visible to driver (Google Glass).” Abadie was first pulled over for speeding, which she received a citation for and claims was justified. But she adds, “The cop was being really nasty and asking me again and again why I was wearing Google Glass in the car.”
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Cecilia Abadie, a Google Glass Explorer and resident of California, Land of the Technologically Free, is sparking a big debate on her Google Plus page right now after she scanned a photo of a ticket she got last night for wearing Google Glass while driving.

According to the ticket, the precise charge against Abadie is “Driving with monitor visible to driver (Google Glass).” Abadie was first pulled over for speeding, which she received a citation for and claims was justified. But she adds, “The cop was being really nasty and asking me again and again why I was wearing Google Glass in the car.”

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Plant a Tree; Lower the Crime Rate
Does a greener neighborhood give criminals more places to hide, or do green spaces keep crime down? This was an actual debate that seems to now be resolved.
When it comes to controlling crime, police tend to favor more policing, while social scientists see the symptom of deeper, social problems. Urban planners, on the other hand, focus on the trees.
Here’s the story.

Plant a Tree; Lower the Crime Rate

Does a greener neighborhood give criminals more places to hide, or do green spaces keep crime down? This was an actual debate that seems to now be resolved.

When it comes to controlling crime, police tend to favor more policing, while social scientists see the symptom of deeper, social problems. Urban planners, on the other hand, focus on the trees.

Here’s the story.

The thing about Apple’s iPad Mini, you see, is it’s small. That fact, among others, allowed iCrooks to steal about 3,600—or $1.5 million worth—of the new devices during a brazen heist at New York’s JFK airport on Monday.

The thing about Apple’s iPad Mini, you see, is it’s small. That fact, among others, allowed iCrooks to steal about 3,600—or $1.5 million worth—of the new devices during a brazen heist at New York’s JFK airport on Monday.

MAYHEM ON CRAIGSLIST. HIDE YOUR WIFE, HIDE YOUR KIDS. (Ugh, sorry for the meme, but it is SO fitting.) Are your kids safe if they use Craigslist? Maybe!


All in all, the report, which is hilariously titled “Crime and Craigslist: A Sad Tale of Murders and More,” discovered 330 crimes related to Craigslist in the past year—a figure researchers called “staggering.”
A spokesperson for Craigslist appropriately took a different perspective. “[It’s] probably worth considering we had over 573 million postings on Craigslist last year in North America,” the spokesperson said. “What are the odds?”
The odds, you ask? On average, around 0.00005% of posts are associated with crimes on Craigslist—not that you would get that impression from Oodle’s report, which is filled with innuendo and exaggerated implications. So the report will acknowledge that Craigslist has no control over its users—before launching into a 50-page listing of rapes, murders, and assaults occurring because of Craigslist. Its wink-wink research, intended to foster an atmosphere of doom and gloom around the service. “It’s important to emphasize that Craigslist has no control over the actions of its users,” the report reads. “Even so, the number, volume and scope of the incidents speak for themselves.”



So yeah, you can get killed if you use Craigslist, but you can get killed if you insult Tom Brady in a Boston bar. It’s a tough world out there.

MAYHEM ON CRAIGSLIST. HIDE YOUR WIFE, HIDE YOUR KIDS. (Ugh, sorry for the meme, but it is SO fitting.) Are your kids safe if they use Craigslist? Maybe!

All in all, the report, which is hilariously titled “Crime and Craigslist: A Sad Tale of Murders and More,” discovered 330 crimes related to Craigslist in the past year—a figure researchers called “staggering.”

A spokesperson for Craigslist appropriately took a different perspective. “[It’s] probably worth considering we had over 573 million postings on Craigslist last year in North America,” the spokesperson said. “What are the odds?”

The odds, you ask? On average, around 0.00005% of posts are associated with crimes on Craigslist—not that you would get that impression from Oodle’s report, which is filled with innuendo and exaggerated implications. So the report will acknowledge that Craigslist has no control over its users—before launching into a 50-page listing of rapes, murders, and assaults occurring because of Craigslist. Its wink-wink research, intended to foster an atmosphere of doom and gloom around the service. “It’s important to emphasize that Craigslist has no control over the actions of its users,” the report reads. “Even so, the number, volume and scope of the incidents speak for themselves.”

So yeah, you can get killed if you use Craigslist, but you can get killed if you insult Tom Brady in a Boston bar. It’s a tough world out there.

Behold: A technology capable of spotting that peculiar criminal, the arsonist, in a large crowd. The “Questionable Observer Detector” (QoD) tracks faces at multiple crime scenes.

The idea here is that the criminal may be hanging out in the crowd that  gathers after the event. In fact, arsonists are known to lurk within the  crowd at the scene of a burning building; they are, in effect, watching  their work in progress. Kevin W. Bowyer, a computer vision expert at  Notre Dame, hit upon the idea of creating a practical tool to process  all the available video clips of similar events, to see if it might spot  someone turning up unusually often as part of the crowd, giving  authorities a possible lead.

Behold: A technology capable of spotting that peculiar criminal, the arsonist, in a large crowd. The “Questionable Observer Detector” (QoD) tracks faces at multiple crime scenes.

The idea here is that the criminal may be hanging out in the crowd that gathers after the event. In fact, arsonists are known to lurk within the crowd at the scene of a burning building; they are, in effect, watching their work in progress. Kevin W. Bowyer, a computer vision expert at Notre Dame, hit upon the idea of creating a practical tool to process all the available video clips of similar events, to see if it might spot someone turning up unusually often as part of the crowd, giving authorities a possible lead.