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In this way we get “brain hubs,” places that contribute an outsized portion of the GDP and generate an unreasonable number of patents. This capital-ization has pretty far-reaching effects: the more high-tech, high-powered folks you have in a place, the more similarly gifted people will be attracted to moving there—and all these jobs actually generate more jobs. Moretti says that a high-tech job actually creates something like 10 service sector gigs.

Why Your Friends Shape Your Happiness, Creativity, and Career
"There is no one to disturb you and it is cool or cold and you come to your work and warm as you write. You read what you have written and, as you always stop when you know what is going to happen next, you go on from there. You write until you come to a place where you still have your juice and know what will happen next and you stop and try to live through until the next day when you hit it again. You have started at six in the morning, say, and may go on until noon or be through before that."
—Ernest Hemingway, who got up insanely early and knew the benefits of a standing desk. 
Productivity lessons from Hemingway

"There is no one to disturb you and it is cool or cold and you come to your work and warm as you write. You read what you have written and, as you always stop when you know what is going to happen next, you go on from there. You write until you come to a place where you still have your juice and know what will happen next and you stop and try to live through until the next day when you hit it again. You have started at six in the morning, say, and may go on until noon or be through before that."

Ernest Hemingway, who got up insanely early and knew the benefits of a standing desk. 

Productivity lessons from Hemingway

Elmore Leonard, the recently deceased author of 45 novels, including Get Shorty, Hombre, Swag,Raylan, and Glitz (he died at work on his 46th), was reluctant to write about his own writing. But back in 2001 the New York Times convinced him to make a list of his 10 writing rules:
1. Never use the words ”suddenly” or ”all hell broke loose.”Leonard writes that this rule doesn’t even require an explanation.
2. Use regional dialect, patois sparingly.“Once you start,” writes Leonard, “you won’t be able to stop.”
3. Avoid detailed descriptions of characters.Leonard cites a Hemingway short story in which the only physical description of a couple introduced as the ”American and the girl with him” is: ”She had taken off her hat and put it on the table.” Enough said.
More writing rules 

Elmore Leonard, the recently deceased author of 45 novels, including Get Shorty, Hombre, Swag,Raylan, and Glitz (he died at work on his 46th), was reluctant to write about his own writing. But back in 2001 the New York Times convinced him to make a list of his 10 writing rules:

1. Never use the words ”suddenly” or ”all hell broke loose.”
Leonard writes that this rule doesn’t even require an explanation.

2. Use regional dialect, patois sparingly.
“Once you start,” writes Leonard, “you won’t be able to stop.”

3. Avoid detailed descriptions of characters.
Leonard cites a Hemingway short story in which the only physical description of a couple introduced as the ”American and the girl with him” is: ”She had taken off her hat and put it on the table.” Enough said.

More writing rules 

I literally don’t understand the concept of boring. I know that it’s out there. I know some people complain of boredom. But I have no idea what’s on their mind when they experience it. Are they are desensitized? Are they are too bombarded? Are they incapable of connecting to life? Because—wow!—life is actually pretty good.

Gogol Bordello’s lead singer Eugene Hutz on why only boring people get bored. 

What a punk sensibility can teach you about embracing chaos