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This Obscene Card Game Can Help You Be More Creative 
"Since I believe in both working and playing as hard as I can, and Burning Man isn’t every single day, I have to figure out a way to be outré and loud and crazy as often as possible," BlogHer CEO, Lisa Stone says. "We play a lot of games in my family, and anyone who doesn’t own Cards Against Humanity should go right out and buy a deck."
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[Images courtesy of Cards Against Humanity]

This Obscene Card Game Can Help You Be More Creative

"Since I believe in both working and playing as hard as I can, and Burning Man isn’t every single day, I have to figure out a way to be outré and loud and crazy as often as possible," BlogHer CEO, Lisa Stone says. "We play a lot of games in my family, and anyone who doesn’t own Cards Against Humanity should go right out and buy a deck."

Read More>

[Images courtesy of Cards Against Humanity]

Some of these ad concepts are better than what you see coming out of major agencies—and they were all conceived by felons, a reminder that creativity is born from life experience. Read more>

Some of these ad concepts are better than what you see coming out of major agencies—and they were all conceived by felons, a reminder that creativity is born from life experience. Read more>

When Jim Brett took over as West Elm’s president in 2010, he noticed a big issue that he immediately wanted to fix: chocolate boxes.
Jim Brett was haunted by mud-colored squares. When he started as West Elm’s president in 2010, he couldn’t believe how a furniture store could have so many products designed with such little imagination. “I was like, ‘Oh, my God, what’s with the brown boxes?’” he says. “The whole brand was brown boxes made in China. There wasn’t a curve in the store!” From couches to beds to dressers, much of the line consisted of low-slung angular block shapes covered in lifeless chocolate finishes. Even the West Elm logo was trapped inside a pair of overlapping squares. “It was all machine-made, all very clean and simple, and all very soulless,” says Brett. “I wanted to bring personality and soul and handmade into the business.”
Read more>

When Jim Brett took over as West Elm’s president in 2010, he noticed a big issue that he immediately wanted to fix: chocolate boxes.

Jim Brett was haunted by mud-colored squares. When he started as West Elm’s president in 2010, he couldn’t believe how a furniture store could have so many products designed with such little imagination. “I was like, ‘Oh, my God, what’s with the brown boxes?’” he says. “The whole brand was brown boxes made in China. There wasn’t a curve in the store!” From couches to beds to dressers, much of the line consisted of low-slung angular block shapes covered in lifeless chocolate finishes. Even the West Elm logo was trapped inside a pair of overlapping squares. “It was all machine-made, all very clean and simple, and all very soulless,” says Brett. “I wanted to bring personality and soul and handmade into the business.”

Read more>

"In 5 years, a computer system could know what you like to eat better than you do. A machine that experiences flavor will determine the precise chemical structure of food and why people like it. Not only will it get you to eat healthier, but it will also surprise us with unusual pairings of foods that are designed to maximize our experience of taste and flavor. Digital taste buds will help you to eat smarter." - How Creative Can Computers Be?

"In 5 years, a computer system could know what you like to eat better than you do. A machine that experiences flavor will determine the precise chemical structure of food and why people like it. Not only will it get you to eat healthier, but it will also surprise us with unusual pairings of foods that are designed to maximize our experience of taste and flavor. Digital taste buds will help you to eat smarter." - How Creative Can Computers Be?

This 4,400 square-foot desk creates hiding holes for an escape within the office.

One creative agency decided to reinvent the idea of a “desk” entirely. Instead of installing a metal slide or set of pinball machines, the New York-based Barbarian Group built one giant “superdesk” out of plywood and a single pour of resin. The whole thing stands at 4,400 square feet, and undulates throughout the space, creating regular desk-like slabs, but also oddly-shaped nooks and crannies.

“We really wanted everyone sitting under a desk, but we also wanted to create spaces where people could escape to.”

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