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Less than 1% of women going to college plan to major in computer science, according to the American Association of University Women. Those are bleak numbers.
What will prompt more women to get into coding? The first step: paying teachers to recruit girls to take coding classes.
With $1 million in funding from Google’s Made With Code initiative, nonprofit DonorsChoose.org is rewarding teachers with money when they get four or more female students to complete a coding class online.
Read More>

Less than 1% of women going to college plan to major in computer science, according to the American Association of University Women. Those are bleak numbers.

What will prompt more women to get into coding? The first step: paying teachers to recruit girls to take coding classes.

With $1 million in funding from Google’s Made With Code initiative, nonprofit DonorsChoose.org is rewarding teachers with money when they get four or more female students to complete a coding class online.

Read More>

The release of a new programming language at Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference this week highlighted one of the most marketable skills in the digital world: the ability to code. How necessary is it, really? And is that even the right question?
Read More>

The release of a new programming language at Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference this week highlighted one of the most marketable skills in the digital world: the ability to code. How necessary is it, really? And is that even the right question?

Read More>

This Man Will Give 10% Of His Salary To Fund Another Minority Developer If His Indiegogo Campaign Succeeds
Crowdfunding has become a popular means to turn concepts into products, but one man is turning to Indiegogo in hopes of financing his tuition at a coding bootcamp. But there’s a twist to his campaign: If funded, Lex Alexander says he’ll pay it forward, pledging 10% of his salary for the next two years to finance a minority or female developer to attend a hack school of his or her choosing. “All I ask is they do the same for the next person, and so on,” Alexander told Fast Company.

This Man Will Give 10% Of His Salary To Fund Another Minority Developer If His Indiegogo Campaign Succeeds

Crowdfunding has become a popular means to turn concepts into products, but one man is turning to Indiegogo in hopes of financing his tuition at a coding bootcamp. But there’s a twist to his campaign: If funded, Lex Alexander says he’ll pay it forward, pledging 10% of his salary for the next two years to finance a minority or female developer to attend a hack school of his or her choosing. “All I ask is they do the same for the next person, and so on,” Alexander told Fast Company.

If you care at all about technology (and as a reader of this website, you probably do) odds are that back in February you were one of the roughly 12 million people who viewed the video “What Most Schools Don’t Teach,” featuring the likes of Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, and the Miami Heat’s Chris Bosh encouraging kids to learn to code. The launch of the video, directed by Lesley Chilcott (An Inconvenient TruthWaiting for Superman), also marked the launch of Code.org, a website with resources for students and teachers who are curious about coding and want to teach themselves. Both the video and the site were productions of Silicon Valley investor Hadi Partovi, a former Microsoft employee and advisor to Zuckerberg in Facebook’s early days.

Eight months later, Code.org has grown from a mere website to a national network of advocates and educators dedicated to bringing computer science to every school in the country.

At a press conference this afternoon, Partovi revealed a list of the organization’s principle backers, which includes Gates, Zuckerberg, and Reid Hoffman, as well as Microsoft, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google, and others. Code.org has also entered a long-term partnership with the National Science Foundation, through which they will share the results of curriculum evaluations and educational research and work together to develop two new courses for high school-level computer science scholars.

Most significant, however, may have been Partovi’s third announcement: the Hour of Code campaign, part of Computer Science Education Week, an annual celebration that Partovi hopes this year to turn into a national movement. Code.org and its partner in Computer Science Education Week, a group called Computing in the Core, will publish hour-long coding tutorials on a variety of platforms, from desktop to Xbox, and even an offline tutorial, and encourage student teachers to put aside their regular lessons for the day—be they in trigonometry or civics or French—and give their students an hour of code. The goal: teach 10 million people to code.

Dropbox and Skype have each pledged to provide $10 gift certificates to students who complete the tutorial, and Teach for America, Boys & Girls Club, the Girl Scouts, and the College Board have all committed to spread the word to their constituencies.

Computer Science Education Week begins December 8.

Fast Company has launched a brand new site, Co.Labs. We couldn’t be more excited about it—in fact, we’ve been celebrating all weekend in Austin!

(Source: fastcolabs.com)

Do you think you could help the FBI crack this code?

On June 30th, 1999, officers in St. Louis, Missouri, found the body  of Ricky McCormick, 41, in a field. He had been murdered. There were no  clues, with two exceptions: two notes written in code in McCormick’s  pants pockets.
The murder remains unsolved. Over a decade later,  the FBI’s Cryptanalysis and Racketeering Records Unit (CRRU) has  essentially thrown up its hands. “We are really good at what we do,” said CRRU chief Dan Olson in a solicitation on the FBI’s website, “but we could use some help with this one.”

Click through for more clues.

Do you think you could help the FBI crack this code?

On June 30th, 1999, officers in St. Louis, Missouri, found the body of Ricky McCormick, 41, in a field. He had been murdered. There were no clues, with two exceptions: two notes written in code in McCormick’s pants pockets.

The murder remains unsolved. Over a decade later, the FBI’s Cryptanalysis and Racketeering Records Unit (CRRU) has essentially thrown up its hands. “We are really good at what we do,” said CRRU chief Dan Olson in a solicitation on the FBI’s website, “but we could use some help with this one.”

Click through for more clues.