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Daily Fast Feed Roundup

Happy Hump Day! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 

  • TripAdvisor just bought GateGuru, an app that offers travelers airport info in real-time. 

Have a great day! —M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Chinese artist Ai WeiWei has created his first music video, for his single called “Dumbass.” The video recreates the environment of his 2011 prison stay right down to the wallpaper.
Weiwei sees “Dumbass” as a kind of therapy, and an activist message all by itself—it contains criticism of Chinese intellectuals who are trying to change China from within the system.
Watch. 

Chinese artist Ai WeiWei has created his first music video, for his single called “Dumbass.” The video recreates the environment of his 2011 prison stay right down to the wallpaper.

Weiwei sees “Dumbass” as a kind of therapy, and an activist message all by itself—it contains criticism of Chinese intellectuals who are trying to change China from within the system.

Watch

Nadav Kander’s series, Yangtze: The Long River has won some of photography’s most prestigious awards, and next month it will make its debut in New York at Flowers Gallery. Ironically, though only five years have passed since the images were shot, they depict landscapes that have since changed drastically. “They really do feel like pictures that can never be taken again,” the photographer says.

Nadav Kander’s series, Yangtze: The Long River has won some of photography’s most prestigious awards, and next month it will make its debut in New York at Flowers Gallery. Ironically, though only five years have passed since the images were shot, they depict landscapes that have since changed drastically. “They really do feel like pictures that can never be taken again,” the photographer says.

You look at companies like Motorola and Nokia—these type of guys who are big pushers of being socially responsible. Well, they are not really. Because what you’re doing is you’re just going to a factory that’s giving it to you for five cents less," he says. "But how do you think they got it to five cents less? It’s because they’re cutting corners.

The former VP of Flextronics—a major electronics supplier—talks about the difficulties of trying to be a responsible company while also delivering on the seductive promises of China’s economy.

(Source: fastcoexist.com)


"Beijing was such a different city," says Ma Jun, China’s preeminent environmental watchdog, remembering the capital as it was during his childhood. "There were so few cars, I could walk in the middle of the road. In the summer, the streetlamps attracted swirling bugs. I loved those bugs: crickets, praying mantis, all kinds of beetles." The 44-year-old pauses. "I also have a vivid memory of dazzling sunlight coming out of the sky. Today, the sky is different."

Ma Jun Keeps Your iPhone From Killing People

"Beijing was such a different city," says Ma Jun, China’s preeminent environmental watchdog, remembering the capital as it was during his childhood. "There were so few cars, I could walk in the middle of the road. In the summer, the streetlamps attracted swirling bugs. I loved those bugs: crickets, praying mantis, all kinds of beetles." The 44-year-old pauses. "I also have a vivid memory of dazzling sunlight coming out of the sky. Today, the sky is different."

Ma Jun Keeps Your iPhone From Killing People

NoGeMo: A Tamagotchi Clone To Teach China About Healthy Food

Want to grow your NoGeMo? You better not feed it genetically modified food. That’s the goal of a new game from Chinese Greenpeace designed to help its users navigate the murky world of healthy produce in China.

Read on ->

At the beginning of 2011, Fast Company set out to spend a year in China, documenting the transition, transformation and innovation in that country. Our reporters spent time with people from many sectors of Chinese life, and what our team emerged with was a picture of China that is far more complex than we expected, a portrait of a nation that is complicated and searching collectively for its future.
Fast Company’s 2011 China Project

At the beginning of 2011, Fast Company set out to spend a year in China, documenting the transition, transformation and innovation in that country. Our reporters spent time with people from many sectors of Chinese life, and what our team emerged with was a picture of China that is far more complex than we expected, a portrait of a nation that is complicated and searching collectively for its future.

Fast Company’s 2011 China Project

Fast Company asked several of the most creative ad agencies in the world to rebrand baby girls. Their mock campaigns recast girls as the No. 1 choice for consumers from China to the U.S.
Agency: AKQA Target Demo: AFFLUENT WOMEN IN CHINA The Ad Folks: This digital agency based in San Francisco has done campaigns for Heineken, Gap, Nike, and the Xbox 360. Their Campaign Strategy: To help rural Chinese see women as precious, ads will nudge urban professionals, whose cultural influence is vast. The character on the lips is the female version of the word ni (“you”). The ad aims to speak to those who know they have value and those who don’t yet see that.

Fast Company asked several of the most creative ad agencies in the world to rebrand baby girls. Their mock campaigns recast girls as the No. 1 choice for consumers from China to the U.S.

Agency: AKQA Target Demo: AFFLUENT WOMEN IN CHINA The Ad Folks: This digital agency based in San Francisco has done campaigns for Heineken, Gap, Nike, and the Xbox 360. Their Campaign Strategy: To help rural Chinese see women as precious, ads will nudge urban professionals, whose cultural influence is vast. The character on the lips is the female version of the word ni (“you”). The ad aims to speak to those who know they have value and those who don’t yet see that.

A rare glimpse at Lenovo, China’s first global brand, from Beijing to the rural hinterlands. Lenovo is ubiquitous in its homeland, with more than 15,000 stores in cities and even the smallest villages. That’s almost as many locations as Starbucks has worldwide, nearly twice as many locations as Wal-Mart, and roughly 14,700 more stores than Apple has.

A rare glimpse at Lenovo, China’s first global brand, from Beijing to the rural hinterlands. Lenovo is ubiquitous in its homeland, with more than 15,000 stores in cities and even the smallest villages. That’s almost as many locations as Starbucks has worldwide, nearly twice as many locations as Wal-Mart, and roughly 14,700 more stores than Apple has.