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Internet recommendations from Sarah Kessler, Fast Company's Associate Editor:
1. The “Can Men Wear Shorts?” debateThe Pacific Standard was the only publication I saw bring an academic into this debate, which is exactly what it needed.
2. Kristin Wiig as Michael Jordan with Jimmy Fallon. Perfect
3. The Pixar Theory John Lasseter, Disney’s chief creative officer, recently told mewhile I was reporting an upcoming story that mixing characters from different Pixar movies has always been taboo. And after reading Jon Negroni’s “Pixar Theory,” I finally understand why: Putting Pixar characters together would make it far too obvious that all the studio’s movies are actually part of the same story—beginning with the witch in Brave experimenting with giving animals the ability to speak. I can’t believe we didn’t see this before.
Here, a few more staff recommendations for you! 

[Image: Flickr user JD Hancock]

Internet recommendations from Sarah Kessler, Fast Company's Associate Editor:

1. The “Can Men Wear Shorts?” debate
The Pacific Standard was the only publication I saw bring an academic into this debate, which is exactly what it needed.

2. Kristin Wiig as Michael Jordan with Jimmy Fallon. Perfect

3. The Pixar Theory 
John Lasseter, Disney’s chief creative officer, recently told me
while I was reporting an upcoming story that mixing characters from different Pixar movies has always been taboo. And after reading Jon Negroni’s “Pixar Theory,” I finally understand why: Putting Pixar characters together would make it far too obvious that all the studio’s movies are actually part of the same story—beginning with the witch in Brave experimenting with giving animals the ability to speak. I can’t believe we didn’t see this before.

Here, a few more staff recommendations for you! 

[Image: Flickr user JD Hancock]

"I think it validates the model in a lot of ways. I think it also blurs the line forever about what is television. Television is what’s on the screen, no matter what size the screen or how the content got to the screen. Television is television is television." 

—Netflix’s chief content officer Ted Sarandos talks about the Emmy nominations for Netflix shows: House of Cards, Arrested Development, and Hemlock Grove.

Do Netflix’s Emmy nominations blur the line forever about what TV is?

Innovation expert Kaihan Krippendorff uses hip-hop star Drake’s path to achieving his goal of $25 million by the age of 25 to demonstrate his 30-minute strategy for reaching your goals.
1. After you are goneThis is an outcome you will not achieve in your lifetime but it is the reason you get up and push ahead every day.Drake Example: To make genre-cracking music that connects emotionally with his audience.
2. The endThis is a picture (or vision) of what you will achieve or what you will become in the long-term, usually 3 to 10 years from now. Define 1 to 3 metrics, and their values, that will tell you that you have achieved your long-term vision. Drake Example: To be known by Dec. 31, 2016, as one of the greatest musical artists in the world; to be indefinable, with music that crosses genres; to have multiple houses and a private jet.
3. The next chapter (12-18 months)What must you achieve in the next 12 to 18 months to know you are on the path and by what metrics will you judge that the plot is unfolding as you desire?Drake Example: To have released by Dec. 31, 2014, one of the biggest albums of the year.
4. Plot actions (12-18 months)What 3 to 5 actions (or strategic priorities) will you focus on continuously for the next 12 to 18 months to reach this chapter’s conclusion?Drake Example: Release best album yet; continue improving music and performance; launch successful tour.
5. The first scene (the next 3 months)What 1 to 5 key metrics will you focus on in the next three months (and who is responsible)?Drake Example: 15 songs recorded that he thinks are awesome; 120 total hours practiced.



[Drake Image: AP Images]

Innovation expert Kaihan Krippendorff uses hip-hop star Drake’s path to achieving his goal of $25 million by the age of 25 to demonstrate his 30-minute strategy for reaching your goals.

1. After you are gone
This is an outcome you will not achieve in your lifetime but it is the reason you get up and push ahead every day.
Drake Example: To make genre-cracking music that connects emotionally with his audience.

2. The end
This is a picture (or vision) of what you will achieve or what you will become in the long-term, usually 3 to 10 years from now. Define 1 to 3 metrics, and their values, that will tell you that you have achieved your long-term vision. 
Drake Example: To be known by Dec. 31, 2016, as one of the greatest musical artists in the world; to be indefinable, with music that crosses genres; to have multiple houses and a private jet.

3. The next chapter (12-18 months)
What must you achieve in the next 12 to 18 months to know you are on the path and by what metrics will you judge that the plot is unfolding as you desire?
Drake Example: To have released by Dec. 31, 2014, one of the biggest albums of the year.

4. Plot actions (12-18 months)
What 3 to 5 actions (or strategic priorities) will you focus on continuously for the next 12 to 18 months to reach this chapter’s conclusion?
Drake Example: Release best album yet; continue improving music and performance; launch successful tour.

5. The first scene (the next 3 months)
What 1 to 5 key metrics will you focus on in the next three months (and who is responsible)?
Drake Example: 15 songs recorded that he thinks are awesome; 120 total hours practiced.

[Drake Image: AP Images]


 ”I see the future but I live for the moment, make sense don’t it. Now make dollars, I mean billions. I’m a genius, I mean brilliant.”

—Pitbull, who is worth a mere $9.5 million.
This Businessweek infographic lays out the claimed vs. actual networth of rappers because apparently, when rappers rap about how much money they have, sometimes it’s slightly exaggerated. 
 

 ”I see the future but I live for the moment, make sense don’t it. Now make dollars, I mean billions. I’m a genius, I mean brilliant.

—Pitbull, who is worth a mere $9.5 million.

This Businessweek infographic lays out the claimed vs. actual networth of rappers because apparently, when rappers rap about how much money they have, sometimes it’s slightly exaggerated. 

 

Apple’s WWDC event kicked off yesterday, with Apple announcing a new OS X, a MacBook Air with better battery life, a redesigned iOS 7, among other things. Here are some WWDC resources to help you keep up: 

Other resources:

We’ll be updating this list as new, great resources come to our attention. Feel free to flag great Apple or WWDC reads for us in the comments. Have you found any?