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Photography’s renaissance rests on a few unbeatable advantages. Compared to other kinds of content—songs and movies—photos are, technically and legally, much easier to share and mash up. If you come up with a great, unexpected new site centered on TV shows, you need to get huge servers and pay for expensive bandwidth and licensing deals. If you’ve got a fantastic new take on photos, often all you need is an app. That app lives on a smartphone, which is the world’s most popular point-and-shoot camera. For the first time, cameras are connected to the Internet, they know who your friends are, they know where you are, and they can be constantly updated with new powers. The camera is powerful (Apple’s iPhone 4S is 8 megapixels) and intelligent, and the pictures keep getting more interesting.

Why photography is every tech product’s most valuable feature.

Photography’s renaissance rests on a few unbeatable advantages. Compared to other kinds of content—songs and movies—photos are, technically and legally, much easier to share and mash up. If you come up with a great, unexpected new site centered on TV shows, you need to get huge servers and pay for expensive bandwidth and licensing deals. If you’ve got a fantastic new take on photos, often all you need is an app. That app lives on a smartphone, which is the world’s most popular point-and-shoot camera. For the first time, cameras are connected to the Internet, they know who your friends are, they know where you are, and they can be constantly updated with new powers. The camera is powerful (Apple’s iPhone 4S is 8 megapixels) and intelligent, and the pictures keep getting more interesting.

Why photography is every tech product’s most valuable feature.

This is what happens when a digital camera makes love to your cellphone.

As digital cameras have outgrown their bulky origins and continued to miniaturize, some photographers and cinematographers  joke that soon the “camera” itself will disappear, leaving just a lens  with a chip and a screen on the back of it.
That’s basically what the designer/photography nuts at Artefact have created with their WVIL concept camera,  which looks like a DSLR lens with an iPhone stuck to it. But Artefact  considers even that radical design as a starting point, not a  destination — after all, if your camera is just a lens with a chip in  the back, why not make the viewfinder detachable from the lens and really get crazy?

The video demo is siiiiiiick! You’re going to want to click through for this one.

This is what happens when a digital camera makes love to your cellphone.

As digital cameras have outgrown their bulky origins and continued to miniaturize, some photographers and cinematographers joke that soon the “camera” itself will disappear, leaving just a lens with a chip and a screen on the back of it.

That’s basically what the designer/photography nuts at Artefact have created with their WVIL concept camera, which looks like a DSLR lens with an iPhone stuck to it. But Artefact considers even that radical design as a starting point, not a destination — after all, if your camera is just a lens with a chip in the back, why not make the viewfinder detachable from the lens and really get crazy?

The video demo is siiiiiiick! You’re going to want to click through for this one.