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The state of California is suing San Francisco over the waterfront height limit that Bay Area residents voted into law back in June, arguing that the ballot measure usurps state power.
If California finds that measure offensive, wait ‘til San Francisco gets a crack at a ballot proposal to break up the whole damned state. A proposal to divide California into six new states could appear on the November 2016 ballot, courtesy of venture capitalist and self-proclaimed “Riskmaster” Timothy Draper.
According to Six Californias, the proposal has already garnered 1.3 million signatures, the first batch of which Draper submitted to election officials yesterday. If Draper has collected as many signatures as he says he has—and for the millions he’s spent on the effort, it had better be true—then this Six Flags Over California scheme will go before voters the year after next.
Six Californias, One Super City-State - CityLab

It’s official. We’ve found a crazier idea to come out of the Bay Area than this one.

shortformblog:

newsweek:

The state of California is suing San Francisco over the waterfront height limit that Bay Area residents voted into law back in June, arguing that the ballot measure usurps state power.

If California finds that measure offensive, wait ‘til San Francisco gets a crack at a ballot proposal to break up the whole damned state. A proposal to divide California into six new states could appear on the November 2016 ballot, courtesy of venture capitalist and self-proclaimed “Riskmaster” Timothy Draper.

According to Six Californias, the proposal has already garnered 1.3 million signatures, the first batch of which Draper submitted to election officials yesterday. If Draper has collected as many signatures as he says he has—and for the millions he’s spent on the effort, it had better be true—then this Six Flags Over California scheme will go before voters the year after next.

Six Californias, One Super City-State - CityLab

It’s official. We’ve found a crazier idea to come out of the Bay Area than this one.

Cecilia Abadie, a Google Glass Explorer and resident of California, Land of the Technologically Free, is sparking a big debate on her Google Plus page right now after she scanned a photo of a ticket she got last night for wearing Google Glass while driving.
According to the ticket, the precise charge against Abadie is “Driving with monitor visible to driver (Google Glass).” Abadie was first pulled over for speeding, which she received a citation for and claims was justified. But she adds, “The cop was being really nasty and asking me again and again why I was wearing Google Glass in the car.”
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Cecilia Abadie, a Google Glass Explorer and resident of California, Land of the Technologically Free, is sparking a big debate on her Google Plus page right now after she scanned a photo of a ticket she got last night for wearing Google Glass while driving.

According to the ticket, the precise charge against Abadie is “Driving with monitor visible to driver (Google Glass).” Abadie was first pulled over for speeding, which she received a citation for and claims was justified. But she adds, “The cop was being really nasty and asking me again and again why I was wearing Google Glass in the car.”

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In California, Pacific Gas & Electric and AIA San Francisco sponsor an annual $25,000 competition, Architecture at Zero, that asks entrants to design grid-connected structures that are zero net site energy. That means, according to the challenge’s definition, that the structures need to produce “at least as much energy as it uses over a year when accounted for at the site level (as defined by the boundaries of the project, whether one or multiple buildings).” It’s impossible to predict exactly how much energy a building will consume before it’s built, so entrants also have to demonstrate that their projects can meet the goal over time—most likely by reducing building energy loads 50% below current standard building loads in California.
 This year, Architecture at Zero challenged to design an administration building or student housing for the University of California, Merced on land that currently contains parking lots, a trailer, and grazing land. The top honor award went to Silver Streak, a project from Bay Area firm Loisos + Ubbelohde.

In California, Pacific Gas & Electric and AIA San Francisco sponsor an annual $25,000 competition, Architecture at Zero, that asks entrants to design grid-connected structures that are zero net site energy. That means, according to the challenge’s definition, that the structures need to produce “at least as much energy as it uses over a year when accounted for at the site level (as defined by the boundaries of the project, whether one or multiple buildings).” It’s impossible to predict exactly how much energy a building will consume before it’s built, so entrants also have to demonstrate that their projects can meet the goal over time—most likely by reducing building energy loads 50% below current standard building loads in California.


This year, Architecture at Zero challenged to design an administration building or student housing for the University of California, Merced on land that currently contains parking lots, a trailer, and grazing land. The top honor award went to Silver Streak, a project from Bay Area firm Loisos + Ubbelohde.