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You may not have heard of C200, but you have definitely heard of its members.
"We want to do something to make sure that the next generation of women has a leg to stand on and a start. We have to continue to fight the fight and keep moving our own careers so they have a light ahead of them to keep coming."
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You may not have heard of C200, but you have definitely heard of its members.

"We want to do something to make sure that the next generation of women has a leg to stand on and a start. We have to continue to fight the fight and keep moving our own careers so they have a light ahead of them to keep coming."

Read More>

You don’t have to be stuck at that desk all summer. Here’s how Bianca Forzano left her office and ended up with a thriving company that she operates from the beach.

As Forzano became more involved in the kite surfing scene in Cabarete through a local nonprofit called Kite Boarding for Girls, she realized that there was not a good sports bikini on the market. In short, when trying to kite surf in a regular bikini, there was a fair chance it would fall off.
This was the inspiration for Bianca Bikinis, a range of hand-made sports bikinis, which sell for about $100. … Forzano’s story is a valuable reminder that it is possible to escape from a job that is not making you happy—even if the exact escape plan is not entirely figured out. Here are some of the things Forzano did to make sure her escape was a success:

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You don’t have to be stuck at that desk all summer. Here’s how Bianca Forzano left her office and ended up with a thriving company that she operates from the beach.

As Forzano became more involved in the kite surfing scene in Cabarete through a local nonprofit called Kite Boarding for Girls, she realized that there was not a good sports bikini on the market. In short, when trying to kite surf in a regular bikini, there was a fair chance it would fall off.

This was the inspiration for Bianca Bikinis, a range of hand-made sports bikinis, which sell for about $100. … Forzano’s story is a valuable reminder that it is possible to escape from a job that is not making you happy—even if the exact escape plan is not entirely figured out. Here are some of the things Forzano did to make sure her escape was a success:

Read More>

Anyone who gets married in a $100,000 sponsored wedding with 7,500 spectators in a stadium doesn’t think small.
Meet big thinker Dave Kerpen, a salesman, entrepreneur extraordinaire, and New York Times best-selling author, who at age 37 is founder and CEO of Likeable Local, a social media company for small businesses, and co-founder of Likeable Media, a word of mouth and social media company.
Eight years ago Kerpen wanted a big wedding, and lacking the money to pay for it proved no obstacle. Kerpen and his wife, Carrie, persuaded 1800Flowers.com, Entenmann’s, and other companies to fork over much of the cost in return for sponsorship.
The wedding venture’s success led the Kerpens to start an event company, which quickly morphed into Likeable Media, and 1800Flowers.com and Entenmann’s followed right along as clients.
Like other successful leaders, Kerpen has extra sensitive antennae that helped him recognize early on the impact of social media. Unlike the dime-a-dozen social media companies, Likeable Media and Likeable Local differentiate themselves with the concept of likeability.
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To say his concept has resonated with people is like saying Facebook has a lot of users. To date more than 2.6 people have viewed his LinkedIn article outlining his likable leadership principles, making it one of the most read articles on LinkedIn.
His principles, as Kerpen himself admits, are “very obvious and not rocket science, but the issue is that people don’t think about them or integrate them into their lives as much as they should.” Some of his 11 principles include listening, storytelling, authenticity, and gratefulness.
“People are hungry to become better leaders and eager for greater self-awareness and self-improvement,” Kerpen explains.
Meanwhile, as someone who practices what he preaches, Kerpen has learned a lot along the way in terms of being an effective—or likable—leader.
Here are four of his central leadership tips.

Anyone who gets married in a $100,000 sponsored wedding with 7,500 spectators in a stadium doesn’t think small.

Meet big thinker Dave Kerpen, a salesman, entrepreneur extraordinaire, and New York Times best-selling author, who at age 37 is founder and CEO of Likeable Local, a social media company for small businesses, and co-founder of Likeable Media, a word of mouth and social media company.

Eight years ago Kerpen wanted a big wedding, and lacking the money to pay for it proved no obstacle. Kerpen and his wife, Carrie, persuaded 1800Flowers.com, Entenmann’s, and other companies to fork over much of the cost in return for sponsorship.

The wedding venture’s success led the Kerpens to start an event company, which quickly morphed into Likeable Media, and 1800Flowers.com and Entenmann’s followed right along as clients.

Like other successful leaders, Kerpen has extra sensitive antennae that helped him recognize early on the impact of social media. Unlike the dime-a-dozen social media companies, Likeable Media and Likeable Local differentiate themselves with the concept of likeability.

Even when young professionals post out-of-office messages, they’re still connected. Here’s why employers should give the option to check in.
No matter where you take your summer holiday, if you’re a millennial, then you will likely be packing your inbox.
According to a recent study by HR consulting firm Randstad, 52% of millennial employees reported feeling compelled to respond to emails outside of working hours. Despite their ability to connect with the office while away, 40% of generation Y employees reported feeling guilty about using all of their vacation time, compared to only 18% of baby boomers.
Jim Link, managing director of HR at Randstad, attributes some of this generational difference to the fact that millennial employees are in earlier stages of their careers and are apt to feel more anxious about appearing responsive. They are more hesitant to take time off for fear of missing out on career opportunities, he adds.

Baby boomer employees who have more seniority may feel a greater sense of security, Link explains. Therefore, they value freedom when it comes to taking vacation time and creating a clear separation between work and home life.
“If you’re young, you’re trying to show your value in an organization,” he says. “The bleeding between work and life is also more pronounced among millennials. They’re also the group who are most comfortable being connected while they’re away.”
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Even when young professionals post out-of-office messages, they’re still connected. Here’s why employers should give the option to check in.

No matter where you take your summer holiday, if you’re a millennial, then you will likely be packing your inbox.

According to a recent study by HR consulting firm Randstad, 52% of millennial employees reported feeling compelled to respond to emails outside of working hours. Despite their ability to connect with the office while away, 40% of generation Y employees reported feeling guilty about using all of their vacation time, compared to only 18% of baby boomers.

Jim Link, managing director of HR at Randstad, attributes some of this generational difference to the fact that millennial employees are in earlier stages of their careers and are apt to feel more anxious about appearing responsive. They are more hesitant to take time off for fear of missing out on career opportunities, he adds.

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Baby boomer employees who have more seniority may feel a greater sense of security, Link explains. Therefore, they value freedom when it comes to taking vacation time and creating a clear separation between work and home life.

“If you’re young, you’re trying to show your value in an organization,” he says. “The bleeding between work and life is also more pronounced among millennials. They’re also the group who are most comfortable being connected while they’re away.”

Read More>

The July Fourth weekend signals summer is in full swing. Will you unplug during the break, or will you stay tethered to your smartphone?
Not everyone can take a tropical vacation where cell-phone reception is spotty and you are truly disconnected from the outside world, but you can choose to spend time off the grid, wherever you are.
Whether you want to unplug for a few hours or an entire weekend, here are three persuasive reasons to leave your phone at home and take a digital detox.
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The July Fourth weekend signals summer is in full swing. Will you unplug during the break, or will you stay tethered to your smartphone?

Not everyone can take a tropical vacation where cell-phone reception is spotty and you are truly disconnected from the outside world, but you can choose to spend time off the grid, wherever you are.

Whether you want to unplug for a few hours or an entire weekend, here are three persuasive reasons to leave your phone at home and take a digital detox.

Read More>

American soldiers can’t drink when they’re fighting overseas, but returning vets can work wonders in the brewery.
Among the thousands of beers that will be drank near Fort Bragg this Fourth, there will be at least one that got its start in the war zone of Iraq. Working as medics in a Baghdad hospital, becoming numb to the wounds of war that they treated around the clock, Gerald Montero and two other medics spent their downtime talking about all the beer they would drink and make upon their return. When Eric Whealton, Tito Valenzuela, and Montero all finished their tours and arrived at Fort Bragg, they found a community perfect for launching their inaugural brew, Dirtbag Ales.

A “dirtbag” is defined by Urban Dictionary as a person who is a committed to an extreme lifestyle to the point of abandoning societal norms. There is some of that in this trio of veteran brewers, and in many of the military veteran brewers across the country. 
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American soldiers can’t drink when they’re fighting overseas, but returning vets can work wonders in the brewery.

Among the thousands of beers that will be drank near Fort Bragg this Fourth, there will be at least one that got its start in the war zone of Iraq. Working as medics in a Baghdad hospital, becoming numb to the wounds of war that they treated around the clock, Gerald Montero and two other medics spent their downtime talking about all the beer they would drink and make upon their return. When Eric WhealtonTito Valenzuela, and Montero all finished their tours and arrived at Fort Bragg, they found a community perfect for launching their inaugural brew, Dirtbag Ales.

image

A “dirtbag” is defined by Urban Dictionary as a person who is a committed to an extreme lifestyle to the point of abandoning societal norms. There is some of that in this trio of veteran brewers, and in many of the military veteran brewers across the country. 

Read More>

This Company’s Business Plan Includes Trespassing

Wanderlust Projects is an event design company that creates and curates original events, but there’s a twist: Attending one of their events could get you arrested.

"Our lives are full of boundaries," says Austin. "Anytime you cross those, the transgression of doing something you’re not supposed to be doing opens up something inside you."

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