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Nike sells a commodity, they sell shoes. And yet when you think of Nike you feel something different than a shoe company. In their ads, as you know, they don’t ever talk about the product, they don’t ever talk about their air soles, how they’re better than Reebok’s air soles. What’s Nike do in their advertising? They honor great athletes and they honor great athletics. That’s who they are. That is what they are about.

Steve Jobs, during a town hall meeting with employees before unveiling the “Think Different” campaign in 1997. 

(Source: parislemon)

Nike’s redesigned NFL uniform that everyone will be talking about tonight

  1. The helmet’s unique design fades from matte black in front to shiny gold in the rear.
  2. Nike’s Jags jersey is made out of high-tech stretch material that hugs the torso for a sleek look but still offers the necessary range of motion.
  3. An armed-forces-style badge is a nod to Jacksonville’s sizable military community.
  4. The belt adds hidden padding, which could help players avoid hip pointers, a common injury.
  5. When a player interlaces his hands just the right way, the gloves create a single image, the team logo.

More

7 Questions Every Head Of Marketing Better Be Able To Answer

CEO Francine Hardaway: 
"Brands are promises that get delivered every day. What did you promise today?"

CMOs have it tough. Not only do they have to account for every single dollar invested in marketing but they have to be part engineer, part marketer, and part financial guru.
Although most industries have been disintermediated by technology, the marketing industry worked backwards. More and more intermediaries now stand between the brand the publisher. It used to be only an agency. Now it’s many agencies and a plethora of tech vendors.
To complicate matters more, the marketing mix is expanding daily and now includes more buzzwords and acronyms so that you don’t pay any attention to the people behind the curtain. The savvy CMO is going to have to learn what questions to ask. Working with Proximic and its special way of helping brands deal with their own data to plan media has taught me to ask the right questions. The answers will be different for each of you.
Does this algorithm work for me?
Do I need RTB (real-time bidding) or RTM (real-time marketing)?
What’s more important, targeting the right person or delivering the right message? And do I need a cookie to know?
Do I know that where I’m appearing is brand safe?
What’s premium now?
Where does digital fit in my overall media mix?
What do I do with “Social-Mobile-Local”?
Remember: All advertising starts with a problem (e.g., one of your brands needs to gain share versus a competitor or need to protect share from a competitor). The only ROI that really matters is Did you “move the needle”? Did you move product or move minds? To do either, that message has to break through the clutter. That’s all. No other metric matters.
Read the full story here.
 
[Image: Flickr user Tony L. Wong]

7 Questions Every Head Of Marketing Better Be Able To Answer

CEO Francine Hardaway:

"Brands are promises that get delivered every day. What did you promise today?"

CMOs have it tough. Not only do they have to account for every single dollar invested in marketing but they have to be part engineer, part marketer, and part financial guru.

Although most industries have been disintermediated by technology, the marketing industry worked backwards. More and more intermediaries now stand between the brand the publisher. It used to be only an agency. Now it’s many agencies and a plethora of tech vendors.

To complicate matters more, the marketing mix is expanding daily and now includes more buzzwords and acronyms so that you don’t pay any attention to the people behind the curtain. The savvy CMO is going to have to learn what questions to ask. Working with Proximic and its special way of helping brands deal with their own data to plan media has taught me to ask the right questions. The answers will be different for each of you.

Does this algorithm work for me?

Do I need RTB (real-time bidding) or RTM (real-time marketing)?

What’s more important, targeting the right person or delivering the right message? And do I need a cookie to know?

Do I know that where I’m appearing is brand safe?

What’s premium now?

Where does digital fit in my overall media mix?

What do I do with “Social-Mobile-Local”?

Remember: All advertising starts with a problem (e.g., one of your brands needs to gain share versus a competitor or need to protect share from a competitor). The only ROI that really matters is Did you “move the needle”? Did you move product or move minds? To do either, that message has to break through the clutter. That’s all. No other metric matters.

Read the full story here.

 

[Image: Flickr user Tony L. Wong]

Your Personal Brand Is More Than Your Follower Count

Your brand isn’t about numbers, it’s about how people experience you in real life.

We’ve been discussing personal brands at Fast Company for a while now—like since 1997—but most of the time when we discuss the Brand Called You, we fittingly focus on Twitter tai chi and LinkedIn leverage. While these mediums are essential, we do live at least some of our lives offline—and your personal brand is present there, though you don’t get automated emails about it.
What we need, then, is a more holistic perspective. Writing for Forbes, Glenn Llopis supplies us with one:

"A personal brand is the total experience of someone having a relationship with who you are."

So live mindfully—and authentically.

Branding isn’t acting the part—performing all day will drain you—but rather the consequence of living with authenticity. Like a wise woman once said, “brand is an exhaust fume from you running the engine of your life.”


Read the rest here.
[Image: Flickr user Kurt Haubrich]

Your Personal Brand Is More Than Your Follower Count

Your brand isn’t about numbers, it’s about how people experience you in real life.

We’ve been discussing personal brands at Fast Company for a while now—like since 1997—but most of the time when we discuss the Brand Called You, we fittingly focus on Twitter tai chi and LinkedIn leverage. While these mediums are essential, we do live at least some of our lives offline—and your personal brand is present there, though you don’t get automated emails about it.

What we need, then, is a more holistic perspective. Writing for Forbes, Glenn Llopis supplies us with one:

"A personal brand is the total experience of someone having a relationship with who you are."

So live mindfully—and authentically.

Branding isn’t acting the part—performing all day will drain you—but rather the consequence of living with authenticity. Like a wise woman once said, “brand is an exhaust fume from you running the engine of your life.”

Read the rest here.

[Image: Flickr user Kurt Haubrich]

inspirezme:

This fascinating project, brought to us by Ewan Yap, explores how “less is more” within big consumer brands. Ewan created a series of experimental packaging design based on the principle of ‘Big Brand Theory‘. The main focus is to have each brand’s identity meticulously and uniquely cropped out of the packaging as much as possible, yet maintaining it’s integrity and comprehension and, at the same time, enhancing the aesthetic value. 

(Full post can be viewed here)

(via fastcodesign)

Which Brand is Overdue for an Overhaul? Vote, and We’ll Redesign It!

Which major brand’s identity is most in need of a redesign? Leave a comment here or post your suggestion to Twitter with the hashtag #RDchallenge.
Post your suggestions by February 11 and we’ll choose one that  Barrack will tackle in a redesign challenge. And we’ll also ask the  community (if you so choose, we’re not asking for spec work) to  contribute their ideas for how this brand might take a step in the right  direction.

Which Brand is Overdue for an Overhaul? Vote, and We’ll Redesign It!

Which major brand’s identity is most in need of a redesign? Leave a comment here or post your suggestion to Twitter with the hashtag #RDchallenge.

Post your suggestions by February 11 and we’ll choose one that Barrack will tackle in a redesign challenge. And we’ll also ask the community (if you so choose, we’re not asking for spec work) to contribute their ideas for how this brand might take a step in the right direction.