FastCompany Magazine

The official Tumblr of Fast Company.

This insanely slippery non-stick coating gets every last bit out of jars. Even glue jars. Watch

LiquiGlide is a super slippery coating that can be applied to all types of surfaces. WhenCo.Exist first broke the news about the invention, Dave Smith, the PhD candidate behind the novel substance, was focused on using LiquiGlide to make ketchup flow from jars like water—so we no longer had to tussle with that bottle of Heinz like a Shake Weight. (His aim was noble: Smith estimated the solution could save more than a million tons of annual food waste in the sauce industry alone.)

Since then, Smith has dropped out of MIT, incorporated LiquiGlide, and built up a team of nearly 20 mechanical engineers and nano-technologists. His company is now negotiating deals with the largest consumer packaged goods companies to bring LiquiGlide to everything from toothpaste and syrup to beer. He’s also exploring how the technology could be applied to a new range of industries, including medical, manufacturing, and even transportation products.

Check out the new videos

Makey Makey is a little circuit board that comes with a set of alligator clips. You can attach them to anything even mildly conductive (a body part, a glass of water, alphabet noodles, paper clips, Play Dough, or fruit for example) and use that thing to control your computer as though you were hitting the keyboard or moving the mouse.

Turn a bunch of bananas into a piano. Turn your friends into a synthesizer. Turn a trampoline into a slideshow controller. Turn your hand into a game glove. The possibilities are endless. 

A Street View-Style Tour Of National Parks Hiking Trails, Courtesy Of Nature Valley

To create Trail View, granola bar makers Nature Valley and McCann  Erickson sent a rag tag team of creatives and developers on a 45-day  hike to get couch potatoes interested in the real thing and raise  awareness of the national parks’ plight.
“This initiative lets [Nature Valley] stand for something,” says Leslie  Sims, executive creative director at McCann. “They aren’t just pushing  granola bars on hikers.”

A Street View-Style Tour Of National Parks Hiking Trails, Courtesy Of Nature Valley

To create Trail View, granola bar makers Nature Valley and McCann Erickson sent a rag tag team of creatives and developers on a 45-day hike to get couch potatoes interested in the real thing and raise awareness of the national parks’ plight.

“This initiative lets [Nature Valley] stand for something,” says Leslie Sims, executive creative director at McCann. “They aren’t just pushing granola bars on hikers.”

And now for today’s awesome science update: Arthur Olson’s Molecular Graphics Lab uses 3-D printers to spit out physical models of drugs and enzymes, and attaches augmented-reality tags to them so that computer vision can help researchers find the optimal fit. Think of it like playing with a Rubik’s cube, except the solution may help cure HIV.

Read More: How 3-D Printing & Augmented Reality Can Help Design Better Drugs