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This Fake Fast-Food Restaurant Is Actually Serving Money To Homeless People
Finnish artist Jani Leinonen has set up a Hunger King installation in Budapest that draws attention to Hungary’s conflicting policies toward the rich and the poor. Visitors choose between getting in “rich” or “poor” lines, with signage on either side revealing stats about inequality in taxes and education opportunities, fines for vagrancy, and other points. The first 50 people in the “poor” line each day are greeted with a clamshell burger box holding the equivalent of about $15, the daily minimum wage in Budapest. Visitors to the “rich” line get a fake burger and fake fries, and an appeal toward activism.
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This Fake Fast-Food Restaurant Is Actually Serving Money To Homeless People

Finnish artist Jani Leinonen has set up a Hunger King installation in Budapest that draws attention to Hungary’s conflicting policies toward the rich and the poor. Visitors choose between getting in “rich” or “poor” lines, with signage on either side revealing stats about inequality in taxes and education opportunities, fines for vagrancy, and other points. The first 50 people in the “poor” line each day are greeted with a clamshell burger box holding the equivalent of about $15, the daily minimum wage in Budapest. Visitors to the “rich” line get a fake burger and fake fries, and an appeal toward activism.

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In her series “Sound Form Wave,” Ukrainian designer Anna Marinenko draws a fresh comparison between visualized sound waves and jaggedly oscillating patterns in our natural environments. Mountain ranges, cityscapes, far-off tree lines, jet streams, and speedboat wakes are juxtaposed with graphics that reconsider their shapes as sound frequencies. The effect is at first beautiful—because the images blend so well. And then, as your eye adjusts, the effect is slightly jarring.
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In her series “Sound Form Wave,” Ukrainian designer Anna Marinenko draws a fresh comparison between visualized sound waves and jaggedly oscillating patterns in our natural environments. Mountain ranges, cityscapes, far-off tree lines, jet streams, and speedboat wakes are juxtaposed with graphics that reconsider their shapes as sound frequencies. The effect is at first beautiful—because the images blend so well. And then, as your eye adjusts, the effect is slightly jarring.

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What Do 769 Soccer Balls, Ocean Pollution, And Space Have In Common?
Just in time for the World Cup, the UK-based artist has transformed this waste into an eye-catching photo series, called Penalty, which aims to raise awareness about marine plastic pollution in the world’s oceans. Arranged against black, the colorful, sea-gnarled balls resemble galaxies of waste. Viewed abstractly, the images are simply beautiful. But they take on a more sinister aspect when you realize they represent just a tiny fraction of the pollution clogging our oceans.
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What Do 769 Soccer Balls, Ocean Pollution, And Space Have In Common?

Just in time for the World Cup, the UK-based artist has transformed this waste into an eye-catching photo series, called Penalty, which aims to raise awareness about marine plastic pollution in the world’s oceans. Arranged against black, the colorful, sea-gnarled balls resemble galaxies of waste. Viewed abstractly, the images are simply beautiful. But they take on a more sinister aspect when you realize they represent just a tiny fraction of the pollution clogging our oceans.

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Harvard Professor To Send The World’s First “Scent Message” Across The Pond
On Tuesday morning, at Manhattan’s American Museum of Natural History, Harvard Professor and CEO of Vapor Communications, David Edwards, will hit the ‘send’ button on his iPhone, and an email photograph tagged with the quintessential smell of New York — Pizza? The halal food trucks on 6th Avenue? The stench of horse piss on Central Park South? — will be delivered to a colleague in Paris, completing the first ever TransAtlantic transmission of a scent message.
The message, called an oNote, will be composed via an iPhone application called oSnap, soon to be available for free download in the Apple App store.
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Harvard Professor To Send The World’s First “Scent Message” Across The Pond

On Tuesday morning, at Manhattan’s American Museum of Natural History, Harvard Professor and CEO of Vapor Communications, David Edwards, will hit the ‘send’ button on his iPhone, and an email photograph tagged with the quintessential smell of New York — Pizza? The halal food trucks on 6th Avenue? The stench of horse piss on Central Park South? — will be delivered to a colleague in Paris, completing the first ever TransAtlantic transmission of a scent message.

The message, called an oNote, will be composed via an iPhone application called oSnap, soon to be available for free download in the Apple App store.

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Bikes Gave Their Lives To Be Reassembled As Famous Logos

Graphic designer Jennifer Beatty, a graduate student at the School of Visual Arts in New York, decided to use the shrapnel from once-loved but now broken bikes to create something else people can love: art. The idea emerged when Beatty and her fellow students were tasked with creating a 100 Days project, in which the artist performs one basic operation every day for 100 days—to eventually add up to a larger piece of art. Beatty’s is called 100 Hoopties, “hooptie” being a slang term for a beat-up old bike.

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Shadow Project Wins Latest Playful Smart Cities Initiative

An interactive public artwork involving shadows captured from passersby which interact with people who follow, winner of the 2014 Playable City Award announced June 9, will be installed in the city of Bristol by September.

"Shadowing"—created by design partnership Jonathan Chomko and Matthew Rosier, based in New York and Treviso, Italy, respectively—will use infrared technology to capture people’s outlines then project movement back as shadows once the people who have formed the shadows have moved on.

The project is designed to explore the disconnectedness that technology can create between strangers, the role light can play in creating a city’s character, and the unseen data alters and surveillance culture that pervades contemporary urban spaces, its creators claim.

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Wear This Fence From The Prison That Held Nelson Mandela
The 10-foot-high wire fence that once surrounded the infamous prison on Robben Island, off the coast of Cape Town, has a second life as jewelry. The prison is where Nelson Mandela spent 18 of the 27 years he served behind bars before Apartheid collapsed. Though the prison gates were opened in 1994, it wasn’t until 2009 that the eyesore of a fence itself was torn down. It was destined for the scrap metal heap—until a visiting artist, Chris Swift, intervened, and took pieces of the fence to display in art installations.
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Wear This Fence From The Prison That Held Nelson Mandela

The 10-foot-high wire fence that once surrounded the infamous prison on Robben Island, off the coast of Cape Town, has a second life as jewelry. The prison is where Nelson Mandela spent 18 of the 27 years he served behind bars before Apartheid collapsed. Though the prison gates were opened in 1994, it wasn’t until 2009 that the eyesore of a fence itself was torn down. It was destined for the scrap metal heap—until a visiting artist, Chris Swift, intervened, and took pieces of the fence to display in art installations.

Read More>

Celebrity Selfies Become Art With The “Phonies” Photo Series

U.K. photographer Dan Rubin (danrubin) recently embarked on a project to mash-up celebrity selfie culture with its more anonymous analogue. In “Phonies,” the photographer shoots random people on the street holding a smartphone over their faces like the apple in Magritte’s “Son of Man,”, only these phones bear the famous faces of Kim Kardashian, Lily Allen, and Aaron Paul. It’s a neat trick that seems to hold a mirror up to society and display how we all seem to want to be seen.

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