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The Bible Reduced To Minimalist Posters

The Bible is often referred to as the word of God. In reality, it’s significantly longer: around 775,000 words spread across 66 different books, when all is said and done. How do you distill the word of God down into a single cover, then? If you’re Joseph Novak, you don’t: you create a minimalist cover interpreting each and every one of the Bible’s many books.

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“As a child I dreamt of becoming an astronaut, now I create a universe myself.”If Salvador Dali had had access to today’s animation software, he might have made GIFs like the ones Chilean photographer Jon Jacobsen makes. More> Co.Design

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The creepiest and most mesmerizing video of the year so far might be of a sinister floating black orb that follows people around making weird ambient noises.
Watch> Co.Design

fastcodesign:

The creepiest and most mesmerizing video of the year so far might be of a sinister floating black orb that follows people around making weird ambient noises.

Watch> Co.Design

"There really are two kinds of food entrepreneurs," says venture capitalist Paul Matteucci, who encourages and connects food-tech upstarts through his not-for-profit, Feeding 10 Billion. “There are the ones that hang around Berkeley or Brooklyn, and build businesses mostly for the end consumer. Then there is a whole different group of highly technical people who are building robotics for the field, sensor-based technology, automated watering systems, new food-packaging technologies, and big-data-related inventory control to reduce waste.” These, he says, are “the people who are going to solve the big problems.”

A raft of entrepreneurs and venture capitalists made their money in tech, and now want to do something with an even longer-lasting impact. Meet the Silicon Valley companies trying to fix our broken food system

An artist has mapped the Internet, literally. According to this amazingly detailed feat of imaginative cartography, posted on the social network deviantART, you could navigate the “Ocean of Information” only to find yourself adrift on the northern island of Wikipedia (it looks a little like Greenland). 
Each landmass takes on the name of a popular English-language website or web service and is kinda sorta scaled to its popularity.

An artist has mapped the Internet, literally. According to this amazingly detailed feat of imaginative cartography, posted on the social network deviantART, you could navigate the “Ocean of Information” only to find yourself adrift on the northern island of Wikipedia (it looks a little like Greenland). 

Each landmass takes on the name of a popular English-language website or web service and is kinda sorta scaled to its popularity.