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These Pinecone-Shaped Drones Will Clean Your Personal Air Bubble

Making sure we live in a healthy world is a collective action problem. It doesn’t really work unless everyone—or at least a significant majority of countries, industries, and consumers—starts making radical changes in behavior. If that doesn’t work, one student designer envisions a future in which we resort to personal air quality drones.

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These Forests Of Light Are Projected On Famous Buildings, And You’re In The Picture

Planned for the big United Nations climate conference in Paris next year, Naziha Mestaoui’s “forests of light” show is really two light shows in one. The first is the public show on the buildings and monuments, which will be made up of trees generated in 3-D. The second is the image of the show on mobile phones, augmented with “unique virtual trees” attuned to each viewer’s heartbeat.

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This Photographer’s Instagram Depiction of People Falling Down Is a Beautiful Disaster
"We live in sad times when material things, expensive or not, have become more important then our own lives," the photographer says. "I started feeling the need to capture that exact moment—the moment of the impact. I wanted to do it ironically, and play down the seriousness. I enjoy the idea of people becoming victims of their own obsessive and compulsive neurosis, but there had to be a comical side to tragedy. If laughter leads to only one moment of thoughtfulness I will have accomplished my mission."
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This Photographer’s Instagram Depiction of People Falling Down Is a Beautiful Disaster

"We live in sad times when material things, expensive or not, have become more important then our own lives," the photographer says. "I started feeling the need to capture that exact moment—the moment of the impact. I wanted to do it ironically, and play down the seriousness. I enjoy the idea of people becoming victims of their own obsessive and compulsive neurosis, but there had to be a comical side to tragedy. If laughter leads to only one moment of thoughtfulness I will have accomplished my mission."

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The emotionally charged exhibition used wearable tech to recognize more than just great ideas.
A great piece of film will always elicit an emotional response, be it joy, discomfort, laughter, or a touch of melancholy. We’ve seen the trend in advertising, wherein brands are going right for the cockles of the heart with emotionally rich stories. But unless you shed a tear or break out in laughter, it’s hard for an outsider to know what you’re really feeling.
Saatchi & Saatchi tapped into those inner emotions with its New Directors Showcase—an annual selection of the best new directing talent that’s presented at Cannes—which it called Feel the Reel. Along with showing films, the NDS is famous for the accompanying grand theatrical piece. This year, the global agency network tapped wearable technology to mine individual emotional reactions to the work and visualize it for all to see. In short, if one of the 18 filmmakers’ films made you cry, it was visualized through a bracelet that changed color with your emotions.
“We literally monitored people’s individual reactions to what they were watching and not in a way that they can control,” says Andy Gulliman, Saatchi & Saatchi Worldwide Film and Content Director and the curator of this year’s reel. “We’ve monitored their body and how their natural emotions react. We then created data from that, which gave us a response to what they’re watching. So if the brain is thinking that you’re going to cry, then that light comes on.”
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The emotionally charged exhibition used wearable tech to recognize more than just great ideas.

A great piece of film will always elicit an emotional response, be it joy, discomfort, laughter, or a touch of melancholy. We’ve seen the trend in advertising, wherein brands are going right for the cockles of the heart with emotionally rich stories. But unless you shed a tear or break out in laughter, it’s hard for an outsider to know what you’re really feeling.

Saatchi & Saatchi tapped into those inner emotions with its New Directors Showcase—an annual selection of the best new directing talent that’s presented at Cannes—which it called Feel the Reel. Along with showing films, the NDS is famous for the accompanying grand theatrical piece. This year, the global agency network tapped wearable technology to mine individual emotional reactions to the work and visualize it for all to see. In short, if one of the 18 filmmakers’ films made you cry, it was visualized through a bracelet that changed color with your emotions.

“We literally monitored people’s individual reactions to what they were watching and not in a way that they can control,” says Andy Gulliman, Saatchi & Saatchi Worldwide Film and Content Director and the curator of this year’s reel. “We’ve monitored their body and how their natural emotions react. We then created data from that, which gave us a response to what they’re watching. So if the brain is thinking that you’re going to cry, then that light comes on.”

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Escape The Zombie Screen-Gaze: Stare At An Animated Sunset Instead
There are only a handful of places where you can see a sunset on the water here on the East Coast. I mean, after all, the sun sets in the West. (This is regionalism at its most offensive.) Our options? A few islands off the coast and parts of Cape Cod.
Thank goodness, then, for artist and developer Joseph Gray, who has created a pretty facsimile for those of us who don’t have access to a shimmering, watery sunset. Infinite Sunset is his answer. Composed of a few simple horizontal bars of colors, including warm yellows and reds and blues, it evokes the appearance of a sunset seascape. The colors are chosen from an automated Google Image Search for the term “sunset,” which is then parsed for its color palette and presented on your screen. (Take that, California!)
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Escape The Zombie Screen-Gaze: Stare At An Animated Sunset Instead

There are only a handful of places where you can see a sunset on the water here on the East Coast. I mean, after all, the sun sets in the West. (This is regionalism at its most offensive.) Our options? A few islands off the coast and parts of Cape Cod.

Thank goodness, then, for artist and developer Joseph Gray, who has created a pretty facsimile for those of us who don’t have access to a shimmering, watery sunset. Infinite Sunset is his answer. Composed of a few simple horizontal bars of colors, including warm yellows and reds and blues, it evokes the appearance of a sunset seascape. The colors are chosen from an automated Google Image Search for the term “sunset,” which is then parsed for its color palette and presented on your screen. (Take that, California!)

Read More>

This Is An Air Conditioner Igloo, Because Running Our AC Means Destroying Igloos
Air-conditioning units are like the acne of apartment buildings. But not only are they ugly; they also demand quite a bit of electricity, which too often results in the burning of fossil fuels. In order to highlight the issue, one artist decided to make AC units unavoidable—by placing 45 of them in the bustling Serbian capital of Belgrade, where people couldn’t help but look.
"Some people got angry, because I put all this trash in the middle of the pedestrian area," she wrote. "Some people liked it, because you could chill out inside like in a little shelter and smoke or drink. Some others started a discussion about climate change on a Serbian blog. That’s why I love to work in public space, because you get an immediate response from passersby."
Read More>

This Is An Air Conditioner Igloo, Because Running Our AC Means Destroying Igloos

Air-conditioning units are like the acne of apartment buildings. But not only are they ugly; they also demand quite a bit of electricity, which too often results in the burning of fossil fuels. In order to highlight the issue, one artist decided to make AC units unavoidable—by placing 45 of them in the bustling Serbian capital of Belgrade, where people couldn’t help but look.

"Some people got angry, because I put all this trash in the middle of the pedestrian area," she wrote. "Some people liked it, because you could chill out inside like in a little shelter and smoke or drink. Some others started a discussion about climate change on a Serbian blog. That’s why I love to work in public space, because you get an immediate response from passersby."

Read More>

This Fake Fast-Food Restaurant Is Actually Serving Money To Homeless People
Finnish artist Jani Leinonen has set up a Hunger King installation in Budapest that draws attention to Hungary’s conflicting policies toward the rich and the poor. Visitors choose between getting in “rich” or “poor” lines, with signage on either side revealing stats about inequality in taxes and education opportunities, fines for vagrancy, and other points. The first 50 people in the “poor” line each day are greeted with a clamshell burger box holding the equivalent of about $15, the daily minimum wage in Budapest. Visitors to the “rich” line get a fake burger and fake fries, and an appeal toward activism.
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This Fake Fast-Food Restaurant Is Actually Serving Money To Homeless People

Finnish artist Jani Leinonen has set up a Hunger King installation in Budapest that draws attention to Hungary’s conflicting policies toward the rich and the poor. Visitors choose between getting in “rich” or “poor” lines, with signage on either side revealing stats about inequality in taxes and education opportunities, fines for vagrancy, and other points. The first 50 people in the “poor” line each day are greeted with a clamshell burger box holding the equivalent of about $15, the daily minimum wage in Budapest. Visitors to the “rich” line get a fake burger and fake fries, and an appeal toward activism.

Watch>

In her series “Sound Form Wave,” Ukrainian designer Anna Marinenko draws a fresh comparison between visualized sound waves and jaggedly oscillating patterns in our natural environments. Mountain ranges, cityscapes, far-off tree lines, jet streams, and speedboat wakes are juxtaposed with graphics that reconsider their shapes as sound frequencies. The effect is at first beautiful—because the images blend so well. And then, as your eye adjusts, the effect is slightly jarring.
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In her series “Sound Form Wave,” Ukrainian designer Anna Marinenko draws a fresh comparison between visualized sound waves and jaggedly oscillating patterns in our natural environments. Mountain ranges, cityscapes, far-off tree lines, jet streams, and speedboat wakes are juxtaposed with graphics that reconsider their shapes as sound frequencies. The effect is at first beautiful—because the images blend so well. And then, as your eye adjusts, the effect is slightly jarring.

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