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New York City Street Stencils Remind Us Where Cars Have Killed Pedestrians
When pedestrian advocacy group Right of Way started drawing chalk body outlines at intersections where cars mowed down New York City pedestrians in the early ’90s, it wanted to send a message to the NYPD and to the city. “To think there was a crime committed here, and then to think about how that’s not normally considered a crime, or a tragedy even,” says Right of Way organizer Keegan Stephan.
In early August of this year, Right of Way revived its old mission. Upon request from the families of victims killed by cars, the organization walked and cycled to the locations of 12 fatal collisions, sprayed an ornate stencil of white, outstretched wings designed by artist Robyn Renee Hasty, and gave space for loved ones to grieve.
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New York City Street Stencils Remind Us Where Cars Have Killed Pedestrians

When pedestrian advocacy group Right of Way started drawing chalk body outlines at intersections where cars mowed down New York City pedestrians in the early ’90s, it wanted to send a message to the NYPD and to the city. “To think there was a crime committed here, and then to think about how that’s not normally considered a crime, or a tragedy even,” says Right of Way organizer Keegan Stephan.

In early August of this year, Right of Way revived its old mission. Upon request from the families of victims killed by cars, the organization walked and cycled to the locations of 12 fatal collisions, sprayed an ornate stencil of white, outstretched wings designed by artist Robyn Renee Hasty, and gave space for loved ones to grieve.

See More>

This Mexican Cemetery Becomes A Living Cartoon At Night
Stretching over 590 acres, the Panteón de Dolores is Mexico’s largest cemetery, and contains over 700,000 tombs, gravestones, and sculptures. With all of those slabs of granite and marble around, the Mexico City animation collective Llama Rada got to thinking: “What if we use the tombstones of the cemetery as screens to project a vibrant, living cartoon?”
Read More>

This Mexican Cemetery Becomes A Living Cartoon At Night

Stretching over 590 acres, the Panteón de Dolores is Mexico’s largest cemetery, and contains over 700,000 tombs, gravestones, and sculptures. With all of those slabs of granite and marble around, the Mexico City animation collective Llama Rada got to thinking: “What if we use the tombstones of the cemetery as screens to project a vibrant, living cartoon?”

Read More>

International artists that tinker heavily with computers to create their work are called “glitch artists.” They produce a type of new media art that lays out defects—glitches—in a given computer system onto a visual canvas, whether it’s print, 3-D installation, or computer screen.
A new exhibit at the Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art in Chicago is celebrating their work, but why? Historically, humans have been indifferent to non-human art; none of Koko the Gorilla’s drawings appear in the Louvre. So will art fans flock to glitch art? Or are these digital artifacts only a mother(board) could love?
Read More>

International artists that tinker heavily with computers to create their work are called “glitch artists.” They produce a type of new media art that lays out defects—glitches—in a given computer system onto a visual canvas, whether it’s print, 3-D installation, or computer screen.

A new exhibit at the Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art in Chicago is celebrating their work, but why? Historically, humans have been indifferent to non-human art; none of Koko the Gorilla’s drawings appear in the Louvre. So will art fans flock to glitch art? Or are these digital artifacts only a mother(board) could love?

Read More>

From a zen garden to a pet rabbit, at first, no silly luxury was spared for a co-working space set up by two Dutch designers. But soon, things started suspiciously changing, until the office was something out of 1984.
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From a zen garden to a pet rabbit, at first, no silly luxury was spared for a co-working space set up by two Dutch designers. But soon, things started suspiciously changing, until the office was something out of 1984.

Read More>

wnyc:

New York City’s water towers are iconic, and starting this month, a hundred of them will be covered in artwork created by Jeff Koons, Maya Lin, and other artists to raise awareness of global water problems and encourage New Yorkers to drink their tap water. MORE

wnyc:

New York City’s water towers are iconic, and starting this month, a hundred of them will be covered in artwork created by Jeff Koons, Maya Lin, and other artists to raise awareness of global water problems and encourage New Yorkers to drink their tap water. MORE