FastCompany Magazine

The official Tumblr of Fast Company.

fastcodesign:

It sounds like something out of a Dario Argento film: soaring architecture built with fresh blood and sand. It’s no camp horror movie, though—rather, it’s an award-winning proposal from recent architecture school graduate Jack Munro. “Animal blood is one of the most prolific waste materials in the world,” says Munro, a 2012 graduate of University of Westminster in London. “The blood drained from animal carcasses is generally thrown away or incinerated despite being a potentially useful product.”

fastcodesign:

It sounds like something out of a Dario Argento film: soaring architecture built with fresh blood and sand. It’s no camp horror movie, though—rather, it’s an award-winning proposal from recent architecture school graduate Jack Munro. 

“Animal blood is one of the most prolific waste materials in the world,” says Munro, a 2012 graduate of University of Westminster in London. “The blood drained from animal carcasses is generally thrown away or incinerated despite being a potentially useful product.”

(via fastcodesign)


“I remember that very deeply in my soul back in 1986, we felt that was unfair,” says Kelley Lindquist, who became the president of a nonprofit called Artspace in 1987. “It was insulting for people to sometimes say, ‘Oh, artists like to move, they’re bohemians!’ Who likes to be on the street and renegotiate a lease and carry all their equipment and try to create a new community and basically start all over?”

The Key To A Thriving Creative Class? Give Artists Their Own Real Estate Developers 
It worked for St. Paul, Minnesota, where artists revived an old warehouse district—and got to stick around to reap the benefits of what they helped create.

“I remember that very deeply in my soul back in 1986, we felt that was unfair,” says Kelley Lindquist, who became the president of a nonprofit called Artspace in 1987. “It was insulting for people to sometimes say, ‘Oh, artists like to move, they’re bohemians!’ Who likes to be on the street and renegotiate a lease and carry all their equipment and try to create a new community and basically start all over?”

The Key To A Thriving Creative Class? Give Artists Their Own Real Estate Developers

It worked for St. Paul, Minnesota, where artists revived an old warehouse district—and got to stick around to reap the benefits of what they helped create.