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Like a lot of cities that want to encourage more people to bike, the town of Drammer, Norway, had a parking problem: There just weren’t enough bike racks to go around. So the city built a “bike hotel.”
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Like a lot of cities that want to encourage more people to bike, the town of Drammer, Norway, had a parking problem: There just weren’t enough bike racks to go around. So the city built a “bike hotel.”

Read More>

True love is no match for a starchitect’s labyrinth. Yesterday, two lovebirds got engaged in the middle of Bjarke Ingels Group’s giant wooden maze inside the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C. The couple, identified by the National Building Museum as Erin O’Connor and Peter Dwyer, went to the museum on their first date.
The whole heartwarming event was filmed from a balcony:
Watch>

True love is no match for a starchitect’s labyrinth. Yesterday, two lovebirds got engaged in the middle of Bjarke Ingels Group’s giant wooden maze inside the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C. The couple, identified by the National Building Museum as Erin O’Connor and Peter Dwyer, went to the museum on their first date.

The whole heartwarming event was filmed from a balcony:

Watch>

America’s Oddly Beautiful Suburban Sprawl, Photographed From The Sky

Urban sprawl is the type of thing you tend to forget about if you’re living in it, except maybe when you’re stuck in traffic inching home after work. But it does a lot more than cause road rage: Sprawl also makes us fatter, sicker, and poorer, and it’s the source of half of the country’s household carbon footprint. In a series of photos taken over seven years, now published in a new book called Ciphers, photographer Christoph Gielen shows a different perspective on sprawl, intended to get more people to question typical patterns of development.

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And why architects need to do more to ensure women’s reproductive rights
The SCOTUS ruling serves yet another blow to those hoping to provide safe and accessible reproductive health services to women. While other building types have benefited from the expertise of architects when addressing public safety issues—think, for instance, of the architectural interventions around safety, wayfinding, and crowd control at hospitals, federal buildings, courthouses, and stadiums—reproductive health care clinics rarely see that kind of design support. Clinics are left to fend for themselves and, as a result, are forced to create ad hoc buffer zones where architectural and legislative options have failed to deliver.
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And why architects need to do more to ensure women’s reproductive rights

The SCOTUS ruling serves yet another blow to those hoping to provide safe and accessible reproductive health services to women. While other building types have benefited from the expertise of architects when addressing public safety issues—think, for instance, of the architectural interventions around safety, wayfinding, and crowd control at hospitals, federal buildings, courthouses, and stadiums—reproductive health care clinics rarely see that kind of design support. Clinics are left to fend for themselves and, as a result, are forced to create ad hoc buffer zones where architectural and legislative options have failed to deliver.

Read More>

Visit the campus of health care software provider Epic Systems and you’re as likely to run into a cow or an alfalfa farmer as you are a conference room.
While companies such as Twitter and Facebook consume ever-larger offices in San Francisco and the Valley, at one major software firm, you’ll find its employees in a completely opposite setting: a bucolic farm.
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Visit the campus of health care software provider Epic Systems and you’re as likely to run into a cow or an alfalfa farmer as you are a conference room.

While companies such as Twitter and Facebook consume ever-larger offices in San Francisco and the Valley, at one major software firm, you’ll find its employees in a completely opposite setting: a bucolic farm.

Read More>

We have designed cities to make people ill.

"We are all suffering from the bad design in the world," Thomas Fisher, an architecture professor and dean of the University of Minnesota’s design college, declared at a panel at the American Institute of Architects convention in Chicago yesterday. Fisher was part of a discussion on the link between public health and architecture with Heather R. Britt and Jess Roberts of Allina Health, a Minnesota-based not-for-profit health care system.

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(via fastcodesign)

This Band Of Small Robots Could Build Entire Skyscrapers Without Human Help
Even though most buildings are designed using the latest digital tools, actual construction is stuck in the past; building is messy, slow, and inefficient. 3-D printing might change that, but recent projects like these printed houses in China demonstrate one of the technical challenges—the equipment itself has to be gigantic, because it can’t work unless it’s bigger than the building itself.
A team of researchers from Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia are working on another solution: A swarm of tiny robots that could cover the construction site of the future, quickly and cheaply building greener buildings of any size.
Read More>

This Band Of Small Robots Could Build Entire Skyscrapers Without Human Help

Even though most buildings are designed using the latest digital tools, actual construction is stuck in the past; building is messy, slow, and inefficient. 3-D printing might change that, but recent projects like these printed houses in China demonstrate one of the technical challenges—the equipment itself has to be gigantic, because it can’t work unless it’s bigger than the building itself.

A team of researchers from Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia are working on another solution: A swarm of tiny robots that could cover the construction site of the future, quickly and cheaply building greener buildings of any size.

Read More>