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Meredith Fineman, CEO of FinePoint digital PR, loved our list of little-known apps that entrepreneurs can’t live without, but she noticed that no female founders were interviewed. So she made a few calls and now we have a list little-known apps that some amazing female entrepreneurs love:

  • Tina Wells, author and CEO of Buzz Marketing, loves blog curating app Bloglovin.
  • Leandra Medine, creator of fashion site Man Repeller, loves Definer, which she describes as a ‘mobile urban dictionary.’
  • Rachal Sklar, writer and social entrepreneur and creator of The Li.st, is a big fan of HelloFax.

Here are 8 more little-known apps that entrepreneurs can’t live with out.

Tumblr has fixed a security flaw it found on its iOS app.
Very little information was given about the bug, but the firm suggested users change their passwords immediately.
This was posted yesterday on the staff blog.

We have just released a very important security update for our iPhone and iPad apps addressing an issue that allowed passwords to be compromised in certain circumstances. Please download the update now.
If you’ve been using these apps, you should also update your password on Tumblr and anywhere else you may have been using the same password. 
Please know that we take your security very seriously and are tremendously sorry for this lapse and inconvenience.

So change your password peeps!

Tumblr has fixed a security flaw it found on its iOS app.

Very little information was given about the bug, but the firm suggested users change their passwords immediately.

This was posted yesterday on the staff blog.

We have just released a very important security update for our iPhone and iPad apps addressing an issue that allowed passwords to be compromised in certain circumstances. Please download the update now.

If you’ve been using these apps, you should also update your password on Tumblr and anywhere else you may have been using the same password. 

Please know that we take your security very seriously and are tremendously sorry for this lapse and inconvenience.

So change your password peeps!

Looking for some great new app suggestions? Here, a few:

  • The Definer app: “My favorite app I use for business—which is actually not really for business—is Definer which is effectively a mobile urban dictionary. You make up words, define them and then share them with your network. I think I’m even considering it a ‘business app’ because it trains my mind to think creatively even when I don’t necessarily feel like thinking. Often, those words transcend the boundaries of the app and end up on my site in some form.” —Leandra Medine, who writes writes the Man Repeller—a humorous site about serious fashion

  • The Bloglovin’ app"My new obsession is Bloglovin’. If you’ve got 5 minutes, you can catch up on all of the street style news you need for the day. I curated a list of bloggers I love (like Olivia Palermo and Ashley Madekwe, and all updates are sent to this handy little app. With a business that forecasts Millenial trends, this makes it easy." Tina Wells, CEO of Buzz Marketing

More here: 11 little-known apps entrepreneurs can’t live without

Garmin has come up with a windshield-mounted device that projects directions from Android and iPhone navigation apps right on the dashboard.
The Heads-Up Display (HUD), which sells for $130, is Garmin’s attempt to keep up with automakers who are installing smartphone apps directly into car dashboards. If Garmin can’t beat app makers for in-car presence, well, it’ll have to join them.
[Image: Garmin]

Garmin has come up with a windshield-mounted device that projects directions from Android and iPhone navigation apps right on the dashboard.

The Heads-Up Display (HUD), which sells for $130, is Garmin’s attempt to keep up with automakers who are installing smartphone apps directly into car dashboards. If Garmin can’t beat app makers for in-car presence, well, it’ll have to join them.

[Image: Garmin]

NeverLate is an iPhone app that allows your calendar to cross reference the traffic report. So rather than merely warning you that a meeting is in 10 minutes, it can dynamically ping you, right when you should leave for that meeting, given unforeseen road construction, accidents, or just one of those backups where everyone is simply hitting their brakes too much. Meanwhile, you can focus entirely on getting ready, rather than digging through traffic reports.
“After you’ve used the app for about a week, NeverLate will learn where your home and work are and when you’re normally there.”
More info

NeverLate is an iPhone app that allows your calendar to cross reference the traffic report. So rather than merely warning you that a meeting is in 10 minutes, it can dynamically ping you, right when you should leave for that meeting, given unforeseen road construction, accidents, or just one of those backups where everyone is simply hitting their brakes too much. Meanwhile, you can focus entirely on getting ready, rather than digging through traffic reports.

“After you’ve used the app for about a week, NeverLate will learn where your home and work are and when you’re normally there.”

More info

The 6 Best Alternative To Do Apps

Here are some upcoming apps to suit all personalities, from the type-A’s to the guilt free procrastinators.

Mobile to-do lists such as Clear, Evernote, and Google Keep get a lot of love online, but they’re not alone when it comes to high-quality apps to keep track of everything you need to do in a day.
In fact, a simple “to do list” app search on Google yields 1.9 billion results, a lofty number to sift through if you’re already drowning in tasks. Thankfully, there are a few gems rising to the top of the to-do list category, including these six:
For the guilt-free procrastinatorDo It (Tomorrow) HD (iOS/Android - FREE; iPad - $4.99)
For the team leaderAnyList (iOS - FREE)
For the goal-setterLift (iOS - FREE)
For the task-masterDoit.im (iOS/Android - FREE)
For the inbox ninjaHandle (iOS - FREE)
For the big plannerTrello (iOS/Android/Windows - FREE)
What’s your favorite to-do list app?

The 6 Best Alternative To Do Apps

Here are some upcoming apps to suit all personalities, from the type-A’s to the guilt free procrastinators.

Mobile to-do lists such as Clear, Evernote, and Google Keep get a lot of love online, but they’re not alone when it comes to high-quality apps to keep track of everything you need to do in a day.

In fact, a simple “to do list” app search on Google yields 1.9 billion results, a lofty number to sift through if you’re already drowning in tasks. Thankfully, there are a few gems rising to the top of the to-do list category, including these six:

For the guilt-free procrastinator
Do It (Tomorrow) HD (iOS/Android - FREE; iPad - $4.99)

For the team leader
AnyList (iOS - FREE)

For the goal-setter
Lift (iOS - FREE)

For the task-master
Doit.im (iOS/Android - FREE)

For the inbox ninja
Handle (iOS - FREE)

For the big planner
Trello (iOS/Android/Windows - FREE)

What’s your favorite to-do list app?

10 Little Known Apps That Entrepreneurs Can’t Live Without

Writer Leo Widrich offers a sneak peek at the next wave of productivity apps that top entrepreneurs like Tim Ferriss, Seth Godin, and Guy Kawasaki are working with daily.

Recently something terribly obvious—yet powerful—occurred to me: If you want to achieve things that no one else has done, you need to do things no one else does.
So, I thought, who achieves things that very few do? I made a list of the top 10 entrepreneurs that I learn from daily. Then I thought, which things are they doing that could really help more people? When I emailed the idea to my Fast Company editor, she came back with something I found valuable:
“One of the problems that crops up is that a lot of people get back with “I love Twitter, Dropbox, and Evernote!” Those are great tools, but might not add that much value for our readers.”
I thought that observation was spot-on. So instead, I asked my favorite entrepreneurs their absolute favorite, yet very little-known tools, they use to achieve everyday tasks.
After lots of correspondences and digging deep into these entrepreneurs’ toolkits, here are their unedited answers:
Tim Ferriss’s top tool: Jumpcut
Tim Ferriss is the #1 New York Times best-selling author of The 4-Hour Workweek. Tim is the master of finding unique lifehacks and techniques to help you live a smarter life. The one online tool he absolutely can’t live without is Jumpcut:
"I can’t live without Jumpcut, which saves my ass all the time. Have you ever cut and pasted two or three things, and lost a hugely important thing that you cut first? Jumpcut, which is free, allows you to store (and easily retrieve) 40+ copied or cut things from your clipboard."
Michael Hyatt’s top tool: Clicky
Michael Hyatt is the New York Times best-selling author of Platform: Get Noticed in a Noisy World and he writes one of the best blogs on leadership and productivity that I know. Here is his most treasured online tool:
“My can’t-live-without online tool is Clicky.com. It’s what I use to monitor up-to-the-minute stats on all my websites. It uses Google Analytics, but presents the data in a more useful manner.”
Jay Baer’s top tool: Buffer
Ranked as one of America’s top 5 Social Media consultants and author of Youtility, Jay Baer built an incredible following as one of the most reputable and yet hype-free people in the industry. And he stays on top with the best tools all the time; his choice is Buffer (which—disclaimer time—I’m the cofounder of. Thanks, Jay!):
“Directing people to what I believe to be the most worthy social and content marketing resources every day—for years—is how I built my business. Buffer makes that process of sharing information to audiences so much easier. I can read articles in the morning and add them to my Buffer. From there articles then get posted well spaced out over the day, automatically.”
Hiten Shah’s top tool: Prismatic
One of my favorite tech entrepreneurs is Hiten Shah, cofounder of KISSmetrics, who, if you follow his Twitter feed, constantly inspires with amazing content. The one tool that he said he can’t live without is Prismatic:
“I love to find and share awesome content. Prismatic has made it easier for me to find the best content faster. Now with Prismatic, I don’t have to go to dozens of places to find useful, informative, and awesome content to share.”
Jason Calacanis’ top tool: 15Five
One of the most well-known entrepreneurs, Jason Calacanis has founded several companies to date and is now probably best known for his awesome ThisWeekInTV network. When I asked him for his favorite tool, he replied within a few minutes of sending the email without hesitation:
“15Five is my favorite app because it develops deep relationships on our teams quickly and efficiently. I liked it so much I asked to invest… and they took my money.”
Dharmesh Shah’s top tool: Pocket
There are very few people whose every step they take online I follow along with. Dharmesh, the CTO ofHubSpot, is one of them. He built a massive company with hundreds of people, and what helps him do his best work? He shared this:
“I love GetPocket.com. I’m easily distracted (I have “Hey look, interesting new article on the Internet!” syndrome). Pocket helps me stay focused by deferring things I want to read until later so I don’t break my flow.”
Seth Godin’s top tool: Keynote presenter view
Seth Godin, author of the most amazing books, and recently the Icarus Deception, writes a blog that is the only one I read daily. Asked for the one tool he he can’t live without, he said “the presenter view in Keynote, which shows me my next slide before anyone else sees it. I can’t imagine giving a fluid talk without it.”
Leo Babauta’s top tool: HackerNews
The infamous Leo Babauta writes the phenomenal blogzenhabits and is also author of multiple books. Whenever my day gets slightly too much, reading one of his articles for just a few minutes helps me clear my mind. So what helps Leo to get more inspiration and productivity? This:
"I use Hacker News for inspiration and ideas. I avoid most news sites, social media and other sources of information because there’s too much noise. But HN is curated by a smart group of users, has high signal-to-noise ratio, and is where new ideas and tiny startups are being tested at the street level, unfiltered by the media and mass markets."
Rand Fishkin’s top tool: TINYpulse
Rand Fishkin is the CEO and cofounder of SEOmoz. Rand also gives some of the best advice for startups and businesses on his personal blog. When I asked him for his favorite, little-known tool, he had a great gem for you:
“One of my very favorite tools is TinyPulse. It sends a very short survey to everyone at Moz, asking two simple questions. It’s an incredibly valuable way to get honest, direct feedback about how things are going culture/team-wise.”
Guy Kawasaki’s top tool: Fantastical
Guy Kawasaki is a man who needs little introduction. He was the chief evangelist at Apple and has since then authored more than 10 books. When I asked him what helps him to keep up with his crazy schedule, this is what he came up with:
“Fantastical. Great way to see and edit your calendar without launching your calendar application and switching to it. Very smart, too: ‘4/24 7 pm Meet with Leo’ would create an event.”
[Image: Flickr user Zechariah Judy]
What is your favorite productivity app and what would you add?

10 Little Known Apps That Entrepreneurs Can’t Live Without

Writer Leo Widrich offers a sneak peek at the next wave of productivity apps that top entrepreneurs like Tim Ferriss, Seth Godin, and Guy Kawasaki are working with daily.

Recently something terribly obvious—yet powerful—occurred to me: If you want to achieve things that no one else has done, you need to do things no one else does.

So, I thought, who achieves things that very few do? I made a list of the top 10 entrepreneurs that I learn from daily. Then I thought, which things are they doing that could really help more people? When I emailed the idea to my Fast Company editor, she came back with something I found valuable:

“One of the problems that crops up is that a lot of people get back with “I love Twitter, Dropbox, and Evernote!” Those are great tools, but might not add that much value for our readers.”

I thought that observation was spot-on. So instead, I asked my favorite entrepreneurs their absolute favorite, yet very little-known tools, they use to achieve everyday tasks.

After lots of correspondences and digging deep into these entrepreneurs’ toolkits, here are their unedited answers:

Tim Ferriss’s top tool: Jumpcut

Tim Ferriss is the #1 New York Times best-selling author of The 4-Hour Workweek. Tim is the master of finding unique lifehacks and techniques to help you live a smarter life. The one online tool he absolutely can’t live without is Jumpcut:

"I can’t live without Jumpcut, which saves my ass all the time. Have you ever cut and pasted two or three things, and lost a hugely important thing that you cut first? Jumpcut, which is free, allows you to store (and easily retrieve) 40+ copied or cut things from your clipboard."

Michael Hyatt’s top tool: Clicky

Michael Hyatt is the New York Times best-selling author of Platform: Get Noticed in a Noisy World and he writes one of the best blogs on leadership and productivity that I know. Here is his most treasured online tool:

“My can’t-live-without online tool is Clicky.com. It’s what I use to monitor up-to-the-minute stats on all my websites. It uses Google Analytics, but presents the data in a more useful manner.”

Jay Baer’s top tool: Buffer

Ranked as one of America’s top 5 Social Media consultants and author of Youtility, Jay Baer built an incredible following as one of the most reputable and yet hype-free people in the industry. And he stays on top with the best tools all the time; his choice is Buffer (which—disclaimer time—I’m the cofounder of. Thanks, Jay!):

“Directing people to what I believe to be the most worthy social and content marketing resources every day—for years—is how I built my business. Buffer makes that process of sharing information to audiences so much easier. I can read articles in the morning and add them to my Buffer. From there articles then get posted well spaced out over the day, automatically.”

Hiten Shah’s top tool: Prismatic

One of my favorite tech entrepreneurs is Hiten Shah, cofounder of KISSmetrics, who, if you follow his Twitter feed, constantly inspires with amazing content. The one tool that he said he can’t live without is Prismatic:

“I love to find and share awesome content. Prismatic has made it easier for me to find the best content faster. Now with Prismatic, I don’t have to go to dozens of places to find useful, informative, and awesome content to share.”

Jason Calacanis’ top tool: 15Five

One of the most well-known entrepreneurs, Jason Calacanis has founded several companies to date and is now probably best known for his awesome ThisWeekInTV network. When I asked him for his favorite tool, he replied within a few minutes of sending the email without hesitation:

“15Five is my favorite app because it develops deep relationships on our teams quickly and efficiently. I liked it so much I asked to invest… and they took my money.”

Dharmesh Shah’s top tool: Pocket

There are very few people whose every step they take online I follow along with. Dharmesh, the CTO ofHubSpot, is one of them. He built a massive company with hundreds of people, and what helps him do his best work? He shared this:

“I love GetPocket.com. I’m easily distracted (I have “Hey look, interesting new article on the Internet!” syndrome). Pocket helps me stay focused by deferring things I want to read until later so I don’t break my flow.”

Seth Godin’s top tool: Keynote presenter view

Seth Godin, author of the most amazing books, and recently the Icarus Deception, writes a blog that is the only one I read daily. Asked for the one tool he he can’t live without, he said “the presenter view in Keynote, which shows me my next slide before anyone else sees it. I can’t imagine giving a fluid talk without it.”

Leo Babauta’s top tool: HackerNews

The infamous Leo Babauta writes the phenomenal blogzenhabits and is also author of multiple books. Whenever my day gets slightly too much, reading one of his articles for just a few minutes helps me clear my mind. So what helps Leo to get more inspiration and productivity? This:

"I use Hacker News for inspiration and ideas. I avoid most news sites, social media and other sources of information because there’s too much noise. But HN is curated by a smart group of users, has high signal-to-noise ratio, and is where new ideas and tiny startups are being tested at the street level, unfiltered by the media and mass markets."

Rand Fishkin’s top tool: TINYpulse

Rand Fishkin is the CEO and cofounder of SEOmoz. Rand also gives some of the best advice for startups and businesses on his personal blog. When I asked him for his favorite, little-known tool, he had a great gem for you:

“One of my very favorite tools is TinyPulse. It sends a very short survey to everyone at Moz, asking two simple questions. It’s an incredibly valuable way to get honest, direct feedback about how things are going culture/team-wise.”

Guy Kawasaki’s top tool: Fantastical

Guy Kawasaki is a man who needs little introduction. He was the chief evangelist at Apple and has since then authored more than 10 books. When I asked him what helps him to keep up with his crazy schedule, this is what he came up with:

“Fantastical. Great way to see and edit your calendar without launching your calendar application and switching to it. Very smart, too: ‘4/24 7 pm Meet with Leo’ would create an event.”

[Image: Flickr user Zechariah Judy]

What is your favorite productivity app and what would you add?

Today, Foursquare will introduce a new version of its iPhone app that streamlines the app’s user interface and refines its purpose.

Today, Foursquare will introduce a new version of its iPhone app that streamlines the app’s user interface and refines its purpose.

(Source: Fast Company)

Must-Have Apps To Make The Most Of SXSW
chmoozing is the name of the game at any conference, but this is the technorati big leagues. Get these apps to keep up with the digital Joneses.
Highlight
Highlight runs in the background on your phone and tells you when interesting people are nearby. If you’re at an interesting tech conference, it quickly becomes completely addictive. I first used it at South By Southwest 2012 and ended up uninstalling it because it just completely drained my battery. I decided to give it another shot at CES 2013, and again found it extremely useful—even using it to stalk Robert Scoble at one point (to no avail…yet).
CardMunch
CardMunch takes a picture of business cards, converts them to text, and then lets you connect on LinkedIn and/or save to your phone’s contacts. Business cards suck and it baffles me that we still use them; CardMunch helps immensely.
LinkedIn
This likely needs no explanation. If you use LinkedIn on the web, you can also use it via the mobile app. You’re at a conference. You’re going to meet new people. LinkedIn is great for staying connected after you’ve gone home.
TripIt
Nine times out of 10, attending a conference means traveling. This means coordinating airfare and accommodations for yourself and communicating those plans with others. Enter TripIt. TripIt makes it easy to store your travel plans in a centralized place that can be easily shared. All you do is connect your email or forward itineraries to an email address provided by TripIt and it handles the rest.
Evernote Hello
Hello is a newish mobile app by Evernote that helps you create rich notes about people you meet. Kicker—it let’s you exchange contact info more easily. Kicker-kicker—it saves history and notes to your Evernote account (duh).
Eventbrite
The best part of any conference is what happens after hours. There are meetups, parties, you name it. Most events at most major conferences seem to use Eventbrite for RSVPs. Bringing a printed-out RSVP confirmation to a party is the conference equivalent of having your mom drop you off at a party in high school. On the off chance that you actually need the confirmation, install the Eventbrite app on your phone
Bloodhound
Bloodhound touts itself as “the complete mobile solution for events.” Features include networking via Facebook and LinkedIn, live Twitter feeds, maps, schedules, and exhibitor information. If you had to pick one app on the list to try out, this will provide the most breadth in terms of features and functionality.
Speek
You didn’t expect me not to plug my own app, did you? One of the hardest things about going away for a week to attend a conference is dealing with work stuff back home. At the very minimum, you’re going to end up dialing into conference calls while you’re away.Speek is a fast and easy way to join conference calls and our apps provide a single click experience for joining. Also, one founder has tattoos and amazing hair. Just sayin’.
Conference-specific Apps
These days every conference rolls out mobile apps just for the annual event. CES had one this year, and so will SXSW. Although the quality and usefulness of these apps vary, it’s typically in your best interest to go ahead and install them and find out.
SXSW Go is available for iPhone and Android.
[Image: Flickr user Steve Garfield]

Must-Have Apps To Make The Most Of SXSW

chmoozing is the name of the game at any conference, but this is the technorati big leagues. Get these apps to keep up with the digital Joneses.

Highlight

Highlight runs in the background on your phone and tells you when interesting people are nearby. If you’re at an interesting tech conference, it quickly becomes completely addictive. I first used it at South By Southwest 2012 and ended up uninstalling it because it just completely drained my battery. I decided to give it another shot at CES 2013, and again found it extremely useful—even using it to stalk Robert Scoble at one point (to no avail…yet).

CardMunch

CardMunch takes a picture of business cards, converts them to text, and then lets you connect on LinkedIn and/or save to your phone’s contacts. Business cards suck and it baffles me that we still use them; CardMunch helps immensely.

LinkedIn

This likely needs no explanation. If you use LinkedIn on the web, you can also use it via the mobile app. You’re at a conference. You’re going to meet new people. LinkedIn is great for staying connected after you’ve gone home.

TripIt

Nine times out of 10, attending a conference means traveling. This means coordinating airfare and accommodations for yourself and communicating those plans with others. Enter TripIt. TripIt makes it easy to store your travel plans in a centralized place that can be easily shared. All you do is connect your email or forward itineraries to an email address provided by TripIt and it handles the rest.

Evernote Hello

Hello is a newish mobile app by Evernote that helps you create rich notes about people you meet. Kicker—it let’s you exchange contact info more easily. Kicker-kicker—it saves history and notes to your Evernote account (duh).

Eventbrite

The best part of any conference is what happens after hours. There are meetups, parties, you name it. Most events at most major conferences seem to use Eventbrite for RSVPs. Bringing a printed-out RSVP confirmation to a party is the conference equivalent of having your mom drop you off at a party in high school. On the off chance that you actually need the confirmation, install the Eventbrite app on your phone

Bloodhound

Bloodhound touts itself as “the complete mobile solution for events.” Features include networking via Facebook and LinkedIn, live Twitter feeds, maps, schedules, and exhibitor information. If you had to pick one app on the list to try out, this will provide the most breadth in terms of features and functionality.

Speek

You didn’t expect me not to plug my own app, did you? One of the hardest things about going away for a week to attend a conference is dealing with work stuff back home. At the very minimum, you’re going to end up dialing into conference calls while you’re away.Speek is a fast and easy way to join conference calls and our apps provide a single click experience for joining. Also, one founder has tattoos and amazing hair. Just sayin’.

Conference-specific Apps

These days every conference rolls out mobile apps just for the annual event. CES had one this year, and so will SXSW. Although the quality and usefulness of these apps vary, it’s typically in your best interest to go ahead and install them and find out.

SXSW Go is available for iPhone and Android.

[Image: Flickr user Steve Garfield]