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Yo, Here’s That Ridiculous-Sounding Million-Dollar App Everyone Wants To Try
A new messaging app that does one thing and one thing only “really helps cut through the noise,” says its creator.
Yo is a new messaging app that launched out of beta today. Unlike other messaging apps, you can’t send messages. All you can do is send a push notification bearing a two-letter greeting: “Yo.”
Yes, it is stupid in the same way Flappy Bird was stupid. Yo looks like a prank. Using it feels like a prank. But, as more than one reputable publication has mentioned, Yo is not an elaborate hoax—though it was submitted to the App Store on April 1st. It is merely a goofy idea taken to its illogical extreme.
Read More>

Yo, Here’s That Ridiculous-Sounding Million-Dollar App Everyone Wants To Try

A new messaging app that does one thing and one thing only “really helps cut through the noise,” says its creator.

Yo is a new messaging app that launched out of beta today. Unlike other messaging apps, you can’t send messages. All you can do is send a push notification bearing a two-letter greeting: “Yo.”

Yes, it is stupid in the same way Flappy Bird was stupid. Yo looks like a prank. Using it feels like a prank. But, as more than one reputable publication has mentioned, Yo is not an elaborate hoax—though it was submitted to the App Store on April 1st. It is merely a goofy idea taken to its illogical extreme.

Read More>

Admittedly, I was skeptical.
There was this new iPhone app—a news app—called Watchup, and everybody seemed to like it before it really even existed. Backed by Microsoft Ventures, Stanford University, and the Knight Foundation, it had formed partnerships with media powerhouses such as the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, and Turner Broadcasting. It was a wunderkind app that had assumed some throne in the mobile media world before it even launched. The more organizations who jumped on the bandwagon, the less I wanted to as well.
But I tried Watchup after it launched for the iPhone yesterday. And I sort of get what all the fuss is about.
Continue Reading>

Admittedly, I was skeptical.

There was this new iPhone app—a news app—called Watchup, and everybody seemed to like it before it really even existed. Backed by Microsoft Ventures, Stanford University, and the Knight Foundation, it had formed partnerships with media powerhouses such as the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, and Turner Broadcasting. It was a wunderkind app that had assumed some throne in the mobile media world before it even launched. The more organizations who jumped on the bandwagon, the less I wanted to as well.

But I tried Watchup after it launched for the iPhone yesterday. And I sort of get what all the fuss is about.

Continue Reading>

If you enjoy being skeeved out by your coworkers, this is the dating app for you.
Everyone knows how well dating and networking mix, so of course an app that’s a mashup of LinkedIn and Tinder is a perfect idea. Oh wait, you don’t want to swipe through potential employers, coworkers, previous bosses, and marketing gasbags to find your next great romance?
Read More>
[Image: Flickr user Bignosedk]

If you enjoy being skeeved out by your coworkers, this is the dating app for you.

Everyone knows how well dating and networking mix, so of course an app that’s a mashup of LinkedIn and Tinder is a perfect idea. Oh wait, you don’t want to swipe through potential employers, coworkers, previous bosses, and marketing gasbags to find your next great romance?

Read More>

[Image: Flickr user Bignosedk]

Are you ready for the “bathroom economy”? 
That’s what CEO Jamey Edwards wants to create with the Flushd app, which is based around about 100,000 bathroom listings from Foursquare. You can review and rate public bathrooms, make use of an “emergency locator button” to find the nearest john, and digest content curated for “in-stall” consumption. Read more>

Are you ready for the “bathroom economy”?

That’s what CEO Jamey Edwards wants to create with the Flushd app, which is based around about 100,000 bathroom listings from Foursquare. You can review and rate public bathrooms, make use of an “emergency locator button” to find the nearest john, and digest content curated for “in-stall” consumption. Read more>


"It’s not until I sit down with The Weather Channel’s principal scientist, Bruce Rose, that I get a peek at something with truly transformative potential. 
Forecast on Demand is a new technology that incorporates elements of nowcasting but is able to create a detailed forecast—at the request of a user—for more than 2 billion points around the globe. Rose demonstrates on a raw-looking website featuring a world map. As he clicks around various random locations, Forecast on Demand instantly generates real-time forecasts for that specific geographical point, using the freshest information available from its more than 75,000 data sources. This upends traditional forecasting, which relies on pregenerated predictions. 
If it works as intended, the technology could represent a paradigm shift for prediction techniques.”

The Weather Channel is facing a major migration to mobile devices, which are fast replacing TV as the primary source of weather information. Over the past year, according to analytics firm Distimo, the total number of weather apps for iPhone and Android doubled to nearly 10,000.
Can The Weather Channel keep up?

"It’s not until I sit down with The Weather Channel’s principal scientist, Bruce Rose, that I get a peek at something with truly transformative potential.

Forecast on Demand is a new technology that incorporates elements of nowcasting but is able to create a detailed forecast—at the request of a user—for more than 2 billion points around the globe. Rose demonstrates on a raw-looking website featuring a world map. As he clicks around various random locations, Forecast on Demand instantly generates real-time forecasts for that specific geographical point, using the freshest information available from its more than 75,000 data sources. This upends traditional forecasting, which relies on pregenerated predictions.

If it works as intended, the technology could represent a paradigm shift for prediction techniques.”

The Weather Channel is facing a major migration to mobile devices, which are fast replacing TV as the primary source of weather information. Over the past year, according to analytics firm Distimo, the total number of weather apps for iPhone and Android doubled to nearly 10,000.

Can The Weather Channel keep up?