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Fast Company’s Harry McCracken and Alice Truong will report live from Apple’s product launch in Cupertino, California at 1pm ET. Among the rumored announcements: the iPhone 6 (possibly in 4.7” and 5.5” sizes) and the wearable device which everybody has been calling the iWatch.

It all comes down to this. After months of scuttlebutt and speculation, Apple will hold a press event at De Anza College’s Flint Center in its hometown of Cupertino—the same venue where Apple unveiled the first Mac over thirty years ago.
As usual, the company isn’t saying what it will announce, but current wisdom suggests Apple will show off new iPhones in two sizes—4.7” and 5.5”—and something wearable. What that wearable something will be remains murky; it would be a mistake to assume that it will be a watch, let alone be called the iWatch.
Technology Editor Harry McCracken and staff writer Alice Truong will be in Cupertino to provide live blog coverage of the news at it breaks, alongside color commentary from some Fast Company colleagues in New York. 
Apple wants to be the hub for your health data, just the way it became the hub for your music, movies, and photos. But like the world before iTunes, it’s hard to imagine what our lives could be like with centralized health app data. To find out, we dug into Apple’s HealthKit framework and spoke to some top iOS developers. What we found could change the health care ecosystem even more than we expected. 
Here’s how Apple is about to upend another huge industry.

Apple wants to be the hub for your health data, just the way it became the hub for your music, movies, and photos. But like the world before iTunes, it’s hard to imagine what our lives could be like with centralized health app data. To find out, we dug into Apple’s HealthKit framework and spoke to some top iOS developers. What we found could change the health care ecosystem even more than we expected.

Here’s how Apple is about to upend another huge industry.

A Dutch designer imagines a better way to brand the Korean giant.
For 21 years, the Samsung name as served as the company logo, occasionally superimposed over a wobbly blue oval. It’s the kind of logo that’s fine on washing machines and televisions, but incredibly boring on something personal, like a smartphone. Never is this more apparent than when compared to the branding of Samsung’s arch-enemy in Cupertino, which is simply the silhouette of an apple.
Regardless, Samsung sells more smartphones and tablets than even Apple does. Doesn’t it deserve branding just as good?
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A Dutch designer imagines a better way to brand the Korean giant.

For 21 years, the Samsung name as served as the company logo, occasionally superimposed over a wobbly blue oval. It’s the kind of logo that’s fine on washing machines and televisions, but incredibly boring on something personal, like a smartphone. Never is this more apparent than when compared to the branding of Samsung’s arch-enemy in Cupertino, which is simply the silhouette of an apple.

Regardless, Samsung sells more smartphones and tablets than even Apple does. Doesn’t it deserve branding just as good?

Read More>

Long a holdout, Apple has joined Google, Facebook, Twitter, and other tech companies by releasing a diversity report of its own. And like the rest of them, the makeup at the Cupertino, California company is largely white and male.
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Long a holdout, Apple has joined Google, Facebook, Twitter, and other tech companies by releasing a diversity report of its own. And like the rest of them, the makeup at the Cupertino, California company is largely white and male.

Read More>