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The smartwatch will include at least 10 sensors, including ones that monitor fitness and health.
For a company known for its secrecy, a lot of details about Apple’s rumored smartwatch are leaking. The latest: The tech giant is planning to release multiple versions of its smartwatch with different screen sizes for a launch this fall.
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[Image: Flickr user Maria Morri]

The smartwatch will include at least 10 sensors, including ones that monitor fitness and health.

For a company known for its secrecy, a lot of details about Apple’s rumored smartwatch are leaking. The latest: The tech giant is planning to release multiple versions of its smartwatch with different screen sizes for a launch this fall.

Read More>

[Image: Flickr user Maria Morri]

What’s life really like designing for Apple? An alum shares what he learned during his seven years in Cupertino.
Apple is synonymous with upper echelon design, but very little is known about the company’s design process. Most of Apple’s own employees aren’t allowed inside Apple’s fabled design studios. So we’re left piecing together interviews, or outright speculating about how Apple does it and what it’s really like to be a designer at the company.
Enter Mark Kawano. Before founding Storehouse, Kawano was a senior designer at Apple for seven years, where he worked on Aperture and iPhoto. Later, Kawano became Apple’s User Experience Evangelist, guiding third-party app iOS developers to create software that felt right on Apple’s platforms. Kawano was with the company during a critical moment, as Apple released the iPhone and created the wide world of apps.
In an interview with Co.Design (fastcodesign), Kawano spoke frankly about his time at Apple—and especially wanted to address all the myths the industry has about the company and about its people.
Read More>

What’s life really like designing for Apple? An alum shares what he learned during his seven years in Cupertino.

Apple is synonymous with upper echelon design, but very little is known about the company’s design process. Most of Apple’s own employees aren’t allowed inside Apple’s fabled design studios. So we’re left piecing together interviews, or outright speculating about how Apple does it and what it’s really like to be a designer at the company.

Enter Mark Kawano. Before founding Storehouse, Kawano was a senior designer at Apple for seven years, where he worked on Aperture and iPhoto. Later, Kawano became Apple’s User Experience Evangelist, guiding third-party app iOS developers to create software that felt right on Apple’s platforms. Kawano was with the company during a critical moment, as Apple released the iPhone and created the wide world of apps.

In an interview with Co.Design (fastcodesign), Kawano spoke frankly about his time at Apple—and especially wanted to address all the myths the industry has about the company and about its people.

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USERS. DEVELOPERS. EVERYBODY. THE DESIGN OF APPLE’S NEW EXTENSIONS WILL CHANGE THE WAY WE ALL USE APPS.
Today, our apps are basically self-contained castles. Walled off from every other app, you have to open Google Maps to find restaurants in your area, then you have to open up Yelp to search its reviews, and then you have to load Safari to search what Kow Soy is because everybody on Yelp says you just have to order it.
But this method is inefficient. In response, Apple debuted a new feature that will appear in their new iPhone/iPad software, iOS 8. They’re called Extensions. And what they do is allow you to use apps within apps, without having to multitask your way back and forth.
This might sound like a small detail—another feature that won’t really change anything. I disagree. I believe that because Apple is so influential in the app space—developers tend to make apps for iOS first and Android second—Extensions will shape the way we use our phones and developers create our apps into the future. Namely, most of us will begin using just a few apps on our phones. Alpha Apps, if you will. And these apps will be designed to contain other apps.
Meanwhile, the Internet of Apps—an idea where we surf from app to app as lazily as browsing the web—will never come to be.
Read More>

USERS. DEVELOPERS. EVERYBODY. THE DESIGN OF APPLE’S NEW EXTENSIONS WILL CHANGE THE WAY WE ALL USE APPS.

Today, our apps are basically self-contained castles. Walled off from every other app, you have to open Google Maps to find restaurants in your area, then you have to open up Yelp to search its reviews, and then you have to load Safari to search what Kow Soy is because everybody on Yelp says you just have to order it.

But this method is inefficient. In response, Apple debuted a new feature that will appear in their new iPhone/iPad software, iOS 8. They’re called Extensions. And what they do is allow you to use apps within apps, without having to multitask your way back and forth.

This might sound like a small detail—another feature that won’t really change anything. I disagree. I believe that because Apple is so influential in the app space—developers tend to make apps for iOS first and Android second—Extensions will shape the way we use our phones and developers create our apps into the future. Namely, most of us will begin using just a few apps on our phones. Alpha Apps, if you will. And these apps will be designed to contain other apps.

Meanwhile, the Internet of Apps—an idea where we surf from app to app as lazily as browsing the web—will never come to be.

Read More>

We tore apart Apple’s 850-page iBook on its new, simpler programming language, to find out why Apple would introduce a new language—despite all the headaches it will cause.
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We tore apart Apple’s 850-page iBook on its new, simpler programming language, to find out why Apple would introduce a new language—despite all the headaches it will cause.

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How does Yosemite stack up with Mavericks?
Yesterday, on stage at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference conference in San Francisco, Apple’s Senior Vice President of Software Engineering Craig Federighi unveiled the latest iteration of the Apple desktop operating system, Yosemite. Yosemite continues Apple’s evolution toward marrying the functionality of the desktop operating system, OS X, and the company’s mobile operating system,iOS—but without actually merging the two into a single system. Here’s how Yosemite compares with its predecessor OS X Mavericks, released last summer.
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How does Yosemite stack up with Mavericks?

Yesterday, on stage at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference conference in San Francisco, Apple’s Senior Vice President of Software Engineering Craig Federighi unveiled the latest iteration of the Apple desktop operating system, Yosemite. Yosemite continues Apple’s evolution toward marrying the functionality of the desktop operating system, OS X, and the company’s mobile operating system,iOS—but without actually merging the two into a single system. Here’s how Yosemite compares with its predecessor OS X Mavericks, released last summer.

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REMEMBER, IT’S A CONFERENCE FOR CODERS. SO WE DECOMPILED TODAY’S NEWS.
At its annual World Wide Developer’s Conference today, Apple introduced significant upgrades to its desktop and mobile operating systems, moved into the connected health and smart home spaces, and introduced a new programming language that will speed up the your app experience.
The keynote is aimed primarily at programmers, and even the most consumer-friendly announcements today could leave many feeling downright bored. You can receive a phone call on your iPhone and answer it on your Mac, which becomes a speaker phone. There’s a cloud-based storage system similar to Dropbox or Box, and it will archive all of your photos. And several other small but useful changes that will come to your iPhone and desktop later this summer.
But for programmers today offered a bonanza. A new programming language, Swift, will let developers make apps faster and more powerful. Changes to the App Store, including a list of trending apps and video previews, fix that nagging discoverability problem. In all, the software developer kit (SDK) for iOS 8 offers more than 4,000 new APIs to play with, including HealthKit and HomeKit — which will speed the development of connected health and smart home apps.
Here’s a scannable look at what Apple announced.
Read More>

REMEMBER, IT’S A CONFERENCE FOR CODERS. SO WE DECOMPILED TODAY’S NEWS.

At its annual World Wide Developer’s Conference today, Apple introduced significant upgrades to its desktop and mobile operating systems, moved into the connected health and smart home spaces, and introduced a new programming language that will speed up the your app experience.

The keynote is aimed primarily at programmers, and even the most consumer-friendly announcements today could leave many feeling downright bored. You can receive a phone call on your iPhone and answer it on your Mac, which becomes a speaker phone. There’s a cloud-based storage system similar to Dropbox or Box, and it will archive all of your photos. And several other small but useful changes that will come to your iPhone and desktop later this summer.

But for programmers today offered a bonanza. A new programming language, Swift, will let developers make apps faster and more powerful. Changes to the App Store, including a list of trending apps and video previews, fix that nagging discoverability problem. In all, the software developer kit (SDK) for iOS 8 offers more than 4,000 new APIs to play with, including HealthKit and HomeKit — which will speed the development of connected health and smart home apps.

Here’s a scannable look at what Apple announced.

Read More>

Ever since Tim Cook took over at Apple, analysts have been calling for the Next Big Thing, a category redefining product like the iPhone or iPad. Today onstage at the Worldwide Developer Conference, Apple unveiled new software for iOS 8 that gives us some rather prescient breadcrumbs concerning where the Tim Cook era is headed.
Read More>

Ever since Tim Cook took over at Apple, analysts have been calling for the Next Big Thing, a category redefining product like the iPhone or iPad. Today onstage at the Worldwide Developer Conference, Apple unveiled new software for iOS 8 that gives us some rather prescient breadcrumbs concerning where the Tim Cook era is headed.

Read More>

Another needless-to-say-takeaway from WWDC: developers are damn smart. I feel like I’m in my college astronomy class all over again right now.

Fast Company’s Austin Carr

iOS 8 will be available as a beta today. Complete version coming in the fall.

If you missed any of our liveblog coverage of today’s Apple Worldwide Developers Conference, you can read the transcript here

Craig Federighi rejects a phone call from his mom on his Mac during his demo. Instead, Federighi calls Dr. Dre on his Mac. "What time should I show up at work?" (around 9 a.m.)

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