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A Kuwaiti national uses fake names and sells other people’s copyrighted stories in the Kindle Store, shedding light on black hat hacker forums—and the theft, taboo sex, and swindles festering in the recesses of Amazon. Just another day in the world of self-publishing.

Unmasking A Digital Pirate On Amazon

A Kuwaiti national uses fake names and sells other people’s copyrighted stories in the Kindle Store, shedding light on black hat hacker forums—and the theft, taboo sex, and swindles festering in the recesses of Amazon. Just another day in the world of self-publishing.

Unmasking A Digital Pirate On Amazon

Amazon’s Plagiarism Problem
Amazon’s erotica section isn’t just rife with tales of lust, incest, violence, and straight-up kink. It’s also a hotbed of masked merchants profiting from copyright infringement. And even with anti-piracy legislation looming, Amazon doesn’t appear too eager to stop the forbidden author-on-author action.
Read on ->

Amazon’s Plagiarism Problem

Amazon’s erotica section isn’t just rife with tales of lust, incest, violence, and straight-up kink. It’s also a hotbed of masked merchants profiting from copyright infringement. And even with anti-piracy legislation looming, Amazon doesn’t appear too eager to stop the forbidden author-on-author action.

Read on ->

Why Google Music Targets Social And The Cloud

Google launched its long-overdue music store today, roughly eight years into the reign of Apple’s iTunes Store, which just sold its 16 billionth song. Clearly Google has a lot of catching up to do—and that’s just with Apple. Amazon has had a digital music store since 2007 that’s known for its aggressive pricing, while Facebook recently integrated third-party streaming services such as Spotify, Rhapsody, Rdio, and MOG.

Why has Google entered such a saturated market?

Check out interview highlights with Farhad Manjoo on toady’s NPR Fresh Air where they talk about the great tech war or 2012.

In the old days, Amazon sold books, Google was a search engine, Facebook was a social network and Apple sold computers.

But that’s not the case anymore.

Google and Apple now sell phones. Amazon has gotten into the server business. Apple sells music. Facebook and Amazon provide online payment services. And that’s just the beginning.


Today, Amazon announced a new feature for its Kindle e-reader called  Library Lending, which will enable users to borrow e-books from more  than 11,000 libraries in the US. The feature will launch later this  year, and be available for all Kindle generations.
For Kindle users, this will open a trove of free e-books to borrow  on-the-go. For publishing as a whole, it marks yet another sign that in  an industry of paper and hardcovers—even those stored in the basements  of old, dusty institutions like libraries—the transition to the digital  age is all but inevitable. How are libraries going to cope with this  transition?



(Picture via bookshelfporn, peopleasplaces, Papervision3D Panorama)

Today, Amazon announced a new feature for its Kindle e-reader called Library Lending, which will enable users to borrow e-books from more than 11,000 libraries in the US. The feature will launch later this year, and be available for all Kindle generations.

For Kindle users, this will open a trove of free e-books to borrow on-the-go. For publishing as a whole, it marks yet another sign that in an industry of paper and hardcovers—even those stored in the basements of old, dusty institutions like libraries—the transition to the digital age is all but inevitable. How are libraries going to cope with this transition?

(Picture via bookshelfporn, peopleasplaces, Papervision3D Panorama)

Here’s a new item to start your day off right: energy corporation Chevron just got slapped with an $8 billion fine for polluting the Amazon between 1972 and 1992. Progressives of the world, unite!


The 18 year-old lawsuit, brought on by 30,000 Ecuadorians, charged Chevron with destroying parts of the rainforest, increasing cancer rates among locals, destroying crops, and killing animals. Originally filed in New York, the case was moved to Ecuador after Chevron lobbied to have it heard in the country where the pollution supposedly occurred. And while the case slogged through the courts, Chevron continued to deny any wrongdoing, even setting up a website to plead its innocence.
According to the company, it already cleaned up its mess. “The Ecuadorian court’s judgment is illegitimate and unenforceable,” Chevron noted in a statement. “It is the product of fraud and is contrary to the legitimate scientific evidence. Chevron will appeal this decision in Ecuador and intends to see that justice prevails.”
But here’s the thing. It doesn’t matter whether Chevron appeals—or even whether the appeal succeeds. This is already the the second largest judgment in an environmental damage case (first is BP’s Deepwater Horizon $20 billion settlement fund). And most importantly, it happened in Ecuador.



They will hem and haw, of course, but this is a big deal. Sometimes the law works out!

Here’s a new item to start your day off right: energy corporation Chevron just got slapped with an $8 billion fine for polluting the Amazon between 1972 and 1992. Progressives of the world, unite!

The 18 year-old lawsuit, brought on by 30,000 Ecuadorians, charged Chevron with destroying parts of the rainforest, increasing cancer rates among locals, destroying crops, and killing animals. Originally filed in New York, the case was moved to Ecuador after Chevron lobbied to have it heard in the country where the pollution supposedly occurred. And while the case slogged through the courts, Chevron continued to deny any wrongdoing, even setting up a website to plead its innocence.

According to the company, it already cleaned up its mess. “The Ecuadorian court’s judgment is illegitimate and unenforceable,” Chevron noted in a statement. “It is the product of fraud and is contrary to the legitimate scientific evidence. Chevron will appeal this decision in Ecuador and intends to see that justice prevails.”

But here’s the thing. It doesn’t matter whether Chevron appeals—or even whether the appeal succeeds. This is already the the second largest judgment in an environmental damage case (first is BP’s Deepwater Horizon $20 billion settlement fund). And most importantly, it happened in Ecuador.

They will hem and haw, of course, but this is a big deal. Sometimes the law works out!