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Advertising on porn sites works, just ask Eat24

"It makes perfect sense when you think about it. They enjoy a life without pants and are constantly working up a huge appetite. Eat24 and porn stars are a match made in sexy heaven!"

…the first unusually hot day of the year correlates with a surge in air conditioner sales in Chicago, but not in muggy Atlanta—there, people wait through an average of two hot days before heading to the appliance store. When the crafts retailer Michaels approached the Weather Channel about advertising on rainy days—when craft projects are popular—the Weather Channel found Michaels’ sales increased not on actual rainy days, but instead when an extended forecast predicted rain within the next three days.

The Weather Channel knows what you want to buy

Aaron Harris of Tutorspree did the math, and it turns out that on a 13-inch Macbook Air, a mere 13% of Google’s results page are dedicated to results when searching “auto mechanic.” Meaning more than twice that space is spent on ads—yielding almost four times the number of links.

Imagine that in any other context—maybe a TV show in which the commercials were the main attraction—and it’s beyond absurd.

"I was getting home late and just wanted to grab some easy pre-made food from the local supermarket. While there, I remembered that I needed a few things and navigated my way to the paper towel aisle, where I stood, transfixed, before 50 feet of options. I was tired and hungry and very suddenly annoyed. All I wanted was to be able to clean my face after eating and now I was confronted with 50 feet of choice. Screw the mustachioed Brawny man, the quicker picker upper, and the boldly named Mardi Gras.
In the midst of my existential meltdown, I left the store without buying anything.”
Studies show that too many choices intimidate consumers—can we make the purchasing process less painful?
[Paper Towel Mess: Jcjgphotography via Shutterstock]

"I was getting home late and just wanted to grab some easy pre-made food from the local supermarket. While there, I remembered that I needed a few things and navigated my way to the paper towel aisle, where I stood, transfixed, before 50 feet of options. I was tired and hungry and very suddenly annoyed. All I wanted was to be able to clean my face after eating and now I was confronted with 50 feet of choice. Screw the mustachioed Brawny man, the quicker picker upper, and the boldly named Mardi Gras.

In the midst of my existential meltdown, I left the store without buying anything.”

Studies show that too many choices intimidate consumers—can we make the purchasing process less painful?

[Paper Towel Mess: Jcjgphotography via Shutterstock]

A print ad that declares "I wish my son had cancer," has sparked debate about what is and what is not a suitable tone and sentiment in charity advertising.

The ad is for Harrison’s Fund—a charity set up by the parents of Harrison, a 6-year-old boy with the degenerative condition Duchenne muscular dystrophy, which is incurable, barely known outside medical circles, and receives little research funding. Here’s the full ad, and the rest of the story