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American Eagle lingerie brand Aerie has now used the backlash around Photoshop and fashion to create a new campaign dubbed “Real,” featuring all unretouched models. It’s the brand’s first campaign of this kind and Aerie’s senior director of marketing Dana Seguin says embracing a more realistic image of girls and women is not just a one-time thing but will now be an integral part of the brand’s overall strategy. What do you think of the campaign?

American Eagle lingerie brand Aerie has now used the backlash around Photoshop and fashion to create a new campaign dubbed “Real,” featuring all unretouched models. It’s the brand’s first campaign of this kind and Aerie’s senior director of marketing Dana Seguin says embracing a more realistic image of girls and women is not just a one-time thing but will now be an integral part of the brand’s overall strategy. What do you think of the campaign?

If You’re Going To Do Brand Integration, Make It This Funny

“We had a couple ideas last year that we were going to put fake brands into anyway, and the Cheez-It one ended up taking the place of one of those. We were really into the idea of the musical episode breaking out into song in the middle of a commercial because the basic premise that we were working with was ‘this is every part of a talk show made into a musical.’ So the opening monologue would be a musical, the banter between [co-host] Reggie [Watts] and I would be a musical, the interview would be a musical. Then that naturally lead us to, “We should have a brand-integrated commercial that’s also a musical.”

So it was definitely an idea that we had been laughing about, all the while knowing that Cheez-It was interested in doing something. It was an idea that we would have done anyway with a fake brand, and Cheez-It wisely took advantage of it and had us do a real brand—which, to me, works even better. And I think that’s a testament to it, that it’s a lot of people’s favorite part of that episode. It’s such a great song, and Casey Wilson gives such an amazing performance that, advertisement or not, people really love that part of the episode.”                                                                                   

I don’t know how influential Twitter really is. I don’t think any of us are sitting around going, ‘Boy, if we can get people to tweet more, the ratings are going to go up.’ 

Preston Beckman, Fox’s longtime scheduling chief who is now a strategic adviser to the network. He’s one of many senior TV executives who remain dubious—if not disdainful—of  Twitter.

Now, activity on Twitter will influence Nielsen’s TV ratings. Here, an inside look at Twitter’s TV-powered, profitable future.

"Good advertisements don’t try to distort the actual author of the message. Yes, we live in an age where Chipotle deliberately hacked its own Twitter account but this is just the means to an end. Those making advertisements will do all they can to entertain you or draw you into a story or idea, but the buildup is to a message that is unequivocally signed by the brand. That’s the association they’re paying millions of dollars to cement. These kinds of advertisements can be integrated natively into publishers’ websites, but they won’t look like their articles. They will look like something else.”

Advertising on porn sites works, just ask Eat24

"It makes perfect sense when you think about it. They enjoy a life without pants and are constantly working up a huge appetite. Eat24 and porn stars are a match made in sexy heaven!"

…the first unusually hot day of the year correlates with a surge in air conditioner sales in Chicago, but not in muggy Atlanta—there, people wait through an average of two hot days before heading to the appliance store. When the crafts retailer Michaels approached the Weather Channel about advertising on rainy days—when craft projects are popular—the Weather Channel found Michaels’ sales increased not on actual rainy days, but instead when an extended forecast predicted rain within the next three days.

The Weather Channel knows what you want to buy