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In this episode of Brand Evolution, we look at the evolution of one of America’s cornerstone brands, Coca-Cola. From its origins in an Atlanta pharmacy through the creation of the iconic bottle and the development of its classic advertising, we look at the pivotal moments in the history of one of the world’s most instantly recognizable, and valuable, brands.

Heisenberg salutes baseball, Gatorade salutes Jeter, Jonathan Glazer directs a brutal ancient sport, the NFL gets a new game face, and a sobering look at a Syrian schoolyard.
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Heisenberg salutes baseball, Gatorade salutes Jeter, Jonathan Glazer directs a brutal ancient sport, the NFL gets a new game face, and a sobering look at a Syrian schoolyard.

Watch>

The downward spiral of illiteracy, Led Zeppelin and Peter Dinklage in space, a Grand Slam workout, an Instagram coupon, and tractor gymkhana.
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The downward spiral of illiteracy, Led Zeppelin and Peter Dinklage in space, a Grand Slam workout, an Instagram coupon, and tractor gymkhana.

Watch>

Ricky Gervais is a Netflix superfan, Matthew Dear makes machine music with GE, a Bissell brand manager eats off the subway floor, anti-litter ads made from garbage, and cats running a Pizza Hut.
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Ricky Gervais is a Netflix superfan, Matthew Dear makes machine music with GE, a Bissell brand manager eats off the subway floor, anti-litter ads made from garbage, and cats running a Pizza Hut.

Watch>

As the latest marketable, targetable demographic, they’re easy to stereotype. But that doesn’t mean they should be.
If you’re like me, you’ve probably consumed more than your fair share of media reports, research, and write-ups aimed at deciphering the millennial mindset.
As marketers and advertisers, we may once again be guilty of overanalyzing the heck out of any and all available data points, the goal being to put everything into neat buckets for our paying clients and prospects.
In our industry, so many thoughtful insights have been published that it’s reasonable to think we’re dangerously close to, once and for all, cracking the code on this elusive species, right? Maybe not.
Recently, ad agency Pinta commissioned a research team of graduate business school students—all millennials—from Florida International University to do some cultural detective work, scour through third-party research on the popular segment, and conduct some of their own proprietary research.
Here’s what they found>

As the latest marketable, targetable demographic, they’re easy to stereotype. But that doesn’t mean they should be.

If you’re like me, you’ve probably consumed more than your fair share of media reports, research, and write-ups aimed at deciphering the millennial mindset.

As marketers and advertisers, we may once again be guilty of overanalyzing the heck out of any and all available data points, the goal being to put everything into neat buckets for our paying clients and prospects.

In our industry, so many thoughtful insights have been published that it’s reasonable to think we’re dangerously close to, once and for all, cracking the code on this elusive species, right? Maybe not.

Recently, ad agency Pinta commissioned a research team of graduate business school students—all millennials—from Florida International University to do some cultural detective work, scour through third-party research on the popular segment, and conduct some of their own proprietary research.

Here’s what they found>

The self-destructing photo app is experimenting with pushing TV and movie clips.
When Snapchat turned down a $3 billion buyout offer from Facebook, critics thought it was foolhardy hubris. How could a messaging platform that makes photos and videos disintegrate after a few seconds possibly be worth anything to advertisers?
Now we have our first indication of how Snapchat plans to make its billions, and—surprise!—it might not be so silly after all. 
Read More>

The self-destructing photo app is experimenting with pushing TV and movie clips.

When Snapchat turned down a $3 billion buyout offer from Facebook, critics thought it was foolhardy hubris. How could a messaging platform that makes photos and videos disintegrate after a few seconds possibly be worth anything to advertisers?

Now we have our first indication of how Snapchat plans to make its billions, and—surprise!—it might not be so silly after all. 

Read More>