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“Take it up with the National Institutes of Health,” Bill O’Reilly snapped.

“I am a council member on the National Institutes of Health. Your number is wrong.” - Columbia University neuroscientist Carl Hart.

A Neuroscientist’s Quest To Debunk Harmful Misconceptions About Addiction

Columbia neuroscientist Carl Hart untangles the reasons researchers have gotten so much wrong about addiction—and how it’s fueled our obsession with the war on drugs. 

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I got plugged into the fact that if I focus my efforts on helping other people get sober, then I can stay sober—and that’s why giving people a second chance is so important to me.

Today, Michael Dadashi is the CEO of MHD Enterprises, a multi-million dollar e-waste recycling company based in Austin. But five years ago he was a heroin addict who couldn’t keep a job and nearly lost his life to an overdose—and that was his turning point.

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Read: This Fast-Growing Company Is Giving Former Addicts And Alcoholics A Second Chance

More than ever, this Internet of things reflects the way technology is working to make our lives easier, safer, and more enjoyable. But is it really? In some ways, yes: Electronic devices tell us how to reverse our cars, Siri is there to help with questions big and small, and Google intuits what we are really looking for when we’re not quite sure of the spelling.
What’s not to love? I certainly did love it all, until it started going wrong, and it had nothing to do with that Israeli security firm. When I finally got my car started that day, see, I promptly reversed into the wall of the car park. My brain was in automatic mode and my own car was too old to have warning beeps. The very next day I lost the bag that had my phone in it at the airport. When I wanted to call a good friend for some moral support, I had forgotten his phone number. I was frazzled—in part because up until then I was rather unaware of how dependent I’d become on this network of stuff.
How I Busted Out Of My Addictive Technology Loop

More than ever, this Internet of things reflects the way technology is working to make our lives easier, safer, and more enjoyable. But is it really? In some ways, yes: Electronic devices tell us how to reverse our cars, Siri is there to help with questions big and small, and Google intuits what we are really looking for when we’re not quite sure of the spelling.

What’s not to love? I certainly did love it all, until it started going wrong, and it had nothing to do with that Israeli security firm. When I finally got my car started that day, see, I promptly reversed into the wall of the car park. My brain was in automatic mode and my own car was too old to have warning beeps. The very next day I lost the bag that had my phone in it at the airport. When I wanted to call a good friend for some moral support, I had forgotten his phone number. I was frazzled—in part because up until then I was rather unaware of how dependent I’d become on this network of stuff.

How I Busted Out Of My Addictive Technology Loop