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The news that former Xbox chief Don Mattrick was leaving Microsoft to help revive the social gaming company Zynga has people wondering if Steven Spielberg will stick with Microsoft’s planned TV series based on the video game Halo.
The Halo series will, of course, proceed without Mattrick, but given that Mattrick’s close relationship with Spielberg was key in signing the deal, one has to wonder whether new snags might arise now that he’s gone. 
[Image courtesy of 343 Industries]

The news that former Xbox chief Don Mattrick was leaving Microsoft to help revive the social gaming company Zynga has people wondering if Steven Spielberg will stick with Microsoft’s planned TV series based on the video game Halo.

The Halo series will, of course, proceed without Mattrick, but given that Mattrick’s close relationship with Spielberg was key in signing the deal, one has to wonder whether new snags might arise now that he’s gone. 

[Image courtesy of 343 Industries]

Who is Don Mattrick, the guy who’s leaving Microsoft to join Zynga as CEO? Here, a few things you might want to know about him: 
He is currently president of the company’s Interactive Entertainment unit 
He was formerly at EA, where he was the force behind The Sims
He discovered a motion-control technology that had been kicking around the company but going nowhere. When Kinect launched in the fall of 2010, it became the fastest-selling consumer-electronics gadget of all time
He was the force behind the new Xbox One
He wears rainbow-stripe Paul Smith socks and once hired Cirque du Soleil to kick off a Microsoft event
His house is 25,000 square feet and is the largest in British Columbia
He has a 10-car garage
He’s worth $27 million
Here’s what else we know about Don Mattrick

Who is Don Mattrick, the guy who’s leaving Microsoft to join Zynga as CEO? Here, a few things you might want to know about him: 

  • He is currently president of the company’s Interactive Entertainment unit 
  • He was formerly at EA, where he was the force behind The Sims
  • He discovered a motion-control technology that had been kicking around the company but going nowhere. When Kinect launched in the fall of 2010, it became the fastest-selling consumer-electronics gadget of all time
  • He was the force behind the new Xbox One
  • He wears rainbow-stripe Paul Smith socks and once hired Cirque du Soleil to kick off a Microsoft event
  • His house is 25,000 square feet and is the largest in British Columbia
  • He has a 10-car garage
  • He’s worth $27 million

Here’s what else we know about Don Mattrick

Don Mattrick is leaving Microsoft for Zynga. Mattrick’s latest creation, Xbox One, offers a personalized program screen, as well as the ability to let users Skype with friends while watching TV and get live stats from their fantasy football team during NFL broadcasts. Users can switch seamlessly between gaming and web surfing, and in perhaps the purest expression of this marriage of gaming, tech, and entertainment pop, Mattrick’s pal Spielberg has signed on to produce a TV series based on the Halo video-game franchise, exclusively for the Xbox One.

When he was a teenager growing up in a suburb outside of Vancouver, he was turned down for a job at retail PC chain ComputerLand. So he started showing up at the store, working for, learning about software, and studying what clicked with shoppers. “It was really interesting to watch people walk by and see what they wanted and actually touched,” Mattrick says.

Meet Former Xbox Boss Don Mattrick, Who Just Left Microsoft To Turn Around Zynga
Mark Pincus’s Clowns Are Still Haunting Zynga


Around this week last year, more than a half-dozen clowns invaded Zynga headquarters in San Francisco, and began terrorizing some of its employees. This wasn’t research for some carnival game the company was working on; no, a herd of clowns—in full makeup, red- and green-haired, the ones who haunt children’s dreams—had swarmed the social-game developer’s offices, and, by some accounts, made employee lives miserable, for days on end.

"He means well, but just doesn’t realize the downstream effects of his decisions."
Another former developer lead agrees with the assessment. “It’s almost a mechanistic thing like, ‘Morale is low, so let’s do something that makes people happy.’ 
It was very typical of Zynga to address the symptoms rather than the root causes.”


Here are some of the managerial lessons learned from that episode.
[Illustrations by Joel Arbaje]

Mark Pincus’s Clowns Are Still Haunting Zynga

Around this week last year, more than a half-dozen clowns invaded Zynga headquarters in San Francisco, and began terrorizing some of its employees. This wasn’t research for some carnival game the company was working on; no, a herd of clowns—in full makeup, red- and green-haired, the ones who haunt children’s dreams—had swarmed the social-game developer’s offices, and, by some accounts, made employee lives miserable, for days on end.

"He means well, but just doesn’t realize the downstream effects of his decisions."

Another former developer lead agrees with the assessment. “It’s almost a mechanistic thing like, ‘Morale is low, so let’s do something that makes people happy.’

It was very typical of Zynga to address the symptoms rather than the root causes.”

Here are some of the managerial lessons learned from that episode.

[Illustrations by Joel Arbaje]

Zynga, a publicly traded company, is trying to prove it spent hundreds of millions of dollars on more than just a blank piece of paper and a few digital crayons. Yesterday, the company’s advertising platform for Draw Something was unveiled for the first time—and, if not handled with some finesse, it’s a great potential example of forced brand interaction.
Advertisers now have the option to purchase drawing terms related to their brands. When a user opens Draw Something, the game gives three options to choose from—say, tennis, pancake, or snowball—which players then doodle for a friend, who in turn has to guess what that user has drawn. Soon, however, users will start to see brands among the fun options typically available—imagine trying to draw Hewlett-Packard or Toyota—which could quickly turn the game into a mobile version of Brand Tags. The NHL is one of the earliest advertisers on the platform, hoping to promote the Stanley Cup playoffs. But not all brands are as player-friendly as the hockey league.
Read more->

Zynga, a publicly traded company, is trying to prove it spent hundreds of millions of dollars on more than just a blank piece of paper and a few digital crayons. Yesterday, the company’s advertising platform for Draw Something was unveiled for the first time—and, if not handled with some finesse, it’s a great potential example of forced brand interaction.

Advertisers now have the option to purchase drawing terms related to their brands. When a user opens Draw Something, the game gives three options to choose from—say, tennis, pancake, or snowball—which players then doodle for a friend, who in turn has to guess what that user has drawn. Soon, however, users will start to see brands among the fun options typically available—imagine trying to draw Hewlett-Packard or Toyota—which could quickly turn the game into a mobile version of Brand Tags. The NHL is one of the earliest advertisers on the platform, hoping to promote the Stanley Cup playoffs. But not all brands are as player-friendly as the hockey league.

Read more->

Photo Issue 2011: Mark Pincus, Zynga’s founder and CEO, leads visitors through the San Francisco company’s colorful, dog-friendly Potrero Hill headquarters at a brisk trot, showing off the huddles of engineers and designers who self-assemble into the “studios” that run Zynga’s insanely popular online games. "Most Innovative Companies: Zynga"  (March 2011) Photo By: Art Streiber

Photo Issue 2011: Mark Pincus, Zynga’s founder and CEO, leads visitors through the San Francisco company’s colorful, dog-friendly Potrero Hill headquarters at a brisk trot, showing off the huddles of engineers and designers who self-assemble into the “studios” that run Zynga’s insanely popular online games.

"Most Innovative Companies: Zynga"
(March 2011)

Photo By: Art Streiber

WeTopia: What Would Happen If Zynga Made Games For Good?
Instead of spending money to buy a fake online cow, players of WeTopia advance by buying a real cow for real farmers in the developing world.

WeTopia: What Would Happen If Zynga Made Games For Good?

Instead of spending money to buy a fake online cow, players of WeTopia advance by buying a real cow for real farmers in the developing world.

Inside Zynga, our #9 Most Innovative Company.


Pincus and Zynga’s aggressive embrace of lightweight and addictive social gaming has turned the company into a leviathan of fun, attracting 300 million people a month to play its titles. Known as “casual games,” they are colorful alternate universes in which people, and their friends, raise avatar families in FrontierVille and crops in FarmVille. Those users spend real money to buy virtual goods to fill their imaginary places, stuffing the company’s real-world coffers to the tune of an estimated $500 million in 2010. In late December, one month after it debuted, City-Ville (thinkSimCity with a Garanimals vibe) became Zynga’s most popular game, with 84.2 million active monthly users, according to market analyst AppData. It is the fastest-growing app and social game on Facebook. Moreover, it is the fastest-growing game in history.
It is also a validation of Pincus’s exceptional entrepreneurial vision, one that few people saw coming. In 2006, when he and his cofounders developed the concept for an asynchronous online game you could play with your real-world friends, the idea was exotic and untested. And the distribution plan — hitch a ride on the backs of the still-evolving Facebook and MySpace — seemed equally risky. “Mark went up and down Sand Hill Road and didn’t get the deal he wanted,” recalls Fred Wilson, the New York — based venture capitalist who has invested in and with Pincus since 1995, including an early-stage stake in Zynga. “He said, ‘They all tell me that I have no expertise in gaming.’ “



You’re the best! Around! Nothing’s gonna keep you down!

Inside Zynga, our #9 Most Innovative Company.

Pincus and Zynga’s aggressive embrace of lightweight and addictive social gaming has turned the company into a leviathan of fun, attracting 300 million people a month to play its titles. Known as “casual games,” they are colorful alternate universes in which people, and their friends, raise avatar families in FrontierVille and crops in FarmVille. Those users spend real money to buy virtual goods to fill their imaginary places, stuffing the company’s real-world coffers to the tune of an estimated $500 million in 2010. In late December, one month after it debuted, City-Ville (thinkSimCity with a Garanimals vibe) became Zynga’s most popular game, with 84.2 million active monthly users, according to market analyst AppData. It is the fastest-growing app and social game on Facebook. Moreover, it is the fastest-growing game in history.

It is also a validation of Pincus’s exceptional entrepreneurial vision, one that few people saw coming. In 2006, when he and his cofounders developed the concept for an asynchronous online game you could play with your real-world friends, the idea was exotic and untested. And the distribution plan — hitch a ride on the backs of the still-evolving Facebook and MySpace — seemed equally risky. “Mark went up and down Sand Hill Road and didn’t get the deal he wanted,” recalls Fred Wilson, the New York — based venture capitalist who has invested in and with Pincus since 1995, including an early-stage stake in Zynga. “He said, ‘They all tell me that I have no expertise in gaming.’ “

You’re the best! Around! Nothing’s gonna keep you down!