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Sorry, Not Sorry—Why Women Need To Stop Apologizing For Everything

Apologizing unnecessarily puts women in a subservient position and makes people lose respect for them, says executive coach and radio host Bonnie Marcus. Sylvia Ann Hewlett, founder of the Manhattan-based think tank, Center for Talent Innovation and author of Executive Presence: The Missing Link Between Talent and Success, says using “sorry” frequently undermines our gravitas and makes them appear unfit for leadership.

It’s not like women don’t know it’s a bad habit. So, why do they do it?

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There are plenty more studies to be found extolling the stress-busting and productivity benefits of carting your four-legged friends into the workplace. And adopting a pet policy might just be the best way to attract the kind of talent your company needs, and it may improve your current employees’ productivity as well.
But just how do you set up an inclusive pet policy that will work for everyone in your organization?
Here are some tips on how to work alongside Fido and attract top talent, all without ruffling any feathers:
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There are plenty more studies to be found extolling the stress-busting and productivity benefits of carting your four-legged friends into the workplace. And adopting a pet policy might just be the best way to attract the kind of talent your company needs, and it may improve your current employees’ productivity as well.

But just how do you set up an inclusive pet policy that will work for everyone in your organization?

Here are some tips on how to work alongside Fido and attract top talent, all without ruffling any feathers:

Read More>

Look deeper into seemingly shallow grievances to get to the root of workplace complaints.
"When we see someone else do something, we often assume they acted as they did, because of some factor about who they are. It is natural, then, when you hear someone complain to assume that is because they are whiny. You have to overcome that natural bias and look at the situation in which the complaint occurred. Take a little time to find out more about what is going on in their work environment." Read more> 

Look deeper into seemingly shallow grievances to get to the root of workplace complaints.

"When we see someone else do something, we often assume they acted as they did, because of some factor about who they are. It is natural, then, when you hear someone complain to assume that is because they are whiny. You have to overcome that natural bias and look at the situation in which the complaint occurred. Take a little time to find out more about what is going on in their work environment." Read more>