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When we’re left to our own pace to complete training, do we take advantage of the flexibility or fizzle out?
Employers and employees still value training. But the old gold standard—sequestering employees in classes for extended periods of time—is falling out of favor.
“We’re seeing a huge decrease in the amount of time people are spending in training rooms and classrooms,” says Janet Pogue, principal and global workplace leader at Gensler, a design firm that studies how people use office spaces (among other things). Instead, employers increasingly rely on modules that allow people to learn at their own pace, on their own schedules.
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When we’re left to our own pace to complete training, do we take advantage of the flexibility or fizzle out?

Employers and employees still value training. But the old gold standard—sequestering employees in classes for extended periods of time—is falling out of favor.

“We’re seeing a huge decrease in the amount of time people are spending in training rooms and classrooms,” says Janet Pogue, principal and global workplace leader at Gensler, a design firm that studies how people use office spaces (among other things). Instead, employers increasingly rely on modules that allow people to learn at their own pace, on their own schedules.

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To outsiders, Silicon Valley work culture seems almost like a joke: college kids pretending to be adults in unkempt hair who show up to business meetings wearing wrinkled T-shirts with jeans. But for the people entrenched in it, what could be better?
Glassdoor on Friday released its first report on the companies with the best work culture and values, as determined by reviews and ratings by former and current employees. Not only does Twitter top the list, but tech made a strong showing overall, filling 11 of the 25 spots. Aside from the microblogging service, the list also includes Google at No. 3, Facebook at No. 5, and Apple at No. 15.
What is it that Twitter employees love about their workplace?
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To outsiders, Silicon Valley work culture seems almost like a joke: college kids pretending to be adults in unkempt hair who show up to business meetings wearing wrinkled T-shirts with jeans. But for the people entrenched in it, what could be better?

Glassdoor on Friday released its first report on the companies with the best work culture and values, as determined by reviews and ratings by former and current employees. Not only does Twitter top the list, but tech made a strong showing overall, filling 11 of the 25 spots. Aside from the microblogging service, the list also includes Google at No. 3, Facebook at No. 5, and Apple at No. 15.

What is it that Twitter employees love about their workplace?

When your boss isn’t in the office, it’s easy to let communication slip down the priorities list. Here’s how to stay in touch and on task.
The workplace today is much different from the workplace of 30, 20, and even 10 years ago. Open office designs, in-house baristas, and for many organizations bosses managing from across the country are now the norm. Between video conferencing, email, and instant messaging, physical proximity to the office is no longer a requirement. Companies are hiring based on talent and fit, not if someone can be in their chair 24/7. This change has led to entire teams being spread across time zones, states, and even countries. While it can be tricky to report to a remote manager, I’m here to tell you it’s possible.
I work for a non-profit in Washington, D.C., but my manager works from her home in southern California. I’ve been working with her remotely for over a year, and in that time have expanded the responsibilities of my role and received a salary increase. Here are the tips that have helped me succeed:
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When your boss isn’t in the office, it’s easy to let communication slip down the priorities list. Here’s how to stay in touch and on task.

The workplace today is much different from the workplace of 30, 20, and even 10 years ago. Open office designs, in-house baristas, and for many organizations bosses managing from across the country are now the norm. Between video conferencing, email, and instant messaging, physical proximity to the office is no longer a requirement. Companies are hiring based on talent and fit, not if someone can be in their chair 24/7. This change has led to entire teams being spread across time zones, states, and even countries. While it can be tricky to report to a remote manager, I’m here to tell you it’s possible.

I work for a non-profit in Washington, D.C., but my manager works from her home in southern California. I’ve been working with her remotely for over a year, and in that time have expanded the responsibilities of my role and received a salary increase. Here are the tips that have helped me succeed:

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From a zen garden to a pet rabbit, at first, no silly luxury was spared for a co-working space set up by two Dutch designers. But soon, things started suspiciously changing, until the office was something out of 1984.
“After a while it became clear something strange was happening.”

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From a zen garden to a pet rabbit, at first, no silly luxury was spared for a co-working space set up by two Dutch designers. But soon, things started suspiciously changing, until the office was something out of 1984.

“After a while it became clear something strange was happening.”

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Don’t let them get you down. A guide to the kinds of people you’re forced to work with, and how to deal with them.
If you’re like most people, you like most of your colleagues most of the time. Generally speaking, the workplace is a community. People are friendly, and there is a shared goal. And that makes work a fulfilling place to be, and hopefully you feel as though you are part of something bigger.
Unfortunately, all that goodwill generated by your wonderful coworkers can evaporate completely when a few jerks appear. Just a couple of negative interactions with a colleague can be enough to overcome a host of other positive conversations. And those negative interactions may stay with you even after you leave work.
Here’s a field guide to some of the biggest jerks at work and a few things you can do to keep up your positive mood.
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Don’t let them get you down. A guide to the kinds of people you’re forced to work with, and how to deal with them.

If you’re like most people, you like most of your colleagues most of the time. Generally speaking, the workplace is a community. People are friendly, and there is a shared goal. And that makes work a fulfilling place to be, and hopefully you feel as though you are part of something bigger.

Unfortunately, all that goodwill generated by your wonderful coworkers can evaporate completely when a few jerks appear. Just a couple of negative interactions with a colleague can be enough to overcome a host of other positive conversations. And those negative interactions may stay with you even after you leave work.

Here’s a field guide to some of the biggest jerks at work and a few things you can do to keep up your positive mood.

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Ignoring an in-office conflict won’t make it go away. Here’s how to get things back on track.
You’ve had an interaction with a coworker during which you felt hurt, angry, misunderstood, and wronged—clearly it was an upsetting and difficult situation.
As you regroup, you review what happened, what you heard and experienced. Replaying the conversation is painful and you begin to plan what you’d like to say as a follow-up. Of course the other person is taking stock and regrouping too, and he or she likely has a very different take on what happened.
Revisiting and repairing a difficult interaction in the workplace is a complex process. Here’s how to get started:
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Ignoring an in-office conflict won’t make it go away. Here’s how to get things back on track.

You’ve had an interaction with a coworker during which you felt hurt, angry, misunderstood, and wronged—clearly it was an upsetting and difficult situation.

As you regroup, you review what happened, what you heard and experienced. Replaying the conversation is painful and you begin to plan what you’d like to say as a follow-up. Of course the other person is taking stock and regrouping too, and he or she likely has a very different take on what happened.

Revisiting and repairing a difficult interaction in the workplace is a complex process. Here’s how to get started:

Read More>

How great would it be to swap Friday pizzas and free coffee for a life coach or fresh groceries? These companies do just that.
It seems like every company tries to tout their cool factor by playing up their ping-pong tables. But it’s not just the Googles of the world offering nice-to-haves like free snacks and workout rooms.
While a lot of employee perks over the years have focused on how to make life at work as easy and pleasant as possible—from free lunches to concierge services to in-house doctors and gyms—the best of the best are figuring out ways to integrate people’s personal lives into the mix, says China Gorman, CEO of Great Place to Work, a human resources consulting, research and training firm.
"Organizations are really starting to be more human in their relationship with employees," says Gorman. "We are seeing a focus on the full human experience, not just how you are at work."
Here are some ways we’re seeing companies get creative and personal about their perks:
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How great would it be to swap Friday pizzas and free coffee for a life coach or fresh groceries? These companies do just that.

It seems like every company tries to tout their cool factor by playing up their ping-pong tables. But it’s not just the Googles of the world offering nice-to-haves like free snacks and workout rooms.

While a lot of employee perks over the years have focused on how to make life at work as easy and pleasant as possible—from free lunches to concierge services to in-house doctors and gyms—the best of the best are figuring out ways to integrate people’s personal lives into the mix, says China Gorman, CEO of Great Place to Work, a human resources consulting, research and training firm.

"Organizations are really starting to be more human in their relationship with employees," says Gorman. "We are seeing a focus on the full human experience, not just how you are at work."

Here are some ways we’re seeing companies get creative and personal about their perks:

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These companies adapt to the needs of women, so employees aren’t required to lean in too far.
Jane Park, CEO of the Seattle-based cosmetics company Julep, is fired up about the recent Hobby Lobby ruling.
I can tell it’s on her mind because one minute we’re talking about the design of nail polish bottles and a second later, she shifts gears, taking us in an unexpectedly political direction. “Last month, the Supreme Court reaffirmed that companies are people but I really don’t think that’s true,” Park says, out of the blue. “A company is not one human being; if anything, it’s a mini-society. There are many ways that rules of a company impact our lives more than the rules of a government.”
Park has spent decades thinking about the policies that affect women’s lives—it was the focus on her public policy degree at Princeton and her law degree at Yale—and today, as a businesswoman, it remains one of her biggest concerns. “As a head of a company, I see a huge opportunity to create the kind of society we want,” she tells me.
Her timing is great—we’re in a moment when company heads such as Sophie Amoruso of the online retailer Nasty Gal are proving that strong female leadership can be good for both morale and the bottom line.
It’s been a little over a year since Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In hit bookstore shelves, sparking a nationwide discussion about gender in the workplace. While many praised the book, calling it an invaluable manual for women keen to assert themselves at work, critics argued that Sandberg was urging women to adapt to a broken system rather than demanding that corporate America adapt to women’s needs. The good news for Sandberg detractors is that business leaders across the country are busy building a feminist workplace that allows women to thrive in their careers without having to lean in too far.
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These companies adapt to the needs of women, so employees aren’t required to lean in too far.

Jane Park, CEO of the Seattle-based cosmetics company Julep, is fired up about the recent Hobby Lobby ruling.

I can tell it’s on her mind because one minute we’re talking about the design of nail polish bottles and a second later, she shifts gears, taking us in an unexpectedly political direction. “Last month, the Supreme Court reaffirmed that companies are people but I really don’t think that’s true,” Park says, out of the blue. “A company is not one human being; if anything, it’s a mini-society. There are many ways that rules of a company impact our lives more than the rules of a government.”

Park has spent decades thinking about the policies that affect women’s lives—it was the focus on her public policy degree at Princeton and her law degree at Yale—and today, as a businesswoman, it remains one of her biggest concerns. “As a head of a company, I see a huge opportunity to create the kind of society we want,” she tells me.

Her timing is great—we’re in a moment when company heads such as Sophie Amoruso of the online retailer Nasty Gal are proving that strong female leadership can be good for both morale and the bottom line.

It’s been a little over a year since Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In hit bookstore shelves, sparking a nationwide discussion about gender in the workplace. While many praised the book, calling it an invaluable manual for women keen to assert themselves at work, critics argued that Sandberg was urging women to adapt to a broken system rather than demanding that corporate America adapt to women’s needs. The good news for Sandberg detractors is that business leaders across the country are busy building a feminist workplace that allows women to thrive in their careers without having to lean in too far.

Read More>

First standing desks, then walking desks. Now this?
Productivity seekers intimidated by treadmill desks can now thank the Kickstarter gods for Cubii, an elliptical desk companion. Much like the fitness machine found at your local gym, Cubii is a low-impact way to feel like you’re doing exercise. And, unlike treadmill desks, which can cost upwards of $1,000 and barely fit in a cubicle, Cubii slides right under your desk and retails for $350.
It’s a pretty simple concept: To deter the effects of Sedentary Death Syndrome, just pedal. It comes with an app to track progress. (Of course it does.)
Cubii has received more than $80,000 in funding, exceeding its Kickstarter goal.
Let us count the ways this is absurd.
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First standing desks, then walking desks. Now this?

Productivity seekers intimidated by treadmill desks can now thank the Kickstarter gods for Cubii, an elliptical desk companion. Much like the fitness machine found at your local gym, Cubii is a low-impact way to feel like you’re doing exercise. And, unlike treadmill desks, which can cost upwards of $1,000 and barely fit in a cubicle, Cubii slides right under your desk and retails for $350.

It’s a pretty simple concept: To deter the effects of Sedentary Death Syndrome, just pedal. It comes with an app to track progress. (Of course it does.)

Cubii has received more than $80,000 in funding, exceeding its Kickstarter goal.

Let us count the ways this is absurd.

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