FastCompany Magazine

The official Tumblr of Fast Company.

Plan any event and chances are one in five of the people you invite will be late.
A study done at San Francisco State University found that about 20% of the U.S. population is chronically late—but it’s not because they don’t value others’ time. It’s more complicated than that, says lead researcher Diana DeLonzor.
“Repetitive lateness is more often related to personality characteristics such as anxiety or a penchant for thrill-seeking,” she says. “Some people are drawn to the adrenaline rush of that last-minute sprint to the finish line, while others receive an ego boost from over-scheduling and filling each moment with activity.”
In her book Never Be Late Again: 7 Cures for the Punctually Challenged, DeLonzor says our relationship with time often starts in childhood and becomes an ingrained habit.
“Looking back, you were probably late or early all of your life—it’s part physiological and part psychological,” she says. “Most chronically late people truly dislike being late, but it’s a surprisingly difficult habit to overcome. Telling a late person to be on time is a little like telling a dieter to simply stop eating so much.”
DeLonzor says the majority of people have a combination of late and punctual habits—usually on time, but with a frantic rush at the last minute—but we can all learn from those who are chronically punctual. DeLonzor shares four traits that always on time share:
Read More>

Plan any event and chances are one in five of the people you invite will be late.

A study done at San Francisco State University found that about 20% of the U.S. population is chronically late—but it’s not because they don’t value others’ time. It’s more complicated than that, says lead researcher Diana DeLonzor.

“Repetitive lateness is more often related to personality characteristics such as anxiety or a penchant for thrill-seeking,” she says. “Some people are drawn to the adrenaline rush of that last-minute sprint to the finish line, while others receive an ego boost from over-scheduling and filling each moment with activity.”

In her book Never Be Late Again: 7 Cures for the Punctually Challenged, DeLonzor says our relationship with time often starts in childhood and becomes an ingrained habit.

“Looking back, you were probably late or early all of your life—it’s part physiological and part psychological,” she says. “Most chronically late people truly dislike being late, but it’s a surprisingly difficult habit to overcome. Telling a late person to be on time is a little like telling a dieter to simply stop eating so much.”

DeLonzor says the majority of people have a combination of late and punctual habits—usually on time, but with a frantic rush at the last minute—but we can all learn from those who are chronically punctual. DeLonzor shares four traits that always on time share:

Read More>

No one wants their private emails or pictures out there for the world to see. Here’s how to make them more secure.
In light of some disconcerting news recently involving cyber creeps picking through our private accounts, this Friday we’re offering you a hack that will not only make your accounts a little more secure, but hopefully will put your minds somewhat at ease. Should we call this edition the no-hack hack?
One of the best ways to step up your online security is by activating two-step authentication on your private accounts. Both Google and iCloud make this process available, and although many begrudge the onus placed on customers to be proactive about their security, making this kind of security a default is still a thing of the future, so it’s up to us as consumers to take an active role in our privacy. Here’s how to get started:
Read More>

No one wants their private emails or pictures out there for the world to see. Here’s how to make them more secure.

In light of some disconcerting news recently involving cyber creeps picking through our private accounts, this Friday we’re offering you a hack that will not only make your accounts a little more secure, but hopefully will put your minds somewhat at ease. Should we call this edition the no-hack hack?

One of the best ways to step up your online security is by activating two-step authentication on your private accounts. Both Google and iCloud make this process available, and although many begrudge the onus placed on customers to be proactive about their security, making this kind of security a default is still a thing of the future, so it’s up to us as consumers to take an active role in our privacy. Here’s how to get started:

Read More>

Clearing your mind and living in the moment isn’t about putting productivity on hold. You can be more profitable with less brain clutter.
If you are like me, you probably find yourself multitasking more, yet feeling like it really isn’t benefiting you. As a society, we’re stressing out about more and accomplishing less, adversely impacting both our mindsets and our productivity.
Most of us think of this as the new normal, and we’ve gotten used to juggling more. The begrudging acceptance of this attitude prevents companies from taking actions needed to keep workers focused and productive.
A stretched-thin, stressed-out workplace is not the workplace of the future. It falls on business managers to change this culture and promote focus and compassion—a concept making the rounds in workplace circles known as “mindfulness.” This is the technique of tuning out the noise and focusing deliberately on what is important.
Studies have found that mindfulness at work can increase engagement, productivity, innovation, and measurable business results. Here are three tips to increasing your mindfulness so that you cross tasks off your list and stress about them less.
Read More>

Clearing your mind and living in the moment isn’t about putting productivity on hold. You can be more profitable with less brain clutter.

If you are like me, you probably find yourself multitasking more, yet feeling like it really isn’t benefiting you. As a society, we’re stressing out about more and accomplishing less, adversely impacting both our mindsets and our productivity.

Most of us think of this as the new normal, and we’ve gotten used to juggling more. The begrudging acceptance of this attitude prevents companies from taking actions needed to keep workers focused and productive.

A stretched-thin, stressed-out workplace is not the workplace of the future. It falls on business managers to change this culture and promote focus and compassion—a concept making the rounds in workplace circles known as “mindfulness.” This is the technique of tuning out the noise and focusing deliberately on what is important.

Studies have found that mindfulness at work can increase engagement, productivity, innovation, and measurable business results. Here are three tips to increasing your mindfulness so that you cross tasks off your list and stress about them less.

Read More>

Turn email into less of a chore with templates of responses and save hours every week.
In an age where the workday is seemingly getting longer and longer, every minute counts. So we thought we’d give you some of them back with this week’s productivity hack.
Read More>

Turn email into less of a chore with templates of responses and save hours every week.

In an age where the workday is seemingly getting longer and longer, every minute counts. So we thought we’d give you some of them back with this week’s productivity hack.

Read More>

If your motto is no new friends, it’s time to challenge yourself and get out of your comfort zone. The payoff will be worth it.
We all seem to gravitate toward our comfort zones from time to time, and one of the easiest ways to stay there is to spend time with people who are just like us.
These people agree with us, think like us, and have a similar viewpoint on issues. But while this may seem to make our lives easier, there is also a downside.
Only spending time with people like us prevents us from growing, and even though we may be less comfortable hanging around people who are different from us, doing so also helps us to expand in crucial areas.Here are five benefits of spending time with people who are different from us:
Read More>

If your motto is no new friends, it’s time to challenge yourself and get out of your comfort zone. The payoff will be worth it.

We all seem to gravitate toward our comfort zones from time to time, and one of the easiest ways to stay there is to spend time with people who are just like us.

These people agree with us, think like us, and have a similar viewpoint on issues. But while this may seem to make our lives easier, there is also a downside.

Only spending time with people like us prevents us from growing, and even though we may be less comfortable hanging around people who are different from us, doing so also helps us to expand in crucial areas.

Here are five benefits of spending time with people who are different from us:

Read More>

image

Wow people on the first impression with tricks as simple as including your middle initial in your signature, or throwing on a pair of glasses.

For more ways to look like a smarty-pants without cracking a book, check out the video above.

(Source: Fast Company)

If our willpower is indeed like a muscle as some scientists say, then these tricks may help you bulk up.
We are on a constant quest to get as much done as possible, but it’s time that we all become a little more realistic about what can and can’t be achieved through sheer willpower.
Repeat after me: My willpower is limited.
Columbia psychologist Heidi Grant Halvorson argues that our willpower is often not up to the task of resisting temptation. She offers, instead, that we use if-then planning to reduce our reliance on our willpower.
Rather than making a decision when the time comes, if-then planning allows you to plot out your defense ahead of time so that you’ve already made the right decision when the time comes.
Unfortunately, though, we can’t always plan for what’s ahead, which is when our willpower really needs to kick in.
Psychologist Roy F. Baumeister and science writer John Tierney, who wrote a book all about willpower, believe that willpower is like a muscle. It is something that we can build up through the right sustenance and exercise, and it is also something that can get worn out.
Here are some quick tips to boost your mental strength and fortitude:
Read More>

If our willpower is indeed like a muscle as some scientists say, then these tricks may help you bulk up.

We are on a constant quest to get as much done as possible, but it’s time that we all become a little more realistic about what can and can’t be achieved through sheer willpower.

Repeat after me: My willpower is limited.

Columbia psychologist Heidi Grant Halvorson argues that our willpower is often not up to the task of resisting temptation. She offers, instead, that we use if-then planning to reduce our reliance on our willpower.

Rather than making a decision when the time comes, if-then planning allows you to plot out your defense ahead of time so that you’ve already made the right decision when the time comes.

Unfortunately, though, we can’t always plan for what’s ahead, which is when our willpower really needs to kick in.

Psychologist Roy F. Baumeister and science writer John Tierney, who wrote a book all about willpower, believe that willpower is like a muscle. It is something that we can build up through the right sustenance and exercise, and it is also something that can get worn out.

Here are some quick tips to boost your mental strength and fortitude:

Read More>

Does your morning look like Margaret Thatcher’s, or Ben Franklin’s? These routines might inspire you to create your own.
Whether you’re a morning person or a night owl, we all start our day at some point. And we all seem to start it differently.
Some of us hop online to check social media, others dive in to email, still others eat breakfast, exercise, or pack lunches for the kids. There’re a million different ways a morning could go.
Which morning routine might be best?
While there’s probably not an ideal morning routine that fits everyone, we can learn a lot from the morning routines of successful people as well as from the research and inspiration behind starting a morning on the right foot.
I collected a wide range of opinions on how best to start a day, from the scientific to the successful. Here’s the best of what I found—maybe it’ll help you get a little more productivity, creativity, and enjoyment out of your morning.
Read More>

Does your morning look like Margaret Thatcher’s, or Ben Franklin’s? These routines might inspire you to create your own.

Whether you’re a morning person or a night owl, we all start our day at some point. And we all seem to start it differently.

Some of us hop online to check social media, others dive in to email, still others eat breakfast, exercise, or pack lunches for the kids. There’re a million different ways a morning could go.

Which morning routine might be best?

While there’s probably not an ideal morning routine that fits everyone, we can learn a lot from the morning routines of successful people as well as from the research and inspiration behind starting a morning on the right foot.

I collected a wide range of opinions on how best to start a day, from the scientific to the successful. Here’s the best of what I found—maybe it’ll help you get a little more productivity, creativity, and enjoyment out of your morning.

Read More>