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What traits do today’s prominent female leaders share? Let’s take a look:  
Effective role models: A recent CNN opinion piece about how to have more women like Sheryl Sandberg concludes that it is the prominence of such women that inspires others to be like them: “We can create more Sandbergs by surrounding ourselves with confident, outspoken women.” Sandberg herself actively works to encourage others by running a monthly salon with talks by inspirational women. The more role models we have across all industries, the more likely it is that the female leaders of the future will be inspired.
Mentoring—at all levels: If you can identify opportunities and encourage women early on then they will be able to fulfill their potential throughout their careers. Some of the most prominent women had great mentors—and they are often now working as mentors to the next generation themselves.

Confidence: Confidence can mean a world of difference between a woman who is able to live her dreams and one who is not—so often a talented woman is held back through lack of confidence. The former U.K. prime minister Margaret Thatcher was famous for her confidence and iron will—and for her slogan “The lady’s not for turning.” In an article for the MBA@UNC, media pioneer Arianna Huffington cites lack of confidence as “a killer to success for women. In order to advance their careers, women need to be comfortable seeing themselves as qualified leaders and risk takers.”

Keep reading: 7 shared traits that unite women in power

What traits do today’s prominent female leaders share? Let’s take a look:  

  • Effective role models: A recent CNN opinion piece about how to have more women like Sheryl Sandberg concludes that it is the prominence of such women that inspires others to be like them: “We can create more Sandbergs by surrounding ourselves with confident, outspoken women.” Sandberg herself actively works to encourage others by running a monthly salon with talks by inspirational women. The more role models we have across all industries, the more likely it is that the female leaders of the future will be inspired.

  • Mentoring—at all levels: If you can identify opportunities and encourage women early on then they will be able to fulfill their potential throughout their careers. Some of the most prominent women had great mentors—and they are often now working as mentors to the next generation themselves.

  • Confidence: Confidence can mean a world of difference between a woman who is able to live her dreams and one who is not—so often a talented woman is held back through lack of confidence. The former U.K. prime minister Margaret Thatcher was famous for her confidence and iron will—and for her slogan “The lady’s not for turning.” In an article for the MBA@UNC, media pioneer Arianna Huffington cites lack of confidence as “a killer to success for women. In order to advance their careers, women need to be comfortable seeing themselves as qualified leaders and risk takers.”


Keep reading: 
7 shared traits that unite women in power

"In my experience, what’s true as a woman is very different from some of the more cliched ways we’ve represented women over the years. I want to tell a more complex story. I want to tell a more empowered story, a more joyful story, a more sexy story … 
There’s an opportunity to create a new way of looking at women in the culture, and that’s by example.” -Connie Britton, No. 13 on our list of Most Creative People in business

"In my experience, what’s true as a woman is very different from some of the more cliched ways we’ve represented women over the years. I want to tell a more complex story. I want to tell a more empowered story, a more joyful story, a more sexy story … 

There’s an opportunity to create a new way of looking at women in the culture, and that’s by example.” -Connie Britton, No. 13 on our list of Most Creative People in business

What happens when a generation of women have the world and all its knowledge at their fingertips? They mobilize.
Check out our new Mobilizing series! 
Here’s the first story:
Mobilizing: A Generation Of Women With The World At Their Fingertips

Women rule mobile

With new tools, practices and freedoms—-unattached to any specific location—the women that are a part of the Mobilizing series are examples of what happens when a generation of women literally have the world and all its knowledge at their fingertips, in their pockets, and on their kitchen tables: they change the game. We’ll tell you how.
And, if you know a woman who is mobilizing (we’re sure you do), we would like to hear from you. Tell us about her and let’s talk about who’s mobilizing together. Let us know here.
[Image: Flickr user Garryknight]

What happens when a generation of women have the world and all its knowledge at their fingertips? They mobilize.

Check out our new Mobilizing series! 

Here’s the first story:

Mobilizing: A Generation Of Women With The World At Their Fingertips

Women rule mobile

With new tools, practices and freedoms—-unattached to any specific location—the women that are a part of the Mobilizing series are examples of what happens when a generation of women literally have the world and all its knowledge at their fingertips, in their pockets, and on their kitchen tables: they change the game. We’ll tell you how.

And, if you know a woman who is mobilizing (we’re sure you do), we would like to hear from you. Tell us about her and let’s talk about who’s mobilizing together. Let us know here.

[Image: Flickr user Garryknight]

Forensic Artist Proves That Women Literally Don’t Know Their Own Beauty

A new addition to Dove’s Real Beauty campaign asks a forensic artist to draw two sketches of women—one based on their own description, and one from a stranger—with shocking results.

Beauty is said to be in the eye of the beholder. Studies have shown, though that when the beauty in question is a woman’s own, and the beholder’s eye is theirs as well, only 4% of women around the world consider themselves beautiful. Dove has long been working toward shifting that paradigm with the alternately lauded and derided Real Beauty campaign. The brand’s latest effort at changing self-perception attempts to do so through eyewitness testimony.

Recently, Dove hired former police forensic artist Gil Zamora to illustrate some psychologically revealing sketches. In a campaign created by Ogilvy Toronto, a series of women described themselves to Zamora in minute detail, from behind a curtain. The artist in turn created composites as though trying to identify a criminal. Next, each participant was asked to describe another woman present. The results are dramatic and sort of moving.

Here’s the full story.

How Rejection Can Inspire Great Movements: The Story of Makers

Dyllan McGee wanted to make a documentary about Gloria Steinem. Steinem said no. That rejection launched Makers, a comprehensive video project documenting the entire women’s movement.

 

McGee wanted to make a film about the life of 1960s radical journalist and feminist icon Gloria Steinem. “Gloria very quickly said you can’t tell the story of the women’s movement through one person—which I took as a ‘no’,” McGee, founder and executive producer of MAKERS, told Fast Company, “So we went back to the drawing board.”

Read the full story here. 

Why do companies keep making offensive pink products “for her”?
The ePad Femme is just the latest in a long line of ill-conceived, insulting, “female-focused” products. Here, we look into the mystery of the unnecessary genderification of gender-neutral products.


In October, the Eurostar Group introduced a product called The ePad Femme—an eReader just for women. It sells for $190, and it comes preloaded with stereotypically feminine apps, which seem to revolve around fitness, cooking, and man-pleasing. It is, of course, pink. Eurostar Group is a Dubai-based company, and the tablet received little attention in the U.S. until the past week or two, when bloggers picked up an article in the Jerusalem Post about how Eurostar was marketing the tablet as a Valentine’s Day gift. Cue the understandable outrage at such a sexist product.
This opprobrium happens every time there’s a goofy product marketed as something “for women”: Check out the Bic Cristal Pen for Her, the Della computer for women, and Honda’s car for women for debacles similar to the ePad Femme kerfuffle. And even marketers who aren’t creating a bespoke product for women seem to cling to some jaw-droppingly retrograde notions about women’s behavior vis-à-vis their existing product and women’s lives in general—witness Samsung’s embarrassing Galaxy S4 event, which featured a group of drunk ladies preoccupied with weight loss and marrying doctors.
Since the public response to the pinkification of gender-neutral products seems, at face value, to be universally negative, we were wondering, why do companies keep making these things?
We asked Jonah Disend, CEO at the brand development firm Redscout, and Gina Reimann, director of industrial design at Redscout, to clue us in on why Eurostar might have created the ePad Femme.
Find out what she had to say here.

Why do companies keep making offensive pink products “for her”?

The ePad Femme is just the latest in a long line of ill-conceived, insulting, “female-focused” products. Here, we look into the mystery of the unnecessary genderification of gender-neutral products.

In October, the Eurostar Group introduced a product called The ePad Femme—an eReader just for women. It sells for $190, and it comes preloaded with stereotypically feminine apps, which seem to revolve around fitness, cooking, and man-pleasing. It is, of course, pink. Eurostar Group is a Dubai-based company, and the tablet received little attention in the U.S. until the past week or two, when bloggers picked up an article in the Jerusalem Post about how Eurostar was marketing the tablet as a Valentine’s Day gift. Cue the understandable outrage at such a sexist product.

This opprobrium happens every time there’s a goofy product marketed as something “for women”: Check out the Bic Cristal Pen for Her, the Della computer for women, and Honda’s car for women for debacles similar to the ePad Femme kerfuffle. And even marketers who aren’t creating a bespoke product for women seem to cling to some jaw-droppingly retrograde notions about women’s behavior vis-à-vis their existing product and women’s lives in general—witness Samsung’s embarrassing Galaxy S4 event, which featured a group of drunk ladies preoccupied with weight loss and marrying doctors.

Since the public response to the pinkification of gender-neutral products seems, at face value, to be universally negative, we were wondering, why do companies keep making these things?

We asked Jonah Disend, CEO at the brand development firm Redscout, and Gina Reimann, director of industrial design at Redscout, to clue us in on why Eurostar might have created the ePad Femme.

Find out what she had to say here.

Wriggly work: Byoearth empowers women to create income, increase crop production, and build their quality of life—with worms! 

Wriggly work: Byoearth empowers women to create income, increase crop production, and build their quality of life—with worms