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The sound of Wikipedia being updated is surprisingly relaxing.Listen to Wikipedia, inspired by Listen to Bitcoin and created by Mahmoud Hashemi and Stephen LaPorte, transforms the worldwide editing process into a relaxed global orchestra. A celesta plays whenever an addition is made. A clavichord sounds whenever something is deleted. The higher the pitch, the smaller the edit.

The sound of Wikipedia being updated is surprisingly relaxing.

Listen to Wikipedia, inspired by Listen to Bitcoin and created by Mahmoud Hashemi and Stephen LaPorte, transforms the worldwide editing process into a relaxed global orchestra. A celesta plays whenever an addition is made. A clavichord sounds whenever something is deleted. The higher the pitch, the smaller the edit.

I think one of the things that most 21-year-old people should do is to recognize now that you can make life choices which control your expenses, and that controlling your expenses is one of the most crucial steps toward the kind of financial independence that you need in order to follow your dreams in the future. Whether it is a change of job, or an entrepreneurial dream, the less you NEED to spend each month, the easier it is to follow those dreams.

Jimmy Wales, the founder of Wikipedia, would have told his younger self to save up.
Daily Fast Feed Roundup
It’s Friday! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 
From our NSA secret surveillance tracker: The U.S. Army has banned access to The Guardian's NSA Prism scandal coverage. 
The Justice Department is investigating former Pentagon general James ‘Hoss’ Cartwright for allegedly leaking info about a massive cyber attack on Iran’s nuclear facilities. 
Facebook is testing out a new chat room feature that would compete directly with Google Hangouts.  
The day after Instagram’s video feature launched, mentions of Vine on Twitter dropped by half a million. 
The New York Times just profiled Wikipedia’s ‘benevolent dictator,’ Jimmy Wales, ‘the world-famous Internet entrepreneur who didn’t become a billionaire.’
The U.K. government is the first to support three-person IVF, a practice in which babies are ‘made’ using three sets of DNA.
Lance Armstrong says he wouldn’t have won the Tour De France with out doping.”I didn’t invent doping, and it didn’t stop when I stopped. I simply participated in a system…”
The San Francisco-based accelerator Angelpad is going bi-coastal with a second head-quarters in NYC.
Samsung now sells $13,000 organic light emitting diode (OLED) TVs. Its rounded design supposedly allows users to view the screen from all angles without the viewing experience being affected.
Soon Time Warner Cable customers will be able use a new app to watch TV via their XBox 360.
The yet-to-be-seen Netflix show ‘Orange is the New Black’ has already been given the green light for a second season. Nobody’s even seen the first season yet.
Watch out Apple, Google is entering the gaming arena with a gaming console, a smart watch, and a new version of its Nexus Q streaming console. 
Have a great weekend! —M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

Daily Fast Feed Roundup

It’s Friday! Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know today: 

Have a great weekend! —M. Cecelia Bittner and Jessica Hullinger

fastcodesign:

Infographic: An Amazing, Invisible Truth About Wikipedia
Every Wikipedia entry has an optional feature we take for granted—geotagging. An entry on the Lincoln Memorial will be linked to its specific latitude and longitude in Washington D.C. On any individual post, this may or may not be a useful thing. But what about looking at these locations en masse?
That was a question asked by data viz specialist and programmer Olivier Beauchesne. To find out, he downloaded all of Wikipedia (it’s open-source, after all) then used an algorithm that would assemble 300 topical clusters from popular, related keywords. Then he placed the location of each article in these topical clusters on a map. What he found was astounding.
“Eventually, Beauchesne’s maps evolve to something more than the locations of everything in the world. They become the locations of, quite simply, everything we know.”

fastcodesign:

Infographic: An Amazing, Invisible Truth About Wikipedia

Every Wikipedia entry has an optional feature we take for granted—geotagging. An entry on the Lincoln Memorial will be linked to its specific latitude and longitude in Washington D.C. On any individual post, this may or may not be a useful thing. But what about looking at these locations en masse?

That was a question asked by data viz specialist and programmer Olivier Beauchesne. To find out, he downloaded all of Wikipedia (it’s open-source, after all) then used an algorithm that would assemble 300 topical clusters from popular, related keywords. Then he placed the location of each article in these topical clusters on a map. What he found was astounding.

“Eventually, Beauchesne’s maps evolve to something more than the locations of everything in the world. They become the locations of, quite simply, everything we know.”

(Source: fastcodesign)