FastCompany Magazine

The official Tumblr of Fast Company.

The Cronut Project was born when three advertising agency interns were given a $1,000 budget and the mandate to do as much good as possible. Taking a little bit of inspiration from Fast Company, they are soliciting donations for the Food Bank of New York with a delicious (and flaky) twist: They have partnered with Dominique Ansel, baker-creator of the smash hit pastry that combines the best of a croissant and a doughnut, to offer a limited edition passion fruit flavor. 
Every day this week, the largest-dollar donor, plus a random donor, will get one of these special cronuts.

The Cronut Project was born when three advertising agency interns were given a $1,000 budget and the mandate to do as much good as possible. Taking a little bit of inspiration from Fast Company, they are soliciting donations for the Food Bank of New York with a delicious (and flaky) twist: They have partnered with Dominique Ansel, baker-creator of the smash hit pastry that combines the best of a croissant and a doughnut, to offer a limited edition passion fruit flavor.

Every day this week, the largest-dollar donor, plus a random donor, will get one of these special cronuts.

Innovation expert Kaihan Krippendorff uses hip-hop star Drake’s path to achieving his goal of $25 million by the age of 25 to demonstrate his 30-minute strategy for reaching your goals.
1. After you are goneThis is an outcome you will not achieve in your lifetime but it is the reason you get up and push ahead every day.Drake Example: To make genre-cracking music that connects emotionally with his audience.
2. The endThis is a picture (or vision) of what you will achieve or what you will become in the long-term, usually 3 to 10 years from now. Define 1 to 3 metrics, and their values, that will tell you that you have achieved your long-term vision. Drake Example: To be known by Dec. 31, 2016, as one of the greatest musical artists in the world; to be indefinable, with music that crosses genres; to have multiple houses and a private jet.
3. The next chapter (12-18 months)What must you achieve in the next 12 to 18 months to know you are on the path and by what metrics will you judge that the plot is unfolding as you desire?Drake Example: To have released by Dec. 31, 2014, one of the biggest albums of the year.
4. Plot actions (12-18 months)What 3 to 5 actions (or strategic priorities) will you focus on continuously for the next 12 to 18 months to reach this chapter’s conclusion?Drake Example: Release best album yet; continue improving music and performance; launch successful tour.
5. The first scene (the next 3 months)What 1 to 5 key metrics will you focus on in the next three months (and who is responsible)?Drake Example: 15 songs recorded that he thinks are awesome; 120 total hours practiced.



[Drake Image: AP Images]

Innovation expert Kaihan Krippendorff uses hip-hop star Drake’s path to achieving his goal of $25 million by the age of 25 to demonstrate his 30-minute strategy for reaching your goals.

1. After you are gone
This is an outcome you will not achieve in your lifetime but it is the reason you get up and push ahead every day.
Drake Example: To make genre-cracking music that connects emotionally with his audience.

2. The end
This is a picture (or vision) of what you will achieve or what you will become in the long-term, usually 3 to 10 years from now. Define 1 to 3 metrics, and their values, that will tell you that you have achieved your long-term vision. 
Drake Example: To be known by Dec. 31, 2016, as one of the greatest musical artists in the world; to be indefinable, with music that crosses genres; to have multiple houses and a private jet.

3. The next chapter (12-18 months)
What must you achieve in the next 12 to 18 months to know you are on the path and by what metrics will you judge that the plot is unfolding as you desire?
Drake Example: To have released by Dec. 31, 2014, one of the biggest albums of the year.

4. Plot actions (12-18 months)
What 3 to 5 actions (or strategic priorities) will you focus on continuously for the next 12 to 18 months to reach this chapter’s conclusion?
Drake Example: Release best album yet; continue improving music and performance; launch successful tour.

5. The first scene (the next 3 months)
What 1 to 5 key metrics will you focus on in the next three months (and who is responsible)?
Drake Example: 15 songs recorded that he thinks are awesome; 120 total hours practiced.

[Drake Image: AP Images]


 ”I see the future but I live for the moment, make sense don’t it. Now make dollars, I mean billions. I’m a genius, I mean brilliant.”

—Pitbull, who is worth a mere $9.5 million.
This Businessweek infographic lays out the claimed vs. actual networth of rappers because apparently, when rappers rap about how much money they have, sometimes it’s slightly exaggerated. 
 

 ”I see the future but I live for the moment, make sense don’t it. Now make dollars, I mean billions. I’m a genius, I mean brilliant.

—Pitbull, who is worth a mere $9.5 million.

This Businessweek infographic lays out the claimed vs. actual networth of rappers because apparently, when rappers rap about how much money they have, sometimes it’s slightly exaggerated. 

 

CEOs earned 273 times the average worker in 2012—and that’s going up
According to the Economic Policy Institute, in 2012, average CEO compensation among the 350 largest U.S. public companies was $14.1 million (including income from options), which was a 12.7% increase on 2011, and 37.4% jump over 2009.
Some economists explain this higher-than-the-highest phenomenon by saying that CEOs’ jobs are becoming more difficult, and that they therefore should be paid better. But the EPI favors a different explanation: that CEOs hold the reins of their organizations and can win the compensation that suits them. 
[Image: Lildevil4ever]

CEOs earned 273 times the average worker in 2012—and that’s going up

According to the Economic Policy Institute, in 2012, average CEO compensation among the 350 largest U.S. public companies was $14.1 million (including income from options), which was a 12.7% increase on 2011, and 37.4% jump over 2009.

Some economists explain this higher-than-the-highest phenomenon by saying that CEOs’ jobs are becoming more difficult, and that they therefore should be paid better. But the EPI favors a different explanation: that CEOs hold the reins of their organizations and can win the compensation that suits them. 

[Image: Lildevil4ever]

Does wealth lead to innovation? Our list finds that median household income doesn’t determine startup success.
Why? “There is a reasonable hypothesis that areas that are fertile for startups are fertile at a point in time, such as Detroit in the 1890s,” says Ed Glaeser, Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics at Harvard. “Startups come, they succeed, and then it becomes progressively less friendly as the area becomes wealthier. A few dominant firms emerge and they eventually end up pushing out startups. Areas then have to find a way to reinvent themselves.”

Does wealth lead to innovation? Our list finds that median household income doesn’t determine startup success.

Why? “There is a reasonable hypothesis that areas that are fertile for startups are fertile at a point in time, such as Detroit in the 1890s,” says Ed Glaeser, Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics at Harvard. “Startups come, they succeed, and then it becomes progressively less friendly as the area becomes wealthier. A few dominant firms emerge and they eventually end up pushing out startups. Areas then have to find a way to reinvent themselves.”