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This is what the sounds of dominance, excitement, and desire look like. Beyond Verbal is a firm that maps the patterns and frequency of voices expressing various emotions.

What is this technology good for, you ask?

"If, say, Apple’s Siri understood how you were feeling in addition to what you were saying, it could pull up not just a playlist, but rather a playlist that matched your mood. Politicians could use the technology to practice enhancing qualities such as leadership in their voices while giving speeches. People with Asperger’s syndrome, who often have communication difficulties, could use it to understand verbal cues that extend beyond literal words. It could even help air traffic controllers identify when pilots were under stress."

More…

fastcodesign:

Unless you’re self-employed, we’re all cogs in a larger machine. The problem can be, how do you track that machine’s anatomy? How do you know what a “restructuring” really looks like, beyond that your middle manager has a new face?

Justin Matejka wondered the same thing after his relatively small employer Alias was acquired by Autodesk, so he created this remarkable animated visualization called the OrgOrgChart (Organic Organization Chart), which tracks every employee, manager, and departmental shift in the company from May 2007 to April 2011. Each second represents a week of activity for a growing staff, which expands from 6,500 to 7,500 people over this time.

(via fastcodesign)

How much water does it take to make a juicy hamburger? You’ll be amazed.

The water footprint of an object can be hard to wrap your head around. This video gives you a good sense of exactly how much water—everything from growing the cow’s food to making the bun—goes into your last burger.

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How much water does it take to make a juicy hamburger? You’ll be amazed.

The water footprint of an object can be hard to wrap your head around. This video gives you a good sense of exactly how much water—everything from growing the cow’s food to making the bun—goes into your last burger.

Read more->

According to scientists, we’re currently in the geological epoch known as theHolocene, which has lasted for the last 12,000 years. The Holocene encompasses the rise of humanity since the last ice age. But some scientists think we have actually entered a new era, called the Anthropocene—an era in which the world no longer shapes humanity, but in which humanity shapes the world to its own purpose and does so to such an extent that it will have permanent effects of the geological record of our planet.

This tour of our glowing transportation and communication networks shows the majesty—and horror—of how mankind has altered the planet.

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