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Watch: A Symphony Of Lullabies, Played By 40 Jogging Mice

Fabio Di Salvo and Bernardo Vercelli have a way with coaxing interesting harmonies out of unexpected sources. Known together as Quiet Ensemble, they’ve elicited audible frequencies from pears and pineapples. (Spolier alert: The fruits sound a lot like techno), and their latest endeavor allowed mice to remix works by famous composers.)

Curious? Find out more here.

fastcodesign:

Trying to convey the enormity of all existence, from the remote reaches of the universe to the invisible depths of intercellular life, is a pretty bold undertaking, especially when you’re trying to cram it all into a nine-minute film. Yet, Ray and Charles Eames took on that very challenge, and hit it out of the park (and the stratosphere, and the solar system…) with their 1977 clip, Powers of 10.

That seminal video not only illuminated the grandeur of the universe for generations of viewers but also proved that Eames’ brilliance for understanding and communicating transcended subject matter and media. Now, 40 artists are nearing completion on a 21st-century ode to the original, each contributing a segment in their own unique style.

(via fastcodesign)

How much water does it take to make a juicy hamburger? You’ll be amazed.

The water footprint of an object can be hard to wrap your head around. This video gives you a good sense of exactly how much water—everything from growing the cow’s food to making the bun—goes into your last burger.

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How much water does it take to make a juicy hamburger? You’ll be amazed.

The water footprint of an object can be hard to wrap your head around. This video gives you a good sense of exactly how much water—everything from growing the cow’s food to making the bun—goes into your last burger.

Read more->

It’s only appropriate that Eric Ries is the subject of the first video for Fast Company's new series: The Pivot. He’s the author of a best-selling book, The Lean Startup, and the man who made the term “pivot” part of the business vernacular. During the course of his entrepreneurial adventures, he realized that some of the most iconic companies of our time—Twitter, YouTube, Groupon—had abruptly changed course before they achieved success. If they hadn’t, Twitter would have stuck with audio podcasting, YouTube would have been a video dating site, and Groupon would have continued organizing political protests (and you likely would have never heard of them). Virtually every startup he could think of had pivoted at one time or another. Ries’s observation quickly morphed into a kind of Moore’s Law for startups, which he believes are almost certain to change course before becoming successful.
Watch the video->

It’s only appropriate that Eric Ries is the subject of the first video for Fast Company's new series: The Pivot. He’s the author of a best-selling book, The Lean Startup, and the man who made the term “pivot” part of the business vernacular. During the course of his entrepreneurial adventures, he realized that some of the most iconic companies of our time—Twitter, YouTube, Groupon—had abruptly changed course before they achieved success. If they hadn’t, Twitter would have stuck with audio podcasting, YouTube would have been a video dating site, and Groupon would have continued organizing political protests (and you likely would have never heard of them). Virtually every startup he could think of had pivoted at one time or another. Ries’s observation quickly morphed into a kind of Moore’s Law for startups, which he believes are almost certain to change course before becoming successful.

Watch the video->

TED-Ed’s New Video Tool Allows Anyone To Create Video Lessons Online 
TED-Ed’s new free platform allows anyone to “flip” any video on YouTube by adding custom content to play alongside it, making it possible to turn any piece of video content into a teachable moment.
Read more->

TED-Ed’s New Video Tool Allows Anyone To Create Video Lessons Online

TED-Ed’s new free platform allows anyone to “flip” any video on YouTube by adding custom content to play alongside it, making it possible to turn any piece of video content into a teachable moment.

Read more->


The most interesting and exciting part of the show is the relationship that I have with the audience. So in thinking about doing this again, that was certainly the first place that I looked. And thinking about, “Well, if I’m gonna do this, it’d be nice to get a little bit of a gauge of if they’re interested and whether they’re willing to support the effort.” The Kickstarter video was a little bit of a test in that way, saying that it was going to be different than the original. And it was just an amazing thing. I set kind of an arbitrary goal of $50,000 and we hit that in, I think, eight hours. And it ended up a little shy of $150,000. I ended up using Kickstarter as a background to actually start brainstorming about the show itself and reconnecting with folks who were interested in helping. I actually wound up meeting an animator through that experience; he’s now animating user dreams for a segment.

ZE FRANK ON HIS NEW SERIES AND CREATIVITY AS BRAIN CRACK

The most interesting and exciting part of the show is the relationship that I have with the audience. So in thinking about doing this again, that was certainly the first place that I looked. And thinking about, “Well, if I’m gonna do this, it’d be nice to get a little bit of a gauge of if they’re interested and whether they’re willing to support the effort.” The Kickstarter video was a little bit of a test in that way, saying that it was going to be different than the original. And it was just an amazing thing. I set kind of an arbitrary goal of $50,000 and we hit that in, I think, eight hours. And it ended up a little shy of $150,000. I ended up using Kickstarter as a background to actually start brainstorming about the show itself and reconnecting with folks who were interested in helping. I actually wound up meeting an animator through that experience; he’s now animating user dreams for a segment.

ZE FRANK ON HIS NEW SERIES AND CREATIVITY AS BRAIN CRACK

Berg Explores The Future Of Touchable Movies

We think of movies as linear progressions. It’s generally a story with a beginning, middle, and end—and it’s always something we consume from start to finish. Timo Arnall of Berg shows us all just how dated this view of video has become. In a project for Bonnier and Mag+, which I’ve dubbed “cinema glass,” he turns a movie into a swipeable, interactive entity on a tablet. And I don’t just mean that you can pause it or fast forward in some clever way. I mean, 2-D frames combine to become something that feels different than anything we’ve seen before.

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